Biolyzer and other software created by Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez

 

DO YOU WANT TO GET LAST NEWS, DEMO DOWNLOADS and FULL INFO ABOUT

BIOLYZER SOFTWARE ?

Do you want to know everything about Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis, JIP-Test Method and get info on other Software and Methods in Plant Research?

If your answer is YES, then please come to visit the official web page of Biolyzer at

http://www.fluoromatics.com

 

Here is a list of relevant scientific software written by Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez. All of the computer programs are actively used in applied technical projects and scientific research in different fields (biochemistry, photosynthesis, biophysics, ecology, ecophysiology, chemistry, chemical engineering, molecular structure determination by crystallographic methods, and other:

 

1. Biolyzer. Computer program for chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis. Link to Biolyzer Official Web Site

2. BioVision. Software for analysis of plant fluorescence 2D time sequenced images. Link

3. SparkPlot. Software for spectroscopic analysis of reflectance spectra. Link

4. PeakTrue. Software tools for X-Ray Powder Crystallographic Data Analysis of Polymer Materials. Link

5. Fluoromapper. Software for analysis of patterns in plant fluorescence population distributions. Link

 

The official distributor of former free versions of Biolyzer (version 1.0 to 4.0) is Fluoromatics Software. For getting a free copy of Biolyzer free version, please fill in the Contact Form here. If you have obtained one of the free distributed versions of Biolyzer Software, you are encouraged to register your free copy. Registration is free, it takes some minutes of your time, you don’t have to pay for your free copy and gives you access to certain advantages that Fluoromatics Software offers to all registered users of any of its software. If you own a copy of Biolyzer and you decide not to register your free copy, you put yourself alone at risk. You can read the Biolyzer License Agreement in the menu “About this program” located in the main menu of your free copy of Biolyzer. Do not support software piracy or any violations of Software Author’s Copyrights; register your free copy of Biolyzer today, now.

 

 About Biolyzer 5.x (Commercial version)

The new version Biolyzer 5.x is a completely new re-designed professional software that can be characterized as a mature, professional, high-level fluorescence analysis tool, and an excellent cost-value effective investment. Available on request by using the Contact form at www.fluoromatics.com. If you want to download a full working demo (30-days limited trial copy) of Biolyzer, or if you want to buy a full-license of Biolyzer, BioVision or Fluoromapper please visit http://www.fluoromatics.com.

 

Biolyzer is able to read raw data files compatible with Hansatech UK fluorometers (PEA and HandyPEA) and the FIM fluorometer. We can adapt Biolyzer to read any other instrument data files on request and to do any kind analysis required by your own research analysis method. Automation of calculation tasks is important as it decreases dramatically the time from acquisition to final presentation of research results. We can adapt any Fluoromatics Software to your fit the software needs in your technical and research field.

 

 

About Scientific Software Design Services by Fluoromatics

 

On your request, we create scientific software for Fluorescence Data Analysis or ANY other special purpose, data analysis, data mining, data visualization or data processing. We study your software need and we create software fully adapted to solve your specific research needs. Good software helps to speed the way you get fast results and fast research reports and publications. Interested? Then please visit the website of Fluoromatics, already available on the Internet at http://www.fluoromatics.com. Fluoromatics Sci&Tech Software Development Team is able to create a completely new software application for you that fit absolutely all of your scientific research and engineering needs. Simulations, Artificial Neural Networks, Math & Data Plotting,  Modeling with Cellular Automata, Finite Elements, Differential Equations, Compartmental models, and any other method you may prefer. Interested? Just send us an email to [email protected] or fill in the contact form at this link.

 

 

Impact of Biolyzer Software in Photosynthesis Research

 

Here are a few references (23) to scientific reports, scientific publications, habilitation thesis, PhD thesis and diploma works where Biolyzer has been used in for the analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence data.

 

There may exist many other papers, poster proceeding and oral presentations that refer to Biolyzer, unfortunately I have not all of them in my database. In case you need some paper from the list here, please let me know and I will send a PDF copy to you by e-mail on request.

 

NOTE: If you are aware of a publication where Biolyzer has been used, and you do not see that reference in this list, please let me know about it at this email address: [email protected]

 

 

1.    Bradford Sherman Ripley (July 2001) Page 49. PhD thesis. The Ecophysiology of Selected Coastal Dune Pioneer Plants of the Eastern Cape. Faculty of Science. Rhodes University. South Africa. Available at http://www.ru.ac.za/library/theses/2002/ripley/ft/ripley_thesis.pdf

 

2.    K Klem, M Špundová, H Hrabalová, J Nauš, M Váňová, J Masojídek & P Tomek (2002). Comparison of chlorophyll fluorescence and whole-plant bioassays of isoproturon. European Weed Research Society. Weed Research 42, Issue 5 page 335–341 doi:10.1046/j.1365-3180.2002.00293.x

 

3.    J.P. Zrÿd, M. Ianoz, F. Rachidi, P. Zweiacker, (2002) Influence of HF electromagnetic fields on the development and the molecular biology of the moss Physcomitrella patens and the nematode Caernorhabditis elegans, 14th International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Proceedings Supplement pp. 179-180, February 2002

 

4.    Maust, B. E., Espadas, F., Talavera, C., Aguilar, M., Santamaría, J. M., and Oropeza, C. (2003). Changes in carbohydrate metabolism in coconut palms infected with the lethal yellowing phytoplasma. Phytopathology Biochemistry and Cell Biology 93:976-98

 

5.    Heiko Wagner (2003) Diplomarbeit: Vergleichende Untersuchungen zum Einfluss des transthylakoidären Protonengradienten und des Redoxzustandes des Plastochinonpools auf das nichtphotochemische Quenching und dessen Wirkung auf die variable Fluoreszenz und Thermolumineszenz von Photosystem II. Universität Leipzig Fakultät für Biowissenschaften, Pharmazie und Psychologie. Available here:  http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~pflaphys/webdir/Daten/dissdipl/wagnerdipl.pdf

 

6.    Martin G Christensen, Harald B Teicher and Jens C Streibig (2003)  Linking fluorescence induction curve and biomass in herbicide screening, Pest Management Science 59:1303–1310 (online: 2003) DOI: 10.1002/ps.763

 

7.    E. Alasonati1, E. Comino1, A. Giudice1, M. Ianoz, F. Rachidi2, Y. Saidi3, J.P. Zryd3, P. Zweiacker, (2003) USE OF THE PHOTOSYNTHESIS PERFORMANCE INDEX TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS OF HIGH FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE MEMBRANE INTEGRITY OF THE MOSS P. PATENS. Laboratoire de Phytogénétique Cellulaire http://www2.unil.ch/lpc/docs/EMF.htm

 

8.    FILIPPO BUSSOTTI (2003) CHLOROPHYLL A FLUORESCENCE AS DIAGNOSTIC TOOL TO DETECT EARLY STRESS CONDITION IN LEAVES EXPOSED TO OZONE In “Establishing Ozone Critical Levels II” (Karlsson, P.E., Selldén, G., Pleijel, H., eds.). 2003. UNECE Workshop Report. IVL report B1523. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden. Online at http://www.ivl.se/rapporter/pdf/B1523B.pdf  

 

9.    R.K.Sarkar, D. Panda, D.N. Rao, S.G. Sharma. (2004) Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters as indicators of submergence tolerance in rice. Crop Management and Physiology. International Rice Research Institute. International Rice Research Notes.  Vol 29 Issue 1 Page 65-67 Available online at http://irri.org/publications/irrn/pdfs/vol29no1/IRRN29-1.pdf

 

10. Dusan Lazar (2004) The OKJIP Chlorophyll transient : Theory and experiments. Habilitation Thesis. December 2004. PalackyUniversity in Olomouc. Faculty of Sciences. Department of experimental Physics. Laboratory of Biophysics. Czeck Republic.

 

11. D. Parvanova, A. Popova, I. Zaharieva, P. Lambrev, T. Konstantinova, S. Taneva, A. Atanassov, V. Goltsev and D. Djilianov, (2004) Low Temperature Tolerance of Tobacco Plants Transformed to Accumulate Proline, Fructans, or Glycine Betaine. Variable Chlorophyll Fluorescence Evidence.  Photosynthetica  Springer Kluwer ISSN: 0300-3604 (Paper) 1573-9058 (Online) DOI: 10.1023/B:PHOT.0000040588.31318.0f  42 Number 2  Pages: 179 – 185

 

12. Filippo Bussotti (2004) Corso teorico-pratico su fluorescenza diretta della clorofilla a e JIP-Test "determinazione delle condizioni di stress nelle piante tramite l’analisi del transient 0-j-i-p" Categoria: Corsi di aggiornamento par Prof. Strasser, Univ. Ginevra. Inviato da: Filippo Bussotti Inviato il: May 17, 2004 Luogo: Rapolano Terme (Siena) Data: Jun 24, 2004 - Jun 25, 2004 Scadenza: Jun 05, 2004 Contatto: [email protected]t ; [email protected] Web: http://www.sisef.it/[email protected]/bull.php?action=bullIssue(24,-1)

 

13. Michel Ianoz, (July 26th 2004) The Biological and Health Effects of Electromagnetic Fields. Lecture IEEE EMC Society. E-Mail : [email protected] Meeting of the Rocky Mountain Chapter EMC Society

 

14. Elisabetta Gravanoa,1, Filippo Bussottia,*, Reto J. Strasserb, Marcus Schaubc, Kristopher Novakc, John Skellyd and Corrado Tania (2004) Ozone symptoms in leaves of woody plants in open-top chambers: ultrastructural and physiological characteristics PHYSIOLOGIA PLANTARUM 121: 620–633. 2004 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-3054.2004.00363.x

 

15. F Bussotti (2004) Assessment of stress conditions in Quercus ilex L. leaves by O-J-I-P chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis. Plant Biosystems. Volume 138, Number 2. Pages 101-109 DOI 10.1080/11263500412331283708

 

16. Петър Харалампиев Ламбрев (2004), ДИСЕРТАЦИЯ, ПРИЛОЖЕНИЕ НА БЪРЗАТА И ЗАБАВЕНАТА ХЛОРОФИЛНА ФЛУОРЕСЦЕНЦИЯ ЗА АНАЛИЗ ДЕЙСТВИЕТО НА ФОТОСИНТЕТИЧНИ ХЕРБИЦИДИ В ИНТАКТНИ ЛИСТА И ТИЛАКОИДНИ МЕМБРАНИ ОТ ГРАХ. СОФИЙСКИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ „СВ. КЛИМЕНТ ОХРИДСКИ“ БИОЛОГИЧЕСКИ ФАКУЛТЕТ Катедра „Биофизика и радиобиология“. Available Online. http://www.bio21.bas.bg/ibf/lambrev

Free translation: Peter Haralampiev Lambrev. (2004). PhD Thesis. Applications of fast and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence on the analysis of the herbicide effects in ther photosdynthetic functioning of leaves and thylakoid membranes of pea plants. Biophysics Faculty. Biophysics and Radiobilogy. University of Sofia Kliment Ochridskhi. Sofia. Bulgaria.

 

17. Project Report 2003-2004 Fondazione Lombardia per l'Ambiente. Effetti dell'ozono sulla vegetazione alpine. Effetti dell'inquinamento transfrontaliero da ozono sulla vegetazione dell'area transalpina tra Lombardia e Canton Ticino             http://www.flanet.org/ricerca/ozono02.asp http://www.flanet.org/ricerca/ozono02_relazione_04.pdf

 

18. Abbaspoor, Majid, Streibig, Jens C., (2005) Clodinafop changes the chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve Issn: 0043-1745 Journal: Weed Science Volume: 53 Issue: 1 Pages: 1-9 DOI: 10.1043/0043-1745(2005)053<0001:CCTCFI>2.0.CO;2

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1614/WS-04-131R?journalCode=wees

 

19. Filippo Bussotti, Giovanni Agati, Rosanna Desotgiu, Paolo Matteini and Corrado Tani, (June 2005) Ozone foliar symptoms in woody plant species assessed with ultrastructural and fluorescence analysis. New Phytologist Volume 166 Issue 3 Page 941 doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01385.x

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118647272/abstract

 

20. J. Mala, K. Klem, A. Lukavská and J. Masojídek, (2005) Ecological Risk Assessment Degradation and Movement in Soil of the Herbicide Isoproturon Analyzed by a Photosystem II–Based Biosensor J Environ Qual 34:1780-1788 (2005) DOI: 10.2134/jeq2004.0351

 

21. Birgit Gielena, Hans J. De Boecka, Catherine M. H. M. Lemmensa, Roland Valcke, Ivan Nijsa and Reinhart Ceulemansa (2005) Grassland species will not necessarily benefit from future elevated air temperatures: a chlorophyll fluorescence approach to study autumn physiology Physiologia Plantarum, Volume 125, Issue 1, Page 52 doi:10.1111/j.1399-3054.2005.00539.x

 

22. Christian A. Lange (2005), Untersuchungen zur phytotoxischen Wirkung von Tetrachlorethen und Trichloressigsäure auf Kiefer (Pinus sylvestris L.) und Birke (Betula pendula ROTH). Fakultät Forst-, Geo- und Hydrowissenschaften der Technischen Universität Dresden. Deutschland.

http://hsss.slub-dresden.de/pub2/dissertation/2005/forst-__geo-_und_hydrowissenschaften/1131619235163-8494/1131619235163-8494.pdf

http://deposit.ddb.de/cgi-bin/dokserv?idn=977715671&dok_var=d1&dok_ext=pdf&filename=977715671.pdf

 

23. Dušan Lazár (2006) The polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence rise measured under high intensity of exciting light Functional Plant Biology Volume 33 Number 1 pp. 9-30.

http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/FP05095.htm

 

24. Ludwig Weissflog, Gert Krueger, Nikolai Elansky, Erich Putz, Christian A. Lange, Lida Lisitzina, Andrea Pfennigsdorff and Karsten Kotte (2006), The phytotoxic effect of C1/C2-halocarbons and trichloroacetic acid on the steppe plant Artemisia lerchiana, Chemosphere, Volume 65, Issue 6, November 2006, Pages 975-980

 

25.   N. Çiçek and H. Çakırlar (2008), CHANGES IN SOME ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN SIX SOYBEAN CULTIVARS IN RESPONSE TO LONG-TERM SALINITY AT TWO DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES, Gen. Appl. Plant Physiology, Special Issue, 34, (3-4), 267-289.

 

26.  Lambrev, Ivanov, Goltsev (2003), Effects of prolonged action of sub-herbicide concentration of atrazine on the photosynthetic function of pea plants. Comptes rendus de l’Academie bulgare des Sciences, Tome 56, No,3, page 59-62.

 

27.  D. PARVANOVA, A. POPOVA, I. ZAHARIEVA, P. LAMBREV, T. KONSTANTINOVA, S. TANEVA, A. ATANASSOV, V. GOLTSEV, and D. DJILIANOV (2004), Low temperature tolerance of tobacco plants transformed to accumulate proline, fructans, or glycine betaine. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence evidence. PHOTOSYNTHETICA 42 (2): 179-185.

 

28.  F. L.  Marchand, Fred  Kockelbergh, Bart  van de Vijver, Louis  Beyens   and I.  Nijs  (2006), Are heat and cold resistance of arctic species affected by successive extreme temperature events? New Phytologist Volume 170 Issue 2, Pages 291 – 300. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118627163/abstract

 

29.  Abram J. Strauss, Philippus D. R. van Heerden, Misha de Beer, Gert H. J. Krüger and Reto J. Strasser(2008), Changes in O-J-I-P Fluorescence Rise Kinetics During Dark Chilling Provide Insight into Genotype-Specific Effects on Photosynthesis and N2 Fixation in Soybean, in Photosynthesis. Energy from the Sun, 14th International Congress on Photosynthesis Ed. By John F. Allen, Elisabeth Gantt, John H. Golbeck and Barry Osmond, part 24, pages 1593-1597, ISBN 978-1-4020-6707-5 (Print) 978-1-4020-6709-9 (Online), DOI 10.1007/978-1-4020-6709-9_342, Springer Netherlands.

 

30.  Alexandra Pinior1, Gisela Grunewaldt-Stöcker1 Contact Information, Henning von Alten1 and Reto J. Strasser (2005), Mycorrhizal impact on drought stress tolerance of rose plants probed by chlorophyll a fluorescence, proline content and visual scoring, Mycorrhiza, Volume 15, Number 8 / December, 2005, 596-605, Springer.

 

31.  J. Malya,b, K. Klemc, A. Lukavskáb,d and J. Masojídek (2005), Degradation and Movement in Soil of the Herbicide Isoproturon Analyzed by a Photosystem II–Based Biosensor, J Environ Qual 34:1780-1788 (2005), DOI: 10.2134/jeq2004.0351, http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/34/5/1780

 

32.  José F.C. Gonçalves*; Ulysses M. Santos Jr.; Adamir R. Nina Jr.; Larissa R. Chevreuil (2007), Energetic flux and performance index in copaiba (Copaifera multijuga Hayne) and mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) seedlings grown under two irradiance environments, Brazilian Journal of Plant Physiology, vol.19 no.3 Londrina July/Sept. 2007. doi: 10.1590/S1677-04202007000300001 

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1677-04202007000300001&script=sci_arttext&tlng=ptrg

 

33.  Nadine Schmidt, D I P L O M A R B E I T, DER EINFLUSS VON BIOTISCHEM STRESS AUF DIE THERMOLUMINESZENZSIGNALE VON TABAKBLÄTTERN, Universität Leipzig, Fakultät für Biowissenschaften, Pharmazie und Psychologie, 2005.

 

34.  C.A. Rolando and K.M. Little (2007), Measuring water stress in Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden seedlings planted into pots, South African Journal of Botany, Volume 74, Issue 1, January 2008, Pages 133-138

http://dx.doi.org doi:10.1016/j.sajb.2007.08.004   

 

35.  Shih-May Yang1, Chia-Yen Chang1, Makoto Yanagisawa1, Il Park2, Tung-Hai Tseng3 and Maurice S. B. Ku (2008), Transgenic Rice Expressing Cyanobacterial Bicarbonate Transporter Exhibited Enhanced Photosynthesis, Growth and Grain Yield, in Photosynthesis. Energy from the Sun, 14th International Congress on Photosynthesis, Part 20, 1247-1250, Edited by John F. Allen, Elisabeth Gantt, John H. Golbeck and Barry Osmond, Springer, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4020-6709-9_269

 

36.  Julien Louvieaux (2004) Mesure de l'efficacité d'extraits d'algues sur la vigne (Vitis vinifera L.), en conditions contrôlées et au vignoble, validée par la mesure de l'activité photosynthétique et les analyses chimiques,– Travail de Diplôma de grade en Génie Agronomique (Bioingénieur en Agronomie), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Belgique.

http://www.memoireonline.com/02/08/908/m_mesure-efficacite-extraits-algues-vigne-activite-photosynthetique-analyses-chimiques0.html

 

37.  Mara Isabel Aguilar, Maryosawa G. Romero, Mara Isabel Chvez, Beatriz King-Daz and Blas Lotina-Hennsen (2008), Biflavonoids Isolated from Selaginella lepidophylla Inhibit Photosynthesis in Spinach Chloroplasts, J. Agric. Food Chem., 2008, 56 (16), pp 6994–7000, DOI: 10.1021/jf8010432 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf8010432

 

38.  Alan Scarlett, Tamara S. Galloway, Martin Canty, Emma L. Smith, Johanna Nilsson, and Steven J. Rowland (2005), COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF TWO OIL DISPERSANTS, SUPERDISPERSANT-25 AND COREXIT 9527, TO A RANGE OF COASTAL SPECIES, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Volume 24, Issue 5 (May 2005), 1219–1227, http://www.setacjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1897%2F04-334R.1&ct=1

 

39.  Micol Rossini, Tesi di Dottorato (2006), ANALISI DELLO STATO DI SALUTE DELLA VEGETAZIONE MEDIANTE TELERILEVAMENTO IPERSPETTRALE: STIMA DI VARIABILI BIOCHIMICHE E FISIOLOGICHE A LIVELLO FOGLIARE E DI CANOPY. Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente e del Territorio, Facoltà di Scienze Matematiche, Fisiche e Naturali, UNIVERSITA’ DEGLI STUDI DI MILANO – BICOCCA

www.disat.unimib.it/Telerilevamento/Download/Tesi/Rossini_dott.pdf

 

40.  D. Moshou, S. Wahlen, R. Strasser, A. Schenk, J. De Baerdemaeker and H. Ramon (2005), Chlorophyll Fluorescence as a Tool for Online Quality Sorting of Apples, Biosystems Engineering, Volume 91, Issue 2, June 2005, Pages 163-172. doi:10.1016/j.biosystemseng.2005.03.008

   

 

WHO IS RONALD MALDONADO RODRIGUEZ?

 

Ronald is a chemical engineer who obtained a Master of Sciences degree in Chemical Engineering in Bulgaria. He is a top specialist in Organic Synthesis, Combustibles and Industrial Risk Management. After a first experience at the Central Research Laboratory of the University of Burgas and six years experience while working as a research assistant at Laboratory of Microbiology and Bioenergetics of the University of Geneva, he becomes very interested in the application of Artificial intelligence methods for the analysis of dynamic phenomena in photobiology and photophysics. Since 2001, he has been working in the analysis of different numerical simulation (in-silica) approaches for studying chlorophyll fluorescence at different levels: chloroplast, cell, leaf, whole plant, a group of trees and a whole biome. For the purposes of his modeling and simulation research work, Ronald has developed several analysis method based on cellular automata theory and artificial neural networks (Kohonen’s Self-Organizing Map). Ronald has conducted several plant research projects including the Rhin Sud INTERREG Project “Tree vitality”. Ronald has published original and coauthored scientific articles and has created several software packages related to his research work, for both, chlorophyll fluorescence analysis and pattern recognition of chlorophyll fluorescence signals. Beside his scientific interests, Ronald also has acquired solid technical and management skills after several years working as a Business Developer & Analyst, and Consultant expert in chemical and biotech industry at Lifescience Consulting SA, a Pharma & Biotech IT Swiss Company and also an excellent work experience as production chemical engineer in the pharmaceutical industry at BASF Orgamol Pharma Solutions SA, Switzerland.

 

As student in Bulgaria at the Higher Institute of Chemical Engineering (today University of Burgas Prof. Dr. Assen Zlatarov), Ronald was already highly interested in developing computers application in chemical engineering for process simulation. He worked with Dr. Anton Popov and Dr. Stancho Pavlov as a team leader of the Crystallographic Software Development Unit at the Central Research Laboratory of the Technological University of Burgas. While working in that research group Ronald wrote several software packages and made his first scientific publications in the field developed of X-Ray Powder Crystallography of high molecular weight polymers, which includes software for polymer molecular structure determination based on X-Ray powder diffraction analysis.

 

While working with Prof. Aristoteles Dimov within the Ecology Department of the University of Burgas, Ronald was in charge of a laboratory research group for making environmental chemical analysis (organic pollutants, waste water) for governmental and private industrial enterprises. Among the milestones of this group we find a novel detersive agent with special surfactant properties developed for the Bulgarian mining industry.

 

Later on, Ronald starts to work as an assistant of Prof. Reto Strasser at the Bioenergetics Laboratory of the University of Geneva. There, Ronald was in charge of teaching and research duties, advice and guidance of diploma students and Erasmus student projects as well. As researcher, he developed an ecophysiology research project within the Swiss Canopy Crane Project facilities at Hofstetten, Basel, about the effects of CO2 enrichment on the surrounding atmosphere of forest trees and reported it as a main topic of his PhD work. There is an important paper about this topic.

 

During that time, and in collaboration with Murielle Eyletters, J.P. Delhaye from ULB Brussels and the Infrastructure Ministry of Belgium, Ronald studied the effects of urban pollution on city trees using mainly chlorophyll fluorescence analysis and Infrared aerial photography. The joint-research group used infrared airborne imaging for monitoring historically important urban trees over Brussels city and they found a strong correlation between tree health status parameters calculated with airborne infrared imaging analysis and in situ chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. There are two papers product of this research study.

 

With Prof. Giuseppe Torzillo (Univ. of Florence, Italy) and Prof. Jiri Mazojidek (Trebon Microbiology Section, Academy of Science, Tchek Republic) Ronald studied the influence of nutrient deficiencies on the induction of carotenoid production by the green algae Chlorella sp. No publication has been reported as an output of this work. Green algae are a rich source of carotenoids and its production represents an important commercial affair for private industry business.

 

Ronald has also worked with Dr. Francisco Barja (Lab of Microbiology at the Univ. of Geneva) and Prof. Maria Fillat (Univ. of Zaragoza, Spain) on the effect of Lindane and Metilviologen (pesticide, herbicide) on the photosynthetic apparatus of Anabaena sp. cyanobacteria.  In collaboration with two Spanish students, Marta Bueno and Idoia Alonso, Ronald investigated respectively the effect of herbicides on wild type Anabaena cultivars and the Fe deficiency effects on Mutant and Wild type Anabaena. Two papers are the product of this fruitful collaboration.

 

Ronald worked with Prof. Alberto Gonzalez and Prof. Jose Luis Sanchez (The University of Madrid and the Spanish Institute for Agricultural Research INIA, respectively) and Dr. Stancho Pavlov (University of Burgas Prof. Dr. Assen Zlatarov, Bulgaria) on the application of artificial neural networks for the classification of Pisum sativum L. (pea) plants according to their resistance to drought stress using Chlorophyll a fluorescence signals. The paper “Can machines recognize plant stress?” has been published as a result of this fruitful collaboration. Later on, and in collaboration with Prof. Gonzalez, Ronald studied the influence of modern urban architecture on trees and bushes. They published a poster and proceeding paper about this subject.

 

In 2001, Ronald developed a novel method for measuring Nitrogen content in leguminous plants based using fast fluorescence kinetics analysis. The experimental work was done in collaboration with Patrick Schmitz (who was diploma student at the Bioenergetics lab at that time). They presented a poster about this work at the International Congress of Photosynthesis in Brisbane, Australia 2001 and the results of an extension of this work were published at the EMEC3 Environmental Chemistry International Congress held in 2002 in Geneva, Switzerland. A deep analysis of these results is being prepared in collaboration with Mrs. Anna Gabriela Perez Rivas. In this publication a novel multivariate analysis and backpropagation neural network analysis is presented. Ronald has been working with Prof. Francklin Rivas-Echeverría and Mrs Anna Pérez-Méndez (University of Merida, Venezuela) developing a new methodology for data analysis based on neural networks and statistical methods. As a result of this fruitful joint research, they have published a paper in the WSEAS Neural Networks Conference that did win the BEST PAPER Award of the WSEAS Congress held in Lisbon in July 2005. They presented also a poster that won the BEST STUDENT POSTER Award at this same event. This collaboration is being extended to the study Nitrogen fixation in leguminous plant varieties.

 

Ronald has also studied the chlorophyll fluorescence emission responses in different types of corals living in simulated light day cycled conditions, in order to evaluate physiological diurnal changes. The results of this work were presented as a poster at the Photosynthesis International Congress held in 2001 in Brisbane, Australia.

 

Ronald is winner of the prize to the BEST STUDENT POSTER in the 13th Congress of the European Federation of Plant Physiology Societies (Heraklion, Crete, 2002) for his research work and developed application using artificial neural networks to detect biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Moreover, Ronald has developed an artificial neural network technique for analyzing the evolution of Rhizobium nodulation in Vigna unguiculata (cowpea) and for detecting fixed Nitrogen content in mychorrized plants. I have worked with Prof. Lydia Serrano (Technological University of Barcelona, Spain) on the acclimation of Mediterranean plants to diurnal light and drought stress. We intent to demonstrate the application of neural networks for the identification of plant functional groups using ecophysiology experiments.

 

Ronald has collaborated with Prof. Rafael Navarro (University of Cordoba, Spain) to study the fluorescence response of different Pinus halepensis provenance varieties. A poster was presented in Murcia in 2005. Ronald also has collaborated with Angel Blazquez (University of Cordoba, Spain) to analyze fluorescence data of plants exposed to artificial and natural fertilization methods.

 

In collaboration with Prof. V. Goltsev and Dr. Peter Lambrev (University of Sofia Kliment Ochridski, Bulgaria), Ronald has studied the action and dynamics of photosynthetic herbicides (Diuron, Atrazine) on whole Pisum sativum plants using a novel chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technique. A paper about this work is in the way be prepared by Dr. Lambrev.

 

Ronald is author of several software packages like Biolyzer for analysis of fast induction kinetics from chlorophyll containing samples also known as OJIP curves and measured with Hansatech UK fluorometers. One of the many features of this program is that it includes the full JIP-test method for calculation photosynthetic behavior in plants, algae and cianobacteria; Spark software for reflectance signals (measured with UniSpec reflectometer by Optisciences); and FluoVision Software for chlorophyll fluorescence imaging analysis. Today, Biolyzer is used in many laboratories worldwide. The versions 1 to 3 were distributed as freeware (freely available for non-profit research and academic purposes).

 

Ronald is also author of several other copyrighted scientific software: Fluolyzer, FluoVision, SciPlot and Miller.

 

For contact, send your e-mail to [email protected]

 

 

PUBLICATIONS OF RONALD MALDONADO RODRIGUEZ

 

Can machines recognize stress in plants?

Link: Environmental Chemistry Letters (2003) 1(3): 201–205

Springer Berlin / Heidelberg

ISSN: 1610-3653 (Paper) 1610-3661 (Online)

DOI: 10.1007/s10311-003-0034-7

For a PDF copy of this paper click here

Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez1, Stancho Vaelkanov Pavlov2, Alberto Gonzalez Moreno3, Abdullah Okarum1, Reto Strasser1

(1)  Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

(2)  Department of Mathematics, University Asen Zlatarov, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria

(3)  INIA Carretera de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Keywords:  Artificial neural networks - Chlorophyll a fluorescence - Drought stress - JIP-test - O-J-I-P fluorescence rise - Pea - Pisum sativum - Plants - Self-organizing map – SOM - Kohonen

Abstract 

In this paper we show that chlorophyll a fluorescence signals analysed with the self-organizing map (SOM) can be used as a routine tool for the monitoring and classification of pea varieties (Pisum sativum) according to their degree of resistance against drought stress. Fluorescence kinetics measurements were obtained from non-stressed plants. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of artificial intelligence techniques in eco-physiological research. Our goal is to provide a fast tool that will contribute to the knowledge needed to develop strategies that would help to decrease the impact of environmental stress in agriculture and forestry.

 

A Methodological Approach for Pattern Recognition System using discriminate analysis and artificial neural networks

Link: Proceedings of the 6th WSEAS Neural Networks, Fuzzy Systems, Evolutionary Computing Conference held in Lisbon, Portugal, 14-18 July 2005.  [496-183]

WSEAS Transactions Journal (Accepted for Publication July 2005)

Anna Pérez-Méndez, Elizabeth Torres-Rivas,  Francklin Rivas-Echeverría, Ronald Maldonado-Rodríguez

This work is the result of a scientific collaboration between the Escuela de Estadística and the Laboratorio de Sistemas Inteligentes de la Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela and Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez at  the Bioenergetics Laboratory of the  University of Geneva, Switzerland. e-mail: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Keywords: - Classification, Pattern recognition, Discriminate analysis, Artificial Neural Networks

Abstract

In this work it is presented a methodology for the development of a pattern recognition system using classification methods as discriminate analysis and artificial neural networks. In this methodology, the information statistical analysis is contemplated, with the purpose of retaining the observations and the important characteristics that can produce an appropriate classification, and allows, as well, to detect outliers’ observations, and multicolinearity between variables, among other things.

 

Pisum sativum classification based on a methodological approach for pattern recognition using discriminant analysis and neural networks

Link: Proceedings of the 6th WSEAS Neural Networks, Fuzzy Systems, Evolutionary Computing held in Lisbon, Portugal 14-18 July 2005 [496-184]

WSEAS Transactions Journal (accepted for publication 07.05)

Anna Pérez-Méndez, Ronald Maldonado-Rodríguez, Elizabeth Torres-Rivas, Franklin Rivas-Echeverría.

This work is the result of a scientific collaboration between the Escuela de Estadística and the Laboratorio de Sistemas Inteligentes de la Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela, and Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez at the Bioenergetics Laboratory of the University of Geneva, Switzerland. e-mail: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Keywords: - Classification, Pattern recognition, Discriminate analysis, Artificial Neural Networks

For this paper the authors were awarded with the Best Student Paper Prize for Fuzzy Systems at the 6th WSEAS Lisbon 2005 Conference. Read more here.

Abstract

In this work a statistical analysis-based methodological approach for a pattern recognition system using discriminate analysis and neural networks is used for the classification of Pisum sativum (pea) according to the drought resistance. The statistical techniques used in the exploratory analysis are a fundamental tool in the creation of variables sets and observations for the model adjustment in the neural models and in the discriminate models.

WSEAS is The World Scientific and Engineering Academy and Society.

 

Chlorophyll a fluorescence patterns of six deciduous forest tree species exposed to normal and elevated CO2

R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. Strasser.

Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

Abstract

Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are able to discover “patterns” in multivariate data. We show that ANN may offer a realistic opportunity to automation of physiological patterns identification and plant stress quantification by using Chlorophyll a Fluorescence (CF) signals as network information input.  Fluorescence is a widely spread technique used in many photosynthesis and eco-physiology research laboratories, and it finds numerous applications, from agriculture and forestry, through marine biology and chronobiology to exobiology research. CF signals are a direct measure of photosynthetic performance in plants and algae. Fluorescence signals are a definitive proof for photosynthesis. Measuring fluorescence is cheap, fast, and non-destructive. In a relative short time, thousands of fluorescence curves can be collected. The task of identification of CF patterns that correlate with other physiological parameters becomes a necessity. The physiological responses of photosynthetic organisms to well-defined stimuli have been observed to be similar, presenting well-defined patterns and indeed this characteristic suggest the possibility to group plants, green algae and cyanobacteria into categories or classes according to their specific fluorescence pattern. Since pattern recognition is the primary emphasis, an ANN seems to be the most logical method of solving this problem. Formed by simulated neurons connected together much the same way the brain's neurons are, ANN are able to associate and generalize without rules. They have solved problems in pattern recognition, robotics, speech processing, financial predicting, and signal processing, to name a few. The Self-Organizing Feature Map (SOM) is a popular ANN. We build a SOM using plant fluorescence signals as stimulatory input and the resulting Fluorotopic Map has shown to be a valuable tool for identification of plant classes. Such classes may vary according to their taxonomy, functional groups, wild type or genetically modified plants, degree of stress effects, etc. We demonstrate a novel methodology for plant stress survey using short video sequences of whole leaf fluorescence analyzed with a Batch-SOM. The new developed technique includes spatio-temporal analysis of fluorescence kinetics obtained from video processing combined with fast fluorescence induction measurements. Using this technique, a new method for recognizing and quantifying plant stress has been developed. We have tested the applicability of this new technique within the Swiss Canopy Crane Project framework (Hofstetten, Basel), where the goal was to compare the photosynthetic performance of forest trees growing in an enriched CO2 atmosphere to that of trees growing in an ambient CO2 atmosphere. Further modelling of leaf photosynthetic performance and up-scaling of the proposed model from the leaf to the forest level, as well as applications in Plant Health Status Survey, Forest Management, Precision Agriculture and Urban Tree Vitality Assessment are discussed. 

 

Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for monitoring the evolution of Rhizobium nodulation status in Vigna unguiculata

Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez, Patrick Schmitz, Reto Strasser.

Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

Abstract        

Chlorophyll a fluorescence is a useful and non-invasive tool to screen for the effects of many biotic and abiotic parameters on photosynthesis in plants. The Chl a fluorescence emitted by leaves after excitation with red light was measured with a portable fluorometer. The collected data showing the polyphasic OJIP Chl a fluorescence rise were analysed using the JIP-test (Strasser and al. 2000) which provides biophysical parameters indicating Photosystem II properties. Seeds of Vigna unguiculata were sterilized before germination. Seedlings were planted in Magenta jars (used for hydroponic cultures) filled with a nitrate-deficient solution (B&D solution). The roots of some of the plants were inoculated with Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 (109 bacteria/200 µl) four days after germination. The other plants were grown on various concentrations of KNO3 (0, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 20 mM). The plants were followed for 5 weeks. During this time fluorescence measurements were done on the first and second mature leaves. We have use an Artificial Neural Network (Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map or SOM) to analyze the raw fluorescence data. The generated map shows very well defined groups of different concentrations creating a gradient from low to high nitrate content. The Rhizobium inoculated plants in the fluorescence SOM map is moving in time according to the hypothetical nitrogen supply model. This permits us to establish a method for screening the nodulation evolution as well as nitrogen deficiency in vivo on the level of the leaves.

 

Ecophysiological responses to summer drought in Pinus halepensis Mill. seedlings of five provenances

Rafael Mª Navarro1, David Ariza1, Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez, Francisco Canovas.

In preparation

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

Resumen

En este ensayo se estudia la utilidad de las medidas de la cinética de inducción de fluorescencia de la clorofila de hojas in situ para detectar la respuesta temprana a estrés hídrico moderado de cinco procedencias Pinus halepensis Mill.. Las plantas se sometieron a un ciclo de sequías de 28 días en una cámara de cultivo a 21ºC. Se han encontrado diferencias significativas de supervivencia entre las procedencias a los 21 días, pero no al final del ensayo. La variación en la fluorescencia ha mostrado que la eficiencia potencial del fotosistema II de las plantas sometidas a un estrés hídrico moderado es menor conforme aumenta el nivel de estrés (medido en potencial hídrico) y que esta diferencia varía entre procedencias, por lo que puede representar una medida indirecta del nivel de estrés en etapas previas a la aparición de perdidas generales de supervivencia.

 

Quality assessment of urban trees: A comparative study of physiological characterisation, airborne imaging and on site fluorescence monitoring by the JIP-test

Link: Journal of Plant Physiology 160 (1): 81–90 (2003)

Urban & Fischer Verlag Publishers DOI: 10.1078/0176-1617-00917

For a PDF copy of this article click here

Christian Hermans1, 2, a, Mathias Smeyers3, Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez1, Murielle Eyletters2, Reto J. Strasser1, Jean-Paul Delhaye2 *

1 Bioenergetics Laboratory, University of Geneva, chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254, Jussy-Geneva, Switzerland

2 Laboratoire d’Agrotechnologies Végétales – CP169, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 50 Av. F.D. Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium

3 Laboratoire de Physiologie Végétale – CP206-2, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bd. du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium

Keywords: Chlorophyll fluorescence – Tree vitality – Urban tree stress factors – JIP-Test – Performance Index

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the complementary utility of chlorophyll fast fluorescence OJIP transient (from 50µs to 1s) measurements in the aerial study of rows of trees. We identify limitations in photochemical events induced by urban injuries on Platanus acerfolia L., using the JIP-test procedure. The Performance Index (PIABS) showed the largest dynamic range to characterise the vitality of trees. Individual trees were graded into three quality groups based on the individual PIABS value compared to the overall average for trees in the alley. These groups are: high performers, with PIABS 50% higher than the alley average; normal trees, with a deviation from the alley average between –50% and +50%; and poor performers, whose deviation from the alley average was –50% or less. Trees also were grouped into five vitality categories on the basis of a stereoscopic and morphologic observation of the symmetry of tree crowns, percentage of defoliation and reflectance property in the visible and infra-red range. Here, we report a remarkable correlation between the airborne remote sensing data and the on-site fluorescence measurements.

 

Prompt and delayed Chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis of intact pea leaves treated with photosynthetic herbicides

Petar H. Lambrev, Vassilij N. Goltsev, Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez, Reto J. Strasser

1 Faculty of Biophysics. University of Sofia “Kliment Ohridskii”; Sofia, Bulgaria

2 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

Abstract.

A method for testing the activity of photosynthetic herbicides in intact plant objects based on measurements of prompt and millisecond delayed chlorophyll fluorescence was proposed. The activities of Diuron, Atrazine and Dinoseb were determined in pea leaves. Different methods for treatment of leaves were compared in respect to their efficiency.  It was found that manually infiltrating the leaves by vacuum is not suitable for measuring the herbicide activity because the variability is rather high. The most efficient and reliable way of treatment with Urea/Triazine herbicides was by allowing the plants to absorb and transport the substance through the stems. The results demonstrate that quantitative measurements of herbicide activity are possible in intact leaves by means of luminescence methods. Several factors were shown to have significant impact on the final effect such as the need of light for herbicide penetration or the statistical heterogeneity of the sample. Submitted

 

Effects of Lindane on the Photosynthetic Apparatus of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena: Fluorescence Induction Studies and Immunolocalization of Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase.

Environmental Sciences & Pollution Research 11 (2) 98–106 (2004)

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1065/espr2003.10.175 Link to the Publisher Web site

For a free PDF copy of this article click here

Marta Bueno1, Maria F. Fillat1, Reto J. Strasser2, Ronald Maldonado-Rodriguez2, Nerea Marina1, Henry Smienk1, Carlos Gómez-Moreno1 and Francisco Barja3*

1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Pedro Cerbuna 12, University of Zaragoza, Spain

2 Bioenergetics Laboratory, University of Geneva, Chemin des Embrouchis 10, CH-1254 Jussy-Geneva, Switzerland

3 Bioenergetics and Microbiology Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

Abstract

Intention, Goal, Scope, Background

Cyanobacteria have the natural ability to degrade moderate amounts of organic pollutants. However, when pollutant concentration exceeds the level of tolerance, bleaching of the cells and death occur within 24 hours. Under stress conditions, cyanobacterial response includes the short-term adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light quality, named state transitions. Moreover, prolonged stresses produce changes in the functional organization of phycobilisomes and in the core-complexes of both photosystems, which can result in large changes in the PS II fluorescence yield. The localization of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) at the ends of some peripheral rods of the cyanobacterial phycobilisomes, makes this protein a useful marker to check phycobilisome integrity.

Objective

The goal of this work is to improve the knowledge of the mechanism of action of a very potent pesticide, lindane (γ-hexachlorocyclohexane), in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp., which can be considered a potential candidate for bioremediation of pesticides. We have studied the effect of lindane on the photosynthetic apparatus of Anabaena using fluorescence induction studies. As ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase plays a key role in the response to oxidative stress in several systems, changes in synthesis, degradation and activity of FNR were analyzed. Immunolocalization of this enzyme was used as a marker of phycobilisome integrity. The knowledge of the changes caused by lindane in the photosynthetic apparatus is essential for rational further design of genetically-modified cyanobacteria with improved biorremediation abilities.

Methods

Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence rise measurements (OJIP) have been used to evaluate the vitality and stress adaptation of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7119 in the presence of increasing concentrations of lindane. Effects of the pesticide on the ultrastructure have been investigated by electron microscopy, and FNR has been used as a marker of phycobilisome integrity.

Results and Discussion

Cultures of Anabaena sp. treated with moderate amounts of lindane showed a decrease in growth rate followed by a recovery after 72 hours of pesticide treatment. Concentrations of lindane below 5 ppm increased the photosynthetic performance and activity of the cells. Higher amounts of pesticide caused a decrease in these activities which seems to be due to a non-competitive inhibition of PS II. Active PS II units are converted into non-QA reducing, so called heat sink centers. Specific activity and amount of FNR in lindane-treated cells were similar to the values measured in control cultures. Release of FNR from the thylakoid after 48 hours of exposure to 5 ppm of lindane towards the cytoplasm was detected by immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. Conclusions. From these results, we conclude that the photosynthetic performance and activity of the cells are slightly increased in the presence of lindane up to 5 ppm. Moreover, in those conditions, lindane did not produce significant changes in the synthesis, degradation or activity of FNR. The high capability of Anabaena to tolerate lindane makes this cyanobacterium a good candidate for phytoremediation of polluted areas.

Recommendation and Outlook

The results of this study show that cultures of Anabaena PCC 7119 tolerate lindane up to 5 ppm, without significant changes in the photosynthetic vitality index of the cells. However, a slight increase in phycobiliprotein synthesis is observed, which is related to total protein content. This change might be due to degradation of proteins less stable than phycobiliproteins. An identification of the proteins with altered expression pattern in the presence of the pesticide remains the subject of further work and will provide valuable information for the preparation of strains which are highly tolerant to lindane.

 

Mutants of Anabaena PCC 7120 lacking of alr1690 and afurA antisense RNA show a pleiotropic phenotype and altered photosynthesis and respiration rates

Hernández1,3, J.A., Alonso1, I., Maldonado-Rodríguez, R. 2, Peleato, M.L. 1 Strasser, R2., Barja, F. 2and Fillat M,F1,&.

1 Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular y Celular. Facultad de Ciencias. Universidad de Zaragoza. 50009-Zaragoza, Spain.

2 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

3 Present address: Plant and Microbial Biology Department. 211 Koshland Hall. University of California at Berkeley. 94720 Berkeley, CA, USA

Abstract

Fur proteins are global regulators present in all prokaryotes. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 the product of furA controls iron homeostasis and is an essential gene that lays tail-to-tail with alr1690. Recently, it has been identified a new cis-acting antisense RNA, -furA RNA that interferes with FurA expression. The -furA RNA covers the complete furA transcript and it is transcribed in the same message that alr1690 m-RNA. Disruption of the -furA-alr1690 message produces the pleiotropic JAH3 mutant strain that overexpresses FurA. In this work we show that JAH3 cells present altered photosynthetic and respiratory activities and exhibit severe alterations in their ultrastructure. Submitted

 

Proceeding, Posters and Oral Presentations in International Meetings and Workshops

 

Poster Leipzig March 2000

Software for calculation and plotting of the membrane energetic fluxes: The pipeline model

R. Maldonado Rodriguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Fluorescence Workshop. Institute of Plant Physiology. University of Leipzig

 

Oral presentation Basel March 2000

Characterization of six deciduous tree species and four conifer tree species during the growing season 1999 by the JIP test

R. Maldonado Rodriguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Swiss Canopy Crane Project Workshop. Institute of Botany, Basel.

 

Oral presentation Basel April 2001

Characterization of six deciduous species exposed to elevated CO2 enrichment during the growing season 2000 by the JIP test

R. Maldonado Rodriguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Swiss Canopy Crane Project Workshop. Institute of Botany, Basel.

 

Oral presentation Basel March 2003

Characterization of six deciduous species exposed to elevated CO2 enrichment during the growing season 2001 by the JIP test

R. Maldonado Rodriguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Swiss Canopy Crane Project Workshop. Institute of Botany, Basel.

 

Oral presentation Basel February 2004

Characterization of six deciduous species exposed to elevated CO2 enrichment during the growing seasons 2002 and 2003 by the JIP test

R. Maldonado Rodriguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Swiss Canopy Crane Project Workshop. Institute of Botany, Basel.

 

Poster Zurich April 2001

The JIP Test: A New Tool in Plant Research

R. Maldonado Rodríguez, C. Hermans, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Biotechnology Start-up Workshop organized by ETH Zurich

 

Poster Bruges June 2001

Biosensing methods to assess environmental stress encountered by sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

Hermans, C. Maldonado-Rodríguez R., Strasser, R. J.

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Proceedings of the 24th IIRB Congress. 26-27 June 2001. Bruges, Belgium. Page 424-428

 

Poster Australia August 2001

Coral life as probed by their fluorescence emission

F. Sinniger, R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. J. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Link to abstract in CSIRO PUBLISHING - Science Access

Proceedings of International Photosynthesis Congress. Brisbane August 2001

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, Queensland, Australia, August 18-23, 2001.

Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Photosynthesis. Brisbane Australia 2001 ISBN O 643 06711 6

 

Poster Australia August 2001

Evaluation of the nodulated status of Vigna unguiculata probed by the JIP-test based on the chlorophyll a fluorescence rise

P. Schmitz, R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Link to abstract in CSIRO PUBLISHING - Science Access

Proceedings of International Photosynthesis Congress. Brisbane August 2001

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, Queensland, Australia, August 18-23, 2001.

Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Photosynthesis. Brisbane Australia 2001 ISBN O 643 06711 6

http://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=SA0403684.pdf

 

 

Poster Czech Republic, Novy-Hradic August 2001

In vivo Chlorophyll a Fluorescence imaging of herbicide infiltration in Pisum sativum

R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract Book of the II Regional Fluorescence Imaging Workshop. Institute of Photosynthesis Research. Czech Academy of Sciences.

 

Oral presentation Varna, Bulgaria September 2002

Luminescent control of biotic and abiotic stress effects in plants

Goltsev, V., Zaharieva, I., Lambrev, Maldonado-Rodriguez, R., Strasser, R. J. 

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

European Workshop on Environmental Stress and Sustainable Agriculture, 7-12 September 2002, Varna

Bulgaria

 

Poster Cordoba July 2002

Análisis De La Respuesta De La Variedad De Olivo “Cornicabra” A Las Aportaciones De Fertilizantes Orgánicos, Mediante El Test De Cinética Rápida De Fluorescencia, Jip-Test

Alberto González Moreno1Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez2

1 INIA Carretera de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid, Spain

2 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

Plant Physiology Workshop Cordoba July 2002 organized by the University of Barcelona, Spain.

 

Poster Crete September 2002

Artificial Neural Networks for the Characterization of Eight Varieties of Pea (Pisum Sativum)

This poster was awarded with the “BEST STUDENT POSTER” prize, selected among other 633 posters.

R. Maldonado Rodríguez1,  A. Gonzales2,  L. Ayerbe2,  J. Sanches2, S. V. Pavlov3, R. Strasser1

1 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

2 INIA Ctra de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid, Spain

3 Department of Mathematics, University Assen Zlatarov, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria 

13th Congress of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology held at Hersonissos, Crete, Greece

 

POSTER Crete September 2002

How Pea Plants Respond To Elevated Temperature and Repetitive Saturating Light Pulses

A. Okarum, R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. J. Strasser

Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland.

13th Congress of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology held at Hersonissos, Crete, Greece

 

Poster Crete September 2002

Characterization Of Eight Varieties Of Pea (Pisum Sativum) By the Jip-Test

A. Gonzales1, F. Reverchon2, R. Maldonado Rodríguez2, R. Strasser2

1 INIA Ctra de la Coruña, 28040 Madrid, Spain

2 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

13th Congress of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology held at Hersonissos, Crete, Greece

 

Poster EMEC3 Geneva December 2002

Neural Networks for Monitoring Environmental Stress Effects on plants

Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez1, Stancho Vaelkanov Pavlov2, Reto Strasser1

1 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

2 Department of Mathematics, Technological University Assen Zlatarov, 1 Prof. Jakimov blvd, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria 

3rd European Meeting on Environmental Chemistry EMEC3, December 11 to 17 2002 Geneva, Switzerland. 

http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/ACE

 

Poster EMEC3 Geneva December 2002

Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for monitoring the evolution of Rhizobium nodulation status in Vigna unguiculata

P. Schmitz1­, R. Maldonado Rodríguez1, S. Pavlov2, W. Broughton3, R. Strasser1

1 Laboratory of Bioenergetics and Microbiology. University of Geneva. 10, Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Geneva, Switzerland

2 Department of Mathematics, Technological University Assen Zlatarov, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria 

3rd European Meeting on Environmental Chemistry EMEC3, December 11 to 17 2002 Geneva, Switzerland.

http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/ACE

 

Poster Geneva EMEC3 December 2002

A fast routine for monitoring plant health status

A. Okarom, R. Maldonado Rodríguez, S Elmadidi & R. J. Strasser

3rd European Meeting on Environmental Chemistry EMEC3, December 11 to 17 2002 Geneva, Switzerland. 

http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/ACE

 

Oral presentation Cordoba March 2003

A comparison of the JIP Test and the Self-Organizing Map neural network for the classification of pea varieties into Drought Stress Resistance categories

Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez1, Stancho Pavlov2, Reto Strasser1

(1)  Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

(2)  Department of Mathematics, University Asen Zlatarov, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria

University of Cordoba, March 11 2003. Seminar organized by the Forest Sciences Faculty of the University of Cordoba, Spain.

 

Oral presentation Mallorca March 2003

Can machines recognize stress in plants? A neural Network Approach

Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez1, Stancho Pavlov2, Reto Strasser1

(1)  Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

(2)  Department of Mathematics, University Asen Zlatarov, 8010 Burgas, Bulgaria

Congress of the Association of Applied Biologist “Optimisation of water use by plants in the Mediterranean” held at Cala Bona, Majorca, from 24 to 27 March 2003-11-27

http://www.aab.org.uk

 

Poster presentation Mallorca March 2003

Effect of water stress and re-watering of eleven varieties barley in early stage: Characterisation by the JIP-test 

R Maldonado-Rodriguez, A Okarom (University Of Geneva, Switzerland), S Elmadidi (Laboratoire D'etude De La Variabilité Génétique, Morocco), A Gonzales (Inia, Spain) & R J Strasser (University Of Geneva, Switzerland)

Congress of the Association of Applied Biologist “Optimization of water use by plants in the Mediterranean” held at Cala Bona, Majorca, from 24 to 27 March 2003-11-27

http://www.aab.org.uk

 

Poster Mallorca March 2003

Response of lentil plant to drought stress combined with short time exposure to high temperature shocks

A OKAROM, R MALDONADO-RODRIGUEZ (University of Geneva, Switzerland), S ELMADIDI (Laboratoire d'Etude de la Variabilité Génétique, Morocco) & R J STRASSER (University of Geneva, Switzerland) 

Congress of the Association of Applied Biologist “Optimization of water use by plants in the Mediterranean” held at Cala Bona, Majorca, from 24 to 27 March 2003-11-27

http://www.aab.org.uk

 

Oral presentation Basel February 2004

Chlorophyll a fluorescence patterns of 6 deciduous species exposed to normal and elevated CO2 in an open air FACE installation

R. Maldonado Rodríguez, R. Strasser

Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

Swiss Canopy Crane Project Workshop February 2004. Institute of Botany, Basel.

 

Poster Barcelona March 2004

CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IN FIVE PROVENANCE Pinus halepensis Mill TO QUANTIFY RESPONSE TO WATER STRESS

Rafael Mª Navarro Cerrillo, Ronald Maldonado Rodríguez, David Ariza

Bioenergetics Laboratory, 10 Chemin des Embrouchis, CH-1254 Jussy, Switzerland

 

Poster Lisbon July 2005

A Methodological Approach for Pattern Recognition System using discriminate analysis and artificial neural networks

Anna Pérez-Méndez, Elizabeth Torres-Rivas,  Francklin Rivas-Echeverría, Ronald Maldonado-Rodríguez

WSEAS Neural Networks, Fuzzy Systems, Evolutionary Computing Conference (Lisbon 2005)

Poster Presentation. Bern 4 April 2007

 

Substituting the former dinosaurs by trees reverts global warming and climate changes

Ronald MALDONADO RODRIGUEZ1, Yuxin YUAN2, Reto J. STRASSER3

1. Institute Universitaire d’Etudes du Développement, 63 Rue de Lausanne, Genève 1202, Suisse. e-mail: [email protected] http://www.fluoromatics.com

2. College of Forestry, Agricultural University of Hebei, Baoding 071000  Hebei, P.R. China. E-mail: [email protected] http://www.hebau.edu.cn

3. Laboratory of Bioenergetics, University of Geneva, 10 Ch. des Embrouchis, Jussy, Geneva CH-1254, Switzerland. email: [email protected] http://www.unige.ch/sciences/biologie/bioen

Eighth Swiss Global Change Day. Bern 4 April 2007

 

 

Scientific Journal cover pages designed by Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez

I love drawing and painting. All the graphic design included in the software that I have written has been done entirely by me. I have made some cover designs for several scientific journals. For having a look at one of these covers please follow the links below:

Functional Plant Biology Vol. 30, Number 7, 2003

 

Web sites created by Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez

The Bioenergetics Laboratory of the University of Geneva. The website I designed was destroyed by some guy who decided to make a new non-functional, terribly ugly, with an incredible bad taste… It’s a pity. Ancient Greeks used to say: “Only the wild and the savage destroy what is useful”.

 

The Microbiology Laboratory of the Plant Biology department at the University of Geneva. The same guy who destroyed the web page above destroyed the webpage of Microbiology and did not take care about making a new web page for the Microbiology research group. I am so sorry for Francois Barja and his research team...

 

Fluoromatics Software Website: Scientific Software, Consulting, Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis, Biolyzer web page.

 

El Pulpo Studio. This Web site was designed for Benedicto Garcia, a graphic artist living in Geneva and good friend of Ronald.

 

Ronald Maldonado Rodriguez on the NEWS

Baillod, P. M. & Martini, G. O. Environmental assays by photosynthetic fluorescence. Bioworld 2, 2001. www.bioworld.ch. ISSN 1424-8514.

The APTE (Association for the Application and Promotion of Electronic Technologies) published an article in the BioWorld Europe Magazine about the work that Ronald did at the Bioenergetics Laboratory of the University of Geneva, Switzerland. You can read it in English or French. It is quite interesting and very informative.

 

 

See Fluoromatics Web Site

See Biolyzer Official Web Site here

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Last modification on 15 April 2009 at 16:27h

 

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