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Topic: R1 forum database (1 of 30), Read 2097 times 
Conf: R1 tech info - read only
From: Deleted () 
Date: Monday, January 10, 2000 09:44 PM 

Topic: R1 Forum Database (1 of 3), Read 41 times
Conf: R1 Forum Misc....
From: Lee Logan (lee.logan@gulfaero.com)
Date: Monday, January 10, 2000 03:15 PM

You will quickly figure out as you use the Database, that I did not copy everything ever put on the Forum. For a long time, I only copied things that I was personally interested in (I already had a shimmy damper, for example, so I didn’t copy much early on, on that subject). Later, when I got the idea to put the Database on-line, I started copying pretty much everything I thought would be of interest to the average Forum member. For that reason, there are some “holes” in the data. I believe in spite of that, you will still find the Database fairly comprehensive, with at least some information on virtually every subject ever discussed on the Forum.

Limitations: Obviously, I can’t vouch for the validity or value of any of the material contained in the Database. In some cases, I copied info that was questioned in subsequent posts. In many cases, I got the dissenting information in as well, but I can’t guarantee that in every case. I did my best to select only uncontested data, the best data, or at least data where both views made a lot of sense. Those I leave to your own judgement. Also, early on, I didn’t bother with copying the name of the poster along with the data. If it sounded reasonable and believable to me, I put it in. Later, I began to copy the name of the person who posted it, in order to provide a sense of the value of each particular post. You will find posts of each type in the Database. In rare cases, you will find the same post in two different places. I did that a couple of times in order to aid in finding posts or info that cross topic boundaries.

Many of the URL’s in the Database are direct links. Some were not posted as direct links when displayed on the Forum in the first place, so that’s the way I got them. Someone may get energetic and fix those that don’t auto-link, but if not, I don’t consider that a real limitation. Just copy the link into your web browser’s “Address” line and hit return. You can then of course, save any you find particularly useful as “Favorites” (Microsoft Explorer) or “Bookmarks” (Netscape), or re-copy it off your browser address line back into the Database. That should fix that. I tried to color code all URL’s, e-mail addresses, and phone numbers to make them a little easier to find. The “code” is on the right hand side of the “Index” page.

You are free to copy the Database into your own computer and then to modify or add to it as you like. I will continue to update it regularly and will post an updated version at the link site from time to time. I will post a notice on the Forum when I do that so you can copy the new one if you want. Alternatively, of course, you can just use this one as your own “base database”, and delete what you don’t care about and upgrade/update it with only the posts that are of interest to you. I’m hoping that the Database will be particularly helpful to new members; at the very least, we should be able to direct them to the Database for answers to some of the questions we commonly get from newcomers. Maybe it will help us not to have to plow new ground so often.

Finally, a couple of guys have questioned the wisdom of displaying the Database in Microsoft Excel, suggesting that many (most?) Forum members will not be familiar with it, or even have it on their systems. Unfortunately, that is the only serious database/format with which I am familiar. There are many others, of course. I will have to leave any subsequent conversion effort to someone on the Forum who is more computer experienced than I. I hope most won’t find this to be a serious limitation. Excel is readily available, easy to learn (the basics, anyway), and bundled in Microsoft Office. It pretty much comes with just about every new PC sold these days, I’m told.

Hope everyone finds the Database useful and will consider contributing to it over time.

SHILO


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Topic: database - 1- Index (1) (2 of 30), Read 2079 times 
Conf: R1 tech info - read only
From: Deleted () 
Date: Sunday, January 16, 2000 12:14 AM 

1. Manufacturer Related
Yamaha
Links (provided by Forum members)

2. Bike Related
Parts Suppliers
Accessories
Exhaust systems/Hangars
Windshields
Rearsets
Seats
Body Pieces, Fairings, Bras, Chassis, Nuts & Bolts
Frame sliders (mushrooms)
Handle Bar Mods
Dussault Products, Techniques
Design/Painting/Helmet Painting
Wheel Stands
Titanium nuts and bolts

3. Horsepower Related
Running In
Carburetors: Jetting, Idle, Adjustment
Carb Synchronization
Ignition
Air Intake, Airboxes
Cams
Tuners/Engine Builders
Turbos, Nitrous, Big Bore Kits
Hardware
Dyno Runs, Results, Use, Tuner Tips, Math, Big Bore Kits

4. Exup

5. Suspension Related
Suspension Equipment
Forks, Triple Clamps
Shocks, Linkage, Swingarm
Sprockets, Chains, Cush Drives
Shimmy Dampers
Suspension Setup Info and Support
 

6. Suspension Set-up
Recommended Suspension Settings
Suspension Setup
Rider Suspension Comments

7. Wheel Related
General
Pressures
Metzler
Dunlop
Michelin
Pirelli
Tires General
Punctures, Patches
Tire Dealers, Discount Tire Dealers
Wheels
Alignment
Forum Members Comments on Tires
Brakes
Sprockets, Chains, Cush Drives

8. Modifications
Forum members suggested modification priorities
Racing Modifications
Semoff Bros. Racing
Trade Secrets: Cycle Improvements
General Performance
Carburation/Needles/Etc.
Cranks
Clutch, Transmission
Radiator, Cooling
Electric/Air Shifters, Shift Lights
Anti-Theft
Lighting, Signal Flasher mods
Fairing Mods, Frame Slider Installation
Repairs, Polishing
Plastic
Polishing
Painting Tires
Books, Manuals, Videos
Miscellaneous
 

9. Maintenance Related
Warranty
Oil Company Sites
Oil/Changing oil
Brake Fluid/Changing Brake Fluid
Bearings
Diagnostics, Troubleshooting
EXUP Troubleshooting, Exhaust Leaks
Chain Maintenance
Forum Member Maintenance Comments/Tips/etc.
R1 Weight

10. Riding
Routes
Traffic Tickets
Radar Detectors/Mounts
Riding Schools/Racing
Tricks, Wheelies, Stoppies, Burnouts...
Racing, Drag Racing, Launching Tips/Speed Techniques
Shipping Your Bike

11. Apparel and Supplies
Leathers
Custom Made Suits
Production Suits, Gloves
General Motorcycle Apparel
General Apparel
Helmets
Gloves
Aftermarket, Supplies, Minor Mods
General Motorcycle Parts & Accessory Suppliers
Lights, bulbs
Cleaners, Polish
Batteries
Heated Grips
Hoses/Clamps
Models, Miniatures, Games, Videos
Video Cameras, Mounts
Insurance
Miscellaneous
 

Forum Stickers: Deidre Cuevas, 38 Trenton Ct., Wilkes Barre, PA 18702: $5.00
 
 


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Topic: database - 1- Manufacturers (1) (6 of 30), Read 2170 times 
Conf: R1 tech info - read only
From: Deleted () 
Date: Sunday, January 16, 2000 12:32 AM 

Manufacturer's Data
Yamaha

 1
http://www.yamahausa.com/
2
http://www.yzfr6.com
3
http://www.yamaha-racing.com
4
http://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/start-e.html
5
http://www.yamaha-motor-europe.com
6
http://www.yzfr7.com

 Underlined URL's automatically link to the Internet

 Links provided by forum members.

 1
http://www.his.com/~harris/teamchm.htm
Team Charm
Connect to Team Charm: They have a link there with hundreds of phone numbers and other connections
2
http://www.his.com/~harris/shops.htm
A direct link to the same phone list Note: These will be replaced soon with a searchable list
3
http://www.yzf-r1-forum.com:8080/~yzfr1
YZF-R1 Forum
4
exup-on@lists.exupbrotherhood.com
EXUP Brotherhood
5
http://dragbike.com/index.html
Site dedicated to motorcycle drag racing
6
http://www.motorcycle.com/
Motorcycle Online
7
http://www.motoworld.com/
Motoworld Network
8
http://www.execpc.com/~ytk/
North American Sportbike Road Registry
9
http://www.sbo.co.za/
Sportbike Online
10
http://www.motorcycleworld.co.uk/preview/main_index.htm
11
http://fourps.wharton.upenn.edu/~simon/r1/ R1 Mailing List page
12
www.ventura-bike.com
Rear rack system for most any bike including the R1
13
http://ircalc.usps.gov
Postal shipping rate calculator
14
http://www.motograndprix.com
500cc GrandPrix racing site
15
http://www.superbike.it
World Superbike site
16
http://www.2wf.com
2WF: "The most popular online motorcycle magazine in America"
17
http://home.mira.net/~iwd/
Couldn't get this one to work!
18
http://members.tripod.com/~YZFR1_2/rpm.html
Greg Crowe's site
19
http://www.moto-directory.com/highperf.htm
Links to lot's of other motorcycle sites
20
http://www.dakotacom.net/~robertz/yamaha_page.html
Big Dawg's page
21
http://minimopar.simplenet.com/oilfilterstudy.html
Filter comparison
22
http://www.onlinemicrofiche.com
On line microfiche location
23
http://www.nrcracing.com
Niagra Race Crafters, Inc. Wide range of aftermarket racing parts and engine services
24
http://www.buyacam.com/
Upstate Nannycams: Hidden video cameras and related equipment
25
http://www.revibo.com
Titanium Performance: Titanium and aluminum bolts, and "other racing products"
26
http://vision.traderonline.com/auto/
Trader Online: Cars, boats, bikes, planes, etc.
27
miket660@thehub.com.au Mike T's email and http://www.thehub.com.au/~oldbat41/ and Mike's homepage
28
http://www.contextshift.force9.co.uk/bikes/R1/r1faqmain.htm#miscellaneous
29
http://www.pembroke.u-net.com/superbike/index.html
Unofficial Superbike Magazine website
30
http://www.voxan.com
Voxan motorcycles: France
 

Parts Suppliers

1
Competition Accessories - 800/543-5141

2
Lockhart Phillips - www.lockhartphillipsusa.com

3
Motorcycle Accessory Warehouse - www.accwhse.com

4
www.street-n-comp.com/index2.htm


6
Kiernan Racing Supplies http://www.braincell.com/kiernan/

7
Internet Motorcycle Parts: www.cycle-parts.com

8
Kiernan Racing Supplies http://www.braincell.com/kiernan/

9
http://www.jamparts.com German Akropvich dealer; prices in DM, large inventory

10
Doug Laube WCC Wholesale 800 438-7921 Fax 828 452-5834 Good parts prices

11
http://www.hardcoreracing.com T-shirts, die cast models, and motorcycle parts and accessories

12
If you need parts for your bike, contact Mark at 800-438-7921, tell him you've got an R1 and he'll give you a bottom price.

13
To set up a 20% discount account, you can contact Patrick with Riva Yamaha, at 800-241-4544 ext 325. Tell him you are a Forum member.

14
http://www.mondusmotorsports.com/whats_new.html

15
http://www.mihara.co.jp Specialty equipment supplier. Has an aluminum tank for the R1 for $1,600

16
All those kit parts are available in Canada, I have seen some, like ignitor, cams and such, Pilons bike made 164hp on a dynojet dyno when it was done.
To order stuff, call Fast Company - 519-651-3315, they did Pilons bike, and Kevin Graham's, and I am sure you could order through them, or http://www.cycleimprovements.com 519-888-7450 he also sells aftermarket stuff, sells and ships.

17
http://www.factorypro.com/ Factory Pro

18
http://www.rivayamaha.com Riva Yamaha: Good source, discount parts and first class service.

Accessories
Exhaust systems/Hangars

1
Micron 888-963-1212 Micron Oval is supposed to be very nice Micron Carbon Round slipon: $399

2
Yoshimura http://www.yoshimura-rd.com/98/performance/mjnkits.html Jet Kit: $119 909 628 4722

3
MIG 285 rue Laennec BP 299 Phone: 33-4 -94 14 79 79 For the MIG exhaust pipe
ZI TOULON EST 83078 TOULON CEDEX 9 Fax: 33-4- 94 08 23 08

4
M4 full system + minor jetting changes = 13 hp.

5
Eurotail and MIG pipes: http://www.eurobikes.com Tel: (703) 257-9500
Contact Person: Manny, Info: Mention you are from the R1 Forum.

6
Hein-Gericke aluminum muffler hanger: http://www.hein-gericke.de
Order Number: 22008088; cost 99.95DM
7
http://www.cmracing.com/english/akrapovic.html

8
http://www.jamparts.com/Ak1e.htm Good site with Akropovic products, dyno runs, etc.

9
Zero anodized titanium slip-on: Revolution UK Attn: Roger Ditchfield, Unit 19 Hanson Close Business Park Middleton, Grt Manchester M24 2HD
Tel 44-161-655-4020 Fax 44-1706-373982

10
M4 full systems: $619 for the stainless with aluminum can is about as cheap as you can find them. That was from Star Cycle.

11
M4: CALL NORTHCOAST PERFORMANCE. TELL DAVE GEORGE SENT YOU AND HE WILL GIVE YOU A GREAT PRICE. 800-364-0619

12
Hein Gericke has very nice aluminum exhaust hangers (without the rear pegs)

13
Buy the Akrapovic. Star Cycle should give you the best price. The Yosh is nice but consider this:
Akrapovic = 4-1 system
4-1 system = smoother low end with less low end torque dip. I have the M4 and would buy the Akrapovic if I had to do it all over again.

14
Muzzy's pipe is now available and its 4-1 with a few tricks. I got one on order. I have to wait because they aren't making the full ti system until Nov, '99.
Retail is $852 with the oval CF can. Retail for the round CF, and round ti is $795

15
THE best R1 exhaust system according to Greg Crowe who ought to know: Akrapovic stainless steel system with full titanium can, part # 4235607.

16
www.topgear.de Akropovich and other gear

17
The Yosh full titanium system weighs only 7 lbs, where the stainless version weighs about 11 lbs. You will have to decide if the weight savings afforded by the full titanium system is worth the price difference. The performance characteristics are identical between the two pipes, the only difference is the material. Dealer cost on that pipe is $1,180.00, so there should be some room for a discount of sorts, if you have a good relationship with your dealer.
Santo Jannotti

18
Every Akra exhaust that I have installed, fit perfect, although there were a couple that were a little close to the lower cowl on the left side, I just installed a little heat tape and there were no problems at all, (95% did not need the heat tape). Also, if you don't "shake fit" the pipe and make sure that all the connections are seated all the way and "relaxed", I guess you could have some problems. One more thing, the carbon muffler clamp must be installed with the muffler closer to the swingarm, but on the outside of the peg bracket. If you have an aftermarket muffler hanger, then you must check to see that the pipe fits properly.....
don't assume that the pipe will fit the same, you may have to do a little bending, or make some spacers. My bike and everyone else's that I have worked on says that the bike runs cooler with the pipe.
Ivan

19
When you put titanium pipes together you should use a high temp silcon to help stop leaks. Yamahabond 6s is sold by yamaha dealers it is silver and works great. Be sure the pipe does not bind at all or rub against anything. the vibration from the motor will break your pipe due to the fact Titanium likes to shatter if it is rubbing against your body work or etc. The pipe needs to almost be free floating. Be sure gaskets are in the head when you install new pipe.

 20
I just got the Muzzy exhaust on and had my dealer jet it with a Yosh MJN kit and the results are great! I haven't gotten it on the dyno yet, hopefully in a week or so, but there a no noticeable flat spots and it has a much improved midrange to topend...I'm really satisfied with the results, sounds great too. The overall construction of the pipe is very good, solid welds, nicely shaped...BUT, it was a HUGE pain to get it fitted properly, you need an extra set, or two, of hands to get it done, and the s-bend pipe contacts the lower fairing right above where the stock exhaust used to exit so you either have to cut a small piece of plastic or let the pipe make it's own. It's small so it's not a huge concern, I was just surprised Muzzy didn't use the stock exit.
 

Windshields

1
Zero Gravity http://www.zerogravity-racing.com/r1.htm

2
Givi Profile DH121 comes in light smoke and is 2 to 3 inches taller than stock. Cost: $71.50.

3
Pyramid Plastics screen (clear) mounting holes are 3-5mm too far towards the center of the bike on each side. To fit, you have to push the fairing toward middle to get the holes to line up.

4
I have fitted a new screen to my R1 - an "AirFlow" screen by PowerBronze plastics. It looks really cool, and manages to push the wind over my head.

5
QB Carbon in the U.K. has a flip up windscreen for the R1.

6
Powerbronze windshield: Better wind and rain protection, but more wind noise

7
http://www.MRA-klement.de windscreens

Rearsets

1
For solid pegs: I got mine from Eric Wood @ Woodcraft. The look very similar to the ones on CFM's aftermarket rearset (may even be the same now that I think about it). 508-339-5772

Make sure he sends you the right bolts. The ones without the shoulders.

2
QB Carbon products and ProMach rearsets are offered in the US by Formula 1 Motorsports. 516-969-9480. They are located in Bay Shore, New York.

3
The Promach non-adjustable rearsets retain the shift rod through the frame. I have a set of the adjustable Promachs and they are extremely well engineered and well made with very precise operation. The levers pivot on roller bearings and the tolerances are very tight. They are adjustable to nine different peg positions, and the shift lever is adjustable to three positions, independent of the pegs. They are the only ones I've seen that are comparable to Attacks, but unlike the Attacks, they are anodized rather than raw aluminum billet.

4
I have the ProMach non-adjustable rearsets, and am very impressed with the quality. They have ball bearings for both the shifter as well as the brake lever, and are very smooth in operation. They are setup to use the stock brakelight setup, and are a straight bolt-on affair. I have seen the adjustable models in person, and the quality is just as good as the fixed-position ones. I did not buy them, as I don't care for the appearance of nine holes in a grid pattern, that most adjustable rearsets have. The pegs are in pretty much the stock position. The only advantages, are lighter weight, and the rigid pegs are shorter than stock, offering increased cornering clearance.

5
Over, Attack Performance, Harris, and Promach rearsets all got good reviews. Promach best performance/value, maybe?

6
Sharkskinz reverse shift rod. Works great!Screwed in just about all the way on both ends. You must take off the shift shaft lever and the foot peg and shift pedal. Wrap the rod with something to keep it from getting nicked where it goes through the frame. For 26 bucks its well worth it. Much cheaper than rearsets.

7
Attack Racing makes a reverse shifting linkage that keeps the stock rod through the frame - very trick.

Seats

1
http://www.second-look.com Second Look seat and pillion cover for R1 is available

Body Pieces, Fairings, Bras, Chassis, Nuts & Bolts

1
http://www.iinet.com/users/advcomp/ Custom carbon fiber replacement parts:

2
Yamaha part # for the single seat cowl: Red/White IQG-00028-73-20, Blue IQG-00029-73-20

3
FAST COMPANY. They make carbon fiber pieces Ask for Mike Sears at (828)-327-2644.

4
Euro tail: FRANCE ACCESSOIRES 10800 St JULIEN DES VILLAS
Fax : 33-3-25 75 49 28
1 bis rue Voltaire
Phone: 33-3-25 75 24 12
May sell Eurotail direct from JMV

5
Eurotail JMV CONCEPT
13881 GEMENOS CEDEX
Phone: 33-4 42 32 23 24

BP 141
Fax : 33-4 42 32 04 93

6
I have the Euro Bikes tail on my 99 R1. Once I finally received and installed it, I am happy with it. Dealing with Eurobikes is a headache in a half. It took about 3 months to come in. And the installation instructions are practically useless.

If you purchase this, I strongly recommend a device from Lockhart Phillips to go along with it. It is called the 'Integrator Kit'. This kit will make your 2 rear lights into turn signals, so you don't have to attach new signals. It is very sweet.

7
Eurobikes just released a new undertail for the 98/99 r1 with flush mounted rear turn signals on each side of the brake lights.received mine in less than a week.I think it looks better than the others.
8
http://www.eurobikes

9
Best carbon fiber in the world comes from Tand T in Hickory NC. Call and ask for Todd 828 323-1277

10
http://www.yoginelli.com

11
Jeff Russell
Intuitive Race Products
http://www.IntuRace.com   (949) 586-0514
Jeff@IntuRace.com Also rear axle spacers for perfect chain adjustments!

12
QB Carbon
Unit 2, Hollygate Lane, Cotgrave
Nottingham NG12 3JW
England
Promach rear sets. 265 U.K. pounds, minus VAT

13
Carbon fiber tank for R1: $950.00 in carbon fiber, $920.00 in carbon fiber/kevlar. Made by Carbo-Tech, and distributed by Yoyodyne Titanium. (908) 687-0261

UPDATE :
It said Yoyodyne Ti was selling CarboTech parts, but when I Emailed them they said they were made by another company (NOT Carbotech)- I think they said it was a company in Spain. You may want to check with them to see who makes their parts.
checking . . .

14
Erospace Technologies Inc. also has carbon fiber tanks for the R1
http://members.aol.com/fuelcel/Yamaha.html

15
Yamaha Racing Carbon chain guard
Part # GYR-IQG87-00-CF
List Price $210.95 Canadian funds or approx. $140 U.S.

16
QB Carbon has a Ram Air box that has a distributor in Md.
718-476-7777, this # is in Bayshore New York but they own the QB distributor in Md.

17
R1 fuel cell from a company called Fuel Cel (carbon fiber/kevlar): 4.5 lb at 561 388-0966 Saves 7.75#

18
Intuitive Race Products have a quick release seat and tank system
949-586-0514
26895 Aliso Creek Road, Suite B436
Also frame sliders and a lot of other good stuff . .
Aliso Viejo, CA 92656

19
Blue headlight covers: Ramsey Kawasaki-Yamaha-Suzuki in New Jersey. (201) 825-3333. Ask for Reinaldo. $15

20
Shorty fexible turn signals white yellow lense part (1201) $24.95 black yellow lense part (1202) $24.95 800-221-9752

21
http://www.scorpion-exhausts.com for a radiator protector around $35-40 US dollars.

22
Second Look tank bra (red/white R1) and I think it great. It hasn't scuffed my tank up either. I paid about $70.00 for it from Competition Accessories.

23
If you want the Lockhart turn signals to work properly, (flash at the right speed) you must install a load stabilizer also. I purchased mine through Drag Specialties.

24
Fairing components at good prices:
upper fairing $200
cowl braket $106
rear cover $101
Near Asheville, NC: 800 226 8012 Kevin
left middle $142
lower left $204

25
Correct blue R1 paint:
http://www.color-rite.com/
Color-Rite Distributing (800)736-7980

5815 Yamaha 564: Deep Purplish Blue Metallic

26 Air tech web site: www.motobody.com

27
15% discount on Sharkskinz products for all Forum members: Call Dave @ 561-388-9621 and tell him you are a member.

28
Ermax underseat tray, available by post from M & P Accessories in England, cost £55 plus shipping, tel. 01792 224452. Quality is good

29
Getting the speedo off (and on) is a bit of a pain - remove screen, ratchet right-angle drive short pozidrive bit and three screws out - pull rubber cover back cable plug - remove plug whilst pressing little plastic bit on top to release latch. Then just putting it all back is a reverse of the above.

30
Excellent Dzus fasteners from DFS International, Orlando, Florida. $3 each. Two different finishes. The part number 316-415-191 (that's the correct length for the R1).
DFS phone # is (407)-858-9848 and their website http://www.dfsintl.com/

31
Use a moly based grease, per the recommendation of Fred Renz at Yoyodyne Titanium for installing titanium bolts.

32
If you are in need of racing plastic or any aftermarket parts you may want to check with Northwest Cycle at http://www.nwcycle.com. 877-692-9253.
They carry inexpensive racing body panels.

33
Go to http://www.MandP.com for anti-seize lubricant made for preventing titanium bolts from cold-welding to aluminum surfaces or casings. Called ti-prep, it is a "finish line "product,and part #is FLT10150101 for the 18gram tube, and FLT10240101 for the 1.5lb. tube.

34
The same stuff in a 500g (~1 lb) can costs US$10. Much less than repackaged Ti-Prep, it's the same as the copper anti seize packed by LPS, LockTite brand, etc.

35 Good quality moly grease is fantastic general-purpose stuff, but that ugly copper stuff is the absolute best to prevent galling in titanium nuts and bolts.

36
yoyodyne ( http://www.yoyodyneti.com )
Has some rear/front axles for the ones who got the money;
front$375 usd
rear$350 usd
Already nitride coated with teflon covered threads for some application. they have the whole bike in nuts and bolts.

37
The Kawasaki part number for a radiator guard that will fit the R1 perfectly is 14037-1198: think its from a 1995 gpz 1100

38

Framesavers, etc.

39
I got LED's from Jaycar in Australia, http://www.jaycar.com.au/ (They sell on the net.)

40
http://www.colorrite.com Colorite touchup paint (pens, aerosols, small bottles, whatever).

41
For D-zus fasteners for the R1: http://www.dfsintl.com/ part # 316-415-191

42
Factory makes billet aluminum case covers. Left side replaces the stock generator cover, the right side replaces the ignition rotor cover (but you still get to keep your inspection cover).

43
Nuts and bolts resource: http://www.fastenal.com

44
YZF1000 96-97 aluminum chain guard can be modified to work on the R1. Very nice.

45
I recently purchased some D-Ring Fairing fasteners and really like them. Here is a old Picture of Robert's bike for those that want to see them. They are kind of hard to see unless you enlarge the picture, but they are there.

Anyway they are a nice touch.

I picked up 12 of them. Cost was $60. They come in packs of 4 $20/pack. I got them from street-n-comp.

http://www.street-n-comp.com

46
Use a moly based grease, per the recommendation of Fred Renz at Yoyodyne Titanium for installing titanium bolts.

47
http://www.dzus.com Dzus fastener resource

48
http://www.airtech-streamlining.com

49
Troy said:
I didn't see any mention of the mirror bracket covers I sell, maybe I just missed it? Since it is a unique and "YZF exclusive" product not sold by anyone else I figure it should qualify :)
http://users.cnmnetwork.com/~tpgreen/forsale.htm
Troy Green
How was that, Troy? 8-) Mike.
 

Frame sliders (mushrooms)

1
Mail order from Sound Distribution on +44 (0) 1254 248 754

2
Thru fairing mushrooms: CIRCUIT ONE SUSPENSION, 1415 VANBUREN, OREGON CITY, OR. 97045, 503 722 8475

3
http://www.wrmengr.com WRM engineering.
Santa Rosa CA.95406
P.O.Box 6622
(707) 542-5232
Frame sliders and solid foot pegs

Handle Bar Mods

1
Two Brothers adjustable clips ons.
006-V3-50C V.3 50mm clamp kit 179.98
006-V3-B Racing handlebars $84.98
Total $264.96

2
Custom clip ons:
MVR 5203 1st street suite B
Bremerton, Wa
360-792-1292

3
Heli-Bars 800-859-4642 $230 USD I think?
http://www.helibars.com
Two Brothers Racing 714-550-6070
http://www.twobros.com $265 USD
The 2 Bros clip on's are fully adjustable and they are a little longer for more leverage. I have not measured but the ends of my bars sit noticeable higher than stock. I have ridden 440 miles in 8 hours without having sore wrists.(4 days later I rode the same distance in 7 hours). You can't use your stock bar ends because they are hollow. you will have to drill a couple small hole so you can mount your controls. so take a picture of them where they are before pull your stock clip ons off. you will have to take you triple clamp off so you are going to need a 36 mm socket (I think) and a rubber hammer. For bar ends, they sell them with a rubber plug that expands as you tighten the allen bolt holding the bar ends in the bar. you can use that same rubber piece in any bar end. There are some earlier post on clip on's.

Dussault Products, Techniques

1
With the Dussalt tail you need a Tridon EL-12C electronic flasher unit. Takes all of 10 minutes to pop the stock unit off and replace it with the Tridon.

2
Robert Dussalt: http://www.mtl.clubplus.net/~grart/
215 Rene.A.Robert,suite 102
St-Therese,Quebec,Canada
J7E 4L1
(450) 437-3046

3
On the Dussault tail: DO paint the light housing black like Robert suggests, or you WILL be taking it back apart to do it later. Don't ask why I know this.

Also, you will need to switch either the bulbs in the turn signals, or the flasher relay. The lights will flash too quickly after the install. The bulbs need to be 20 watts, OR the relay needs to be changed to a Tridon EL12-c. You will find the flasher relay mounted under the seat. They are cheap (under 10 bucks) and available in most any auto parts store. This info came straight from Robert himself.

4
By far, the easiest solution is to install 20 watt bulbs. If you do it, they will flash at the proper rate, with no other modifications necessary.
Santo

5
Get a Sears rotary tool (Dremel) with a flexible shaft to use when you install a Dussault tail. Very helpful.

Design/Painting/Helmet Painting

6
B.K.B. Good helmet painter, but address is old. Might not be good any more. B.K.B. = Bob's Crazy Brush

3393 E19 St.
St. Longbeach, Ca. 90804
310-494-6488
310-494-7288 fax

7
Mike Taylor Designs - Another good helmet painter.
1692 Tacoma Way
Ste: 1
Redwood City, Ca. 94063
415-369-7585

8
I recommend calling Rick Briggs at Off Beat Productions (916)645-7520, local friend. He Paints helmets for Larry Pegram, Tommy and Nicky Hayden, Jamie Hacking and a few others I can not think of right now. Also Paints all Erion Racing's plastics for race bikes, and painted the Kevin Schantz bike Cycle Gear is giving away. ( Looks like Schantz Helmet) Rick is a real good Guy. He may not be as busy now that the AMA season is over.

9
http://www.california-designs.com/weekly1.htm
California Designs: Custom bike painting, accessories

10
R7 tank decal part number is 5FL-2413B-00-00.

11
Tamiya paint TS-50 Mica Blue is an exact match with my Blue R1. Note: Others have said "not quite".
 

Wheel Stands

1
Pit Bull - - Full Sprectrum Design: Charlie Van Valkenburgh 205-533-1977

2
Full bike jack stand: Sycamore Services (+44) 1603 260340 - - 75 quid

3
Very nice front and rear stands (especially the under yoke front). Prices seem very good: http://www.randrracing.com
R & R Racing
224 Jennings Ave
Greenacers FL, 33463
888-782-7676
FAX: 561-641-7807
 

Titanium nuts and bolts

1
http://www.yoyodyneti.com

2
Use a moly based grease, per the recommendation of Fred Renz at Yoyodyne Titanium for installing titanium bolts.

3
http://www.MandP.com for anti-seize lubricant made for preventing titanium bolts from cold-welding to aluminum surfaces or casings. Called ti-prep,it is a "finish line "product, and part #is FLT10150101 for the 18 gram tube, and FLT10240101 for the 1.5lb. tube.

M&P Motorcycle Accessories, Ltd.

4
The same stuff in a 500g (~1 lb) can costs US$10. Much less than repackaged Ti-Prep, it's the same as the copper anti seize packed by LPS, LockTite brand, etc.

Good quality moly grease is fantastic general-purpose stuff, but that ugly copper stuff is the absolute best to prevent galling in titanium nuts and bolts.
 

Running in
It's been a lot of discussion of the running in process, both on the Danish newsgroup for motorcycles and a lot of other places too. When I received my bike, I had a talk with Brit tuners TTS among others, read a few articles, and a chapter in Camerons book; Sportbike Performance Tuning, available at Amazon for $15 or so.

The essence of all these articles, as well as the tuners recommendations, was that the information in the R1 manual probably was a bit on the conservative side.

I was recommended to give the engine a bit more load and revs than the 5K Yamaha claim is OK. I was told to avoid hard load of the engine, and high revs should be constrained to short bursts of just a few seconds.

For the first 200 miles, I followed the exact recommendation in the Yamaha manual. Then I gradually let the engine rev a bit more, only in 1st gear, and never for more than a few seconds. At 500 miles, I had seen 8-9K in 1st, I had never babied the engine, but never pushed it either. I gradually increased the revs until I had done 1000 miles or so, and during the dame period, as the mileage increased, I let the engine rev a little higher, and a little harder.

I discussed this on the Danish group before I started this process, and many people warned me about it. I was told I could get high oil consumption, that the ceramic bores on the Yamaha could be damaged (funny enough, a tuner told me that if I babied it too much, I would not get proper seal at the rings, especially not with the hard ceramic bores...), and power would not be good.

Since I'd always followed the factory recommendations on my previous bikes, and none of them had seem to be particularly strong or well running (oil consumption), I took the chance, and trusted the information I received from the "pros".

It seem like it paid off. The engine has now run 9000 miles, uses no oil under normal driving, and is definitely not weaker now than it was 7000 miles ago. I've run on both semi-synthetic and fully synthetic oil, and it makes no difference to consumption. On a trip from Germany to Denmark, where I pressed the bike extremely hard on the Autobahn and Danish motorways, the engine used 2dl oil in 2000km. I think this is OK, especially since the R1 have forged pistons, which normally tend to give a bit higher consumption than an engine with cast pistons. This is due to tolerances, where a forged piston normally need a bit more clearance than its cast counterpart.
 

Joerund Seim

Running in
I agree with Joerund, and will be using a somewhat similar approach when breaking in my engine. If the engine is treated too gently when first run, you will develop a layer of extremely hard glazing on the cylinder walls, that will make it all but impossible for the rings to EVER seal as good as possible. Frequent bursts of throttle up to redline (But not holding it there), followed by deceleration, will allow the rings to wear slightly, giving you the beginnings of a good seal that should last for thousands of miles.
Santo Jannotti

Carburetors: Jetting, Idle, Adjustment

1
With any aftermarket exhaust, you will get this to some degree (sputtering below 3,000 rpm with a full exhaust system), a 4-1 does it the least, if I made the needle leaner so it wouldn't do that, then it wouldn't pull nearly as hard from 4000 and up, it's always a trade-off, this is where I felt the best compromise is. To minimize it you can try lowering the needle 1/2 a clip position, but first you need to make sure that your main jet is not too rich. You need to see which pulls better... the 130 or, the 132, then change your clip position, IT MUST BE DONE IN THAT ORDER, because when you change the main, you change the mixture throughout the rpm range, even though it has its most effect above 9000.
Ivan

2
With the stock exhaust system, the jetting is 99.9% perfect.......don't mess with it. With a slip-on, just shimming the needles .020" seems to be the ticket (note: Later tuning experimentation with slip-ons suggests Ivan's needles are a better way to go than shimming)

3
M4 system, just raise your main jets to a set of Mikuni 132.5's and back your air screws out to 3 1/2 turns and enjoy the extra 13 hp

4
MIG Slip-on: (Depending on elevation), Keep the stock jetting, shim the needles with one DynoJet shim each and set the mixture screw at 3 turns out.

Its been done alot and dyno tested a lot.
.020 is a standard Dynojet shim size

5
Radio Shack "bag-o-washers" for the .02 shims necessary to shim carb needles

6
For carb shims: See your Suzuki dealer and ask for carb needle shims for a late model GSXR750. They're more expensive but they're the right size.

7
http://www.factorypro.com
See site support section; select CV carbs. Shows what symptoms cause what, plus a link to show you the proper way to set float height; also explains why it's necessary.

8
Dyno analysis 101:
An all gear run tests the performance of the main jet. As you are looking at the 3rd, 4th, and 5th gear pulls you may notice that they have a positive slope (HP builds over speed or time) instead of being relatively constant. The ideal all gear run is flat for each gear, but with lots of HP. Lean conditions require the engine to build HP slowly resulting in the upward sloping graph. A rich condition (again, only on the main jet) would have initial high horsepower, but the HP declines due to the abundance of fuel (bogging). In summary, the all gear pull demonstrates the main jet efficiency. Upward sloping indicates a lean condition, downward sloping indicates a rich condition. Flat tells you that main jet is perfect.

9
Proper way to set the pilot screws: The 'quick & easy' way is to set it 3 1/4 turns out from fully seated, which is the factory recommended setting. The most accurate way, is to hook up a vacuum gauge to that one cylinder, and then adjust it 1/8 turn at a time, until you get the highest vacuum reading.

10
The difference between a free flow and exup at sea level is small (no more than one jet size) whereas at 6000ft you would have to be 3-4 jet sizes smaller. With a full pipe and stock needles you need approx. 125's and with Factory (or Dynojet) needles you need approx. 120's at 6000ft ! At that altitude approx. 5 - 8 hp can be re-gained by jetting properly.

11
The fuel mixture screws as they are commonly called , on this bike are actually air/fuel volume adjusting screws. The actual air fuel ratio is set by the size of the pilot jet and pilot air jet. By turning the "fuel mixture screws" you are actually varying the volume of a predetermined air/fuel ratio. These screws have an affect from idle to redline but only in the zero to 1/8th throttle opening. I have found the best setting for this bike to be at 4 turns out from lightly seated.

12 looks like I have to copy this one by hand - appologies for typos - Mike . . .

Great exchange.

I recently bought a Graves m-4 for my R1. Even with 0.0020 spacers under the needles, the area between 3,500 and 4,500 is dead. In fact, the motor sounds like it has a spark plug wire off. The top end is ok, but I can't live with the dead area. Has anyone else had this problem?

Take those shims out from under the needles and raise the main jet size by one instead. There is a flat spot that occurres in that rev range which is as a result of the bike running too rich. This is happening because of the exhaust sound wave bouncing back through the inlet tract and [sending some of the intake charge back out through the carbie - where it picks up a second load of fuel, and coming back in, where it picks up a 3rd load of fuel] ingesting an overly rich mixture as a result. [To some degree] This happens at some point with all 4 - 1 and 4 - 2 - 1 exhaust systems. The only difference is where in the rev range it occurres. Shimming the needles [to correct a lean condition higher in the rev range] will only aggravate because it brings the mains into play earlier.
Santo.

Go leaner on the pilots and floats and then sort out the mains. This is not normal practice with other bikes but removing the EXUP requires that you sort out the bottom end fueling. If you do the mains only, it will indeed be too rich and cause the splutter. Factory recommended that the floats be set to 9mm.
Nigel

Thanks guys, but rather than go through the hassles of jet changes etc., I'm going to sell the system and stay with my Yoshi slip-on, it runs great anyway and I guess now I believe it in EXUP.
Earl

I think you're jumping to conclusions way too soon. I would not get rid of your M4. I also have an M4, and if you change your main jets to 132.5s (taken you have the full system) and back the airscrews out to 3 ~ 3.5 turns - you will love the system. Much better than anything else I have put on the R1.
Greg Crowe

One little tidbit for you. Try synching your carbs before you do anything else.
Mantis

13
An adjustable ignition advancer seems to lean the jetting out (about 1 main jet size per 5-7 degrees advanced).

14
Idle should be around 1100-1200 rpm when fully warmed up. If it's lower than that, turn the idle speed knob clockwise until you reach the desired idle rpm. If it's idleing at the proper rpm and still having problems, the carb synch is probably way out of whack.

15
Set the idle speed with the main screw, and then adjust the mixture screws like I outlined. When you have it right, you will be rewarded with a smooth idle, and crisp throttle response.

16
The "screws" on the R1's carbs: Controls both air, as well as fuel. In=leaner, out=richer.

17
In my opinion, a properly tuned CV carb will outperform a flatslide in every area except total mass air flow, it continually adjusts total airflow preventing overcarburation, it is just as tunable and has all the same circuits as the flatslides, however the manufacturer of the carbs makes a large assortment of tuning parts for the flatslides and very little for the CV's, if you want to come up with your own combination, it is much easier to get the tuning parts for the flatslides and thus easier to come up with your own combination completely independent of a machinist or rely on another tuner, (keeping your results a secret also). In order to have a ramair system function properly the float bowl vents must be routed into the pressurized incoming air stream (filtered and the correct diameter tubing used), and the inlet to the system must be larger than any other part of the inlet tract.(look at Kawasaki's designs especially in the last 3 - 4 years). Of all the aftermarket systems that I have seen for the R1, the only one (In my opinion), that could possibly work is the system from Over Racing. Without a Large area inlet duct that reaches the higher pressure air at the leading edge of the front of the motorcycle's upper cowl, I cannot understand how any of the other systems could even begin to pressurize. You are correct 08R about using large main jets due to decreased velocity (restriction) above the carbs, (my modified box used main jets in the 160 range), this loss of velocity in combination with the steep needle taper and large main jets failed to atomize the fuel properly at low rpms and this is why there was a loss of torque (it still had decent driveability but nonetheless still a loss), It only equalled the stock system at the point where air velocity was high enough to properly atomize the fuel. Suzuki uses an electronically controlled flapper valve inside their airboxes to make their large intake systems work well at more sedate normal driving speeds, when the engine is drawing enough air to become within the operating range of the completely open intake system then the flapper valve opens(I disconnected the vacuum hose to the flapper on the 'busa, it ran terrible below 5000rpm, so I reconnected it). I think that a lot of these principles are good, but how far do you have to go to make them really work?
Ivan
 

18
Oxygen sensor for perfect tuning : http://www.momentum-mc.com/products/aimracing/

19
There are three kinds of Mikuni jets. Hex, large round, and small round. Ivan said to use the small round. I can't find them anywhere local, but Ivan has lots of them for $3 a piece. They fit the "well" in the bottom of the float bowl better, besides its the style jet that Mikuni chose to use in our carbs, I see no reason to use anything else.
Ivan

20
The carbs come stock with Mikuni small head 130 main jets. The heads don't mean anything. A 130 large head is the exact same thing as a 130 small head except for head being larger. I don't even know why Mikuni does that. The head has nothing to do with performance. Every jet I've used on my R1 was a large head only because that's what my local shop stocks.

21
I use the all-gear run hand-in-hand with the 4th gear run to work out jetting. When the jetting is right, the all-gear run will be about 1-2 hp higher than the 4th gear run.

If your 4th gear run gives higher hp than your all-gear run, you are too lean. If you 4th gear run is weak and your all-gear run makes 3hp or more than the 4th gear run, you are too rich.

22
Initially I had #140 Mains, with the needles set at the third clip position (when I installed my Yosh) - no way to open the gas hard below 5,000 rpm. I got the #138 mains, gained 10 ~ 13 hp from the pre-Yoshi setup - still couldn't open the gas hard below 5,000. The pipe was black after a city ride. Mechanic lowered the needles by one notch, thus enriching the lower rpm even more. (I was reluctant but I got that 'What do you know?' look.) I raised the needle's clip two notches and the problem got much better, but still not to my taste. (I found the mechanic forgot to lower the #1 clip by the way.)

So my question is this - Is there some way to lean out the bottom part of the rev band (below 5k) aside from the needle's clip? I still have one clip position I could go on the needles. If I bring the DynoJet needles to the bottom position, will that do something bad?
Speedborg.

You can try lowering the [float] fuel level in 1mm increments, but your problem is probably the needles you have, have got a 0.985" base diameter, compared to the stock 0.995", is where the extra fuel is coming from before the slide begins to lift or is just lifting, thus the larger main jets will cause more fuel to be available - especially at low rpms / large throttle openings, especially with your type of exhaust system (whether you want to hear it or not.)
Ivan

You need to lean out your floats, your mains sound too big and you probably need to go one size larger on your pilots. (17.5s if you have 20s, 15s if you have 17.5s.) If you use the stock airbox you can probably drill out your air jets from 120s to 125s. However you cannot do all of this at once. The procedure should be that you get yourself off to a dyno with a gas anylizer. You set up your floats first then your mains for maximum top end, your needles for maximum 4k ~ 8k, and finally your pilots for bottom end - although at the bottom it's probably more important to get it to pull clean on the dyno in a 4th or 5th gear pull. You also need to do the mixture screws and preferably balance on the mixture screws. (I do the floats according to the jet-kit instructions first, as this also effects the maoins and needles.)
Nigel

23
http://www.summitracing.com for info on Summit's air/fuel monitor. Summit markets one manufactured by MSD. The part number is MSD-8933. Cost is $143.95

24
Carb float height setting information: Before putting my Factory kit in I measured the stock height to be between .260 and .275 inches depending on which carb it was.

I called Marc @ Factory, and he says that the stock float setting, measured from the float bowl gasket surface to the top of the *larger* float, is 7mm. Carbs are inverted for this measurement. Looks like their info agrees with what I measured (.275 in = 7mm). I still cant think in metric when it comes to precise measures.

25
According to the Yamaha service manual, the stock float height is supposed to be between 4.1 and 5.1 mm. Mine were all about 4.5 mm stock. I changed mine to 6 mm and found that it leaned my jetting out throughout the entire rpm range which required a bigger main jet, which made my lower end even worse. Therefor I went back to the stock float height and back down in main jet size.

26
It sure seemed like I lowered mine a lot more than 2 mm. If you're measuring with a caliper make sure you use the same side of the float bowl gasket surfaces. I found a 1 mm difference in the floats from side to side on the floats.

It's also a bitch to keep the thing at a 90 degree angle to the float. I found an easy way to do this for a couple of dollars. I get a shirt pocket 6" ruler with a T-shaped adjustable pocket clip (Home Depo General Tool.) Set it up to the correct height and lock it. The 1/4" blade is easy to keep at a 90 degree angle, and the T just hits the top of the float.

The factory specs of 4.1 to 5.1 mm is using some kind of measuring device that measures the float levels with the carbs all together and full of fuel. This looks like a major pain in the ass and an 8 hour excercise in setting 4 float levels where I want them.

Factory and everyone else takes the bowls off, flips the carb upside down, and measures the distance from the gasket surface to the top of the float. This is supposed to be done without the little spring being depressed but I couldn't see any way possible of seeing exactly what that spring was doing or holding it in any consistent way to take consistent measurements. Therefore, I just turned the carbs upside down, let the float rest in its natural position, and measure all of the floats in their factory preset position, which was about 4.5 mm.

With the carbs upside down, raising the float level has the effect of lowering the fuel level in the bowls and this will makke the mixture go leaner.

Raising the float level is supposed to help hot operation rich conditions at low rpms. It was a complete waste of time for me because by the time you raised your float level and raised your main jet size to compensate for the additional lean condition, the damn larger main jets were screwing up the low end just as much as or more than when you started.

27
The carbs come stock with Mikuni small head #130 main jets. The heads don't mean anything - a 130 large head is exactly the same thing as a 130 small except the head is larger. I don't even know why Minkuni does that. The head size has nothing to do with performance. Every jet I've used on my R1 has been large head because that's what my local shop happens to stock.

28
You can try lowering the [float] fuel level in 1mm increments, but your problem is probably the needles you have, have got a 0.985" base diameter, compared to the stock 0.995", is where the extra fuel is coming from before the slide begins to lift or is just lifting, thus the larger main jets will cause more fuel to be available - especially at low rpms / large throttle openings, especially with your type of exhaust system (whether you want to hear it or not.)
Ivan

29
You need to lean out your floats, your mains sound too big and you probably need to go one size larger on your pilots. (17.5s if you have 20s, 15s if you have 17.5s.) If you use the stock airbox you can probably drill out your air jets from 120s to 125s. However you cannot do all of this at once. The procedure should be that you get yourself off to a dyno with a gas anylizer. You set up your floats first then your mains for maximum top end, your needles for maximum 4k ~ 8k, and finally your pilots for bottom end - although at the bottom it's probably more important to get it to pull clean on the dyno in a 4th or 5th gear pull. You also need to do the mixture screws and preferably balance on the mixture screws. (I do the floats according to the jet-kit instructions first, as this also effects the mains and needles.)
Nigel

30
Stock [pilot jets I think he's talking about]are #20, sometime #17.5. Mine was one of the few with the #17.5. If yours are #14 then they are not stock. I'm not sure who would make #14s as Mikunis go in increments of 2.5. Have another look - I'm almost sure you'll find thay are #20s.

31
P.S. Some people also responded to the above that not all pilot jets were the same. They appear to be different in some countries.

32 [is the same as some of what appeared in #26 - I don't know why. There's been a few things repeated here. I'm copying a lot of this accross by hand so I notice . . .]

The factory specs of 4.1 to 5.1 mm is using some kind of measuring device that measures the float levels with the carbs all together and full of fuel. This looks like a major pain in the ass and an 8 hour excercise in setting 4 float levels where I want them.

Factory and everyone else takes the bowls off, flips the carb upside down, and measures the distance from the gasket surface to the top of the float. This is supposed to be done without the little spring being depressed but I couldn't see any way possible of seeing exactly what that spring was doing or holding it in any consistent way to take consistent measurements. Therefore, I just turned the carbs upside down, let the float rest in its natural position, and measure all of the floats in their factory preset position, which was about 4.5 mm.

With the carbs upside down, raising the float level has the effect of lowering the fuel level in the bowls and this will makke the mixture go leaner.

Raising the float level is supposed to help hot operation rich conditions at low rpms. It was a complete waste of time for me because by the time you raised your float level and raised your main jet size to compensate for the additional lean condition, the damn larger main jets were screwing up the low end just as much as or more than when you started.

33
Do NOT stagger jet the R1, it WILL loose top end hp. Do NOT drill the air displacement holes on the slides, it WILL cause low end driveability to worsen dramatically. Ask me how I know.
Ivan

34
Dynojet offers a viewer that is very similar in function to their own dyno software that you can download (runs in DOS). It cant do everything that the actual dyno software does, but it has all the important bits to compare various runs and change the axes on the graphs. Most dyno operators wont have any problems giving you your runs electronically. It is pretty interesting to play with things like graph smoothing and correction factor.

Playing with both can make changes up to 10hp. Obviously weather has alot to do with power, and the same bike can vary from day to day, but this will allow you to share runs and put your bikes graph next to your buddies for whatever comparison you want to make.
Here is the URL for the viewer and some sample runs:
http://www.dynojet.com/motorcycle/pepview/viewer.htm
It relies on a given file structure. The instruction are here:
http://www.dynojet.com/motorcycle/pepview/viewtrouble.htm

35
For those of you that use Superflo dynoes, they have the same type veiwer available, (but windows) I will email one to anyone that wants one at olinskie@hotmail.com (email me that you want it, and I will send it) and then you can just take a floppy, to the shop, to take info home, with you to the shop, and if like me, other peoples runs to compare.

In case they don't just start at their main site. The domain name is dynojet.

36
In stock form, the air screw are all over the place. I've seen them set from 1/2 a turn out to 3 3/4 turns out. Also, it's not uncommon to see all 4 air screws set in different places from the factory. 3 1/2 turns out seem to be the generally accepted setting for both a slip-on and a full system.

37
To do this [convert decimal INCH heights to millimetres] take your decimal inch measure times (*) 25.4. So, 0.1968 * 25.4 = 5mm. [and to convert the other way, obviously, DIVIDE by 25.4]
 

38
Changing main jets on the R1.
Is this what you are looking for? Not hard at all, here's your step by step instructions (no charge):

  1. Remove seat
  2. Remove tank(don't forget to turn fuel valve off on the back of the tank)
  3. Remove airbox(10mm bolt up front, 1 screw holding it to each carb, vacuum lines).
  4. Move black rubber flap on top of the carbs up out of the way and remove the fuel line and pull the 2 black vacuum tubes off that come in from the top of the carbs.
  5. Now the fun part, getting to the little 3mm screws that hold each carb to the intake. First, take a look at the exup servo unit(by carb #1, left side). It's just slid onto a bracket with a rubber mount. Slide the whole servo unit off the bracket and push it aside, that will give you more room to get to the carb screws.
  6. Get a 3mm allen wrench or a 1/4" drive 3mm allen socket and loosen each screw holding down the carbs (get them very loose). Take your time, it's a bit tight in there.
  7. Once the screws are loose, gently rock the carbs back and forth until they come of the intake manifold.
  8. The little screw/knob that is used for adjusting idle speed is just slid onto a bracket on the left side of the engine. Slide it off its little bracket. This will allow you to pull the carbs away from the intake further and give you more room to work. Unplugging the throttle position sensor will give you extra room too.
  9. You're home free now, rotate the carbs so that the bowls are easier to get to. The bowls are on the end of the carbs that was pointing towards the rear wheel (about 3 1/2" x 2 1/2"). Each bowl is held on by 4 gold phillips screws.
  10. One bowl at a time, remove the 4 screws. They may be a bit tight the first time. The trick to loosening them up is to get a good size allen head screw driver, put the head in the screw, and whack it with a hammer a couple times. This will free up a seemingly stuck screw.
  11. Once you get the bowl off, just unscrew the main jet. The main jet is approx. in the middle of what was covered by the bowl. If you look closely, it will have a small "130" stamped on the end.
  12. Screw your new main jet back in and replace the bowl. Do the next 3 carbs.
  13. Fitting the carbs back onto the intake can sometimes be a bit tricky. It helps for the intake boot screws to be very loose. Try to rock the entire carb assembly back and forth on the boots until you feel each end pop down into the intake boots.
  14. Tighten screws back down, plug throttle position sensor back in if you unplugged it, reinstall fuel line and 2 black vacuum lines (hint, a little WD40 on the vacuum lines and a pair of needle nose pliers will help you get the lines back in place. Put black rubber piece back over the tops of the carbs.
  15. Slide the idle adjustment screw/knob back onto its little bracket.
  16. Reinstall airbox
  17. Reinstall fuel tank, turn on fuel.
Done
Tom

And based on a previous post where the plugs got 'gas fouled' with subsequent broken ceramic insulators, cover the intakes before you tilt the carbs so no gas spills into the cylinders.
DaveJ

Carb Synchronization
1
To synchronize your carbs, there is a 6mm Allen head bolt located on the underside of each intake port, and that is where you attach the carb stix. You will need the 6mm adapters offered by Motionpro, to use them on the R1.

2
How can you tell if your carbs need to be synchronized: Usually, you will need to do it if there is an uneven sound to the idle, or a slight hesitation/stumble at low speed (anywhere from idle up to about 2,000RPM)

3
Carb syncing involves making sure each carb draws the same vacuum at low rpms from closed to partially open. It really only affects the response from idle to something silly like 1/8 throttle opening after that, the difference in vacuum is negligible compared to the actual vacuum created at such a large throttle opening. Ensures smooth transition from idle to partial throttle opening. It is really important to do especially after you change the headers since the motor now breathes differently per cylinder than they did when stock.

4



You need a carb sync tool. A mercury stick works well, and can be bought from any well equipped motorcycle store. You need a flat screwdriver to adjust the carbs, as well as misc. spanners to remove the airbox etc.

Before you sync your carbs, you should make sure that your valves are within spec, and that the engine is in good condition (plugs ok etc).

1: Remove the seat, and the bolt in front of the tank. Lift the tank up as high as possible.

2: Remove the airbox, there are several screws holding the box together.

3: Under the carbs, there are 4 bolts which need to be removed. It is a pain to get to them, but take your time. I believe they are 10mm bolts.

4: Install the suitable brass tubes which should be a part of the carb sync kit instead of the 4 bolts. Connect the tubes from the carb sync tool to the brass tubes.

5: Start the engine, and run until it is warm. Let it idle at approx. 1100rpm, and compare the readings on the carb sync tool. If the needles/mercury height or whatever measurement the tool shows the vacuum, is the same for all cylinders, you are OK, otherwise, you will have to adjust the carbs.

6: To adjust the carbs, start with the leftmost pair. At the gas linkage between carb #1 and #2, there is a screw to adjust them with. Carefully screw in or out until the carb 1 and 2 is in sync. Very small adjustments are needed. When finished, crank the gas and let it idle, and check the sync again.

7: Repeat procedure 6 for the rightmost carbs, carb #3 and #4. Then, adjust the balance between carburetor #1/2 and #3/4. This is done with a screw between #2 and #3 carb. Turn the screw in or out until both pairs line up.

8: Crank the gas a few times, and re-check the readings. If they don't line up, repeat step 6 and 7.

The readings doesn't have to line up 100%, I don't remember how much difference is allowed, but I guess someone else can post the values, Santo perhaps? 



5
The bolts for the vacuum fittings are 6mm, not 10mm.

For the adjustment procedure, the number 3 carb is not independently adjustable, and is considered the base. First adjust the #4 carb to the #3 base carb, using the screw between them. Recheck tach, and adjust idle speed to 1000-1050rpms if required. Second, adjust the #1 carb to #2, using the screw between them. Again, check/adjust engine speed if necessary. Finally, adjust the #1/#2 set of carbs to the #3/#4 set, by using the screw between the #2 & #3 carbs.

You really should do the 1 & 2 carbs first, since doing them a little out of order can sometimes force you to make more corrective adjustments than necessary to get them all balanced.

6
K&L sells a nifty set of 6mm carb adaptors, they look to be steel in the catalog. They're a 2-pc design; the threaded, main shaft screws into the ports, and then a cap screws onto that. When the time rolls around for a carb synch, just unscrew the ends and you're good to go!

Ignition
1
"Spec" for the R1's ignition is published in the manual, as 55 degress advance @ 5000rpm. Since the advancing of the curve is controlled by the black box, you could actually find out if your stock trigger is 'off', by using a 'positive stop' to first locate true top dead center, then with a degree wheel mounted on the stator side of the crank, find 55 degrees before TDC, and then scribe a mark on the ignition pickup/case area. button everything back up, hook up a timing light, rev to 5000, and then look to see if the 55 marks you made are aligned.

2
RPM (Rohm Performance Machine) ignition trigger. You can get one from Graves, they are $79.95. Number is (818) - 902-1942.

3
One of my observations from playing with the advancer on my bike was 100% confirmed on this 2nd bike. As you increase the ignition advance, it leans out your fuel mixture. This bike was way rich to start with and we just watched that rich condition completely go away by the time the advancer was cranked up to 5 degrees. We put it back on 3 though as that gave the best results on this bike.

4
The spark plug cap screws onto the wire, and many times, the act of pulling the wire/boot/cap off of the plug, can strain this area. Once you have the cap off the plug, grasp the plug wire firmly, and thread the cap onto it, until it is tight. (Turn it clockwise, if you are looking at the plug end of the cap). If the cap is loose on the wire, it can definitely cause misfiring of the plug at low speeds.

5
Dynajet ignition boxes…
How does an ignition advancer work? The real problem here is that what we're talking about is not an advancer at all, it's the "trigger" that signals the crankshaft's position, so the black box sends the signal to the coils to fire the plugs. In older bikes, part of the trigger assembly included two spring loaded weights, that used centrifugal force to alter the relationship of the trigger position relative to the crankshaft, depending on RPM. The trigger is now rigidly mounted on the crankshaft snout, and the ignition advance curve is completely handled by the black box in modern bikes like the R1. What Rohm / Graves is offering is a trigger that is mounted on a plate with three Allen-head bolts that are sitting in slots. This gives you the ability to fine-tune the trigger's position in the slots, then tighten the bolts back down. When the bike is running, the signals will be shifted by a fixed amount determined by how much you moved the trigger on the plate.

6
http://www.dynaonline.com/

7
http://www.superchips.co.uk/bike/indexfr.htm
U.S. supplier: superchips inc. 134 baywood ave longwood,fl.32750 (407)260-0838 this should be the place:
http://www.superchips.com

8
The superchips unit is capable of being programmed with an ignition MAP (read: curve(s)) So for _example_ with it you will be able to obtain:
0 degrees from say 0-2,000 rpm
3 degrees advance 2,000-6,000
3.5 degrees advance from 6000-10,000
1 degree retard from 10,000-12,000
in gradations (a curve) (advance vs. rpm)
I have installed quite a few in cars and no, the differences are not as noticeable as reprogramming FI, but the gains are there nonetheless.

9
Reply: I'll bet even though they list a part number on their website for an R1, that they don't really have it available or have even taken into consideration that the R1 black box has DIFFERENT IGNITION MAPS/CURVES FOR EACH GEAR.

Air Intake, Airboxes
1
The Attack setup is the least restrictive of all the ram air setups currently being offered for the R1: SantoJ

2
I've been running a 3/8" aluminum shim under the screw that holds the front of the tank down. This lifts the tank and provides more area for the air-box to suck air. That area, in my opinion, is bigger than the area underneath the bike between the frame and the tank.

3
Greg's strategy of raising the fuel tank to let more air in is exactly what Kevin Curtain with the Australian #1 National Pro-superbike R1 has done. He lifted it by about 7-10mm approximately.

4
Johnny Rocket just raced an R1 with the attack box and their kit in a 2nd thru 6th roll-on on this past Sunday, in front of a few friends, the attack equipped bike had a Full Akra, 175 lb rider and dymag wheels, John's bike has only the full Akra, and my needles, and 132.5 main jets, John weighs about 240 with his gear on, John beat the attack equipped bike by at least 6 bike lengths by the end of 5th gear. The attack airbox's inlet when installed, is positioned above the radiator and does not protrude out at all. Wes, I will NEVER agree with you on this one... nor will I get into any heated argument either, anything else that I have tried to increase the power of the R1 (STOCK ENGINE, NO INTERNAL MODS) has resulted in a waste of time.
Ivan

Cams
1
My cams are degreed at 108/100 (which was the stock setting) and seems to be the best for my bike. I am surprised to see the 105/102 figures.

2
Standard R1 cam specs
Stock intake cam specifications: Stock exhaust cam specifications:
lift - 7.35MM  lift - 7.75MM
duration - 268 degrees duration - 276 degrees
intake cam opens at 32 degrees before TDC exhaust cam opens at 66 degrees before BDC
intake cam closes a 56 degrees after BDC exhaust cam closes at 30 degrees after TDC
lobe center - 102 degrees lobe center - 108 degrees

3
It appears to me that Yamaha's 5 valve engines seem to prefer cam timing in the 108 ~ 109 degree intake and 100 ~ 102 degree exhaust, because I attempted to improve the performance of my 1988 FZR1000 and had spoken to two different cam manufacturers and one other tuner. They recommended a 105 intake and a 104 exhaust. Before I removed my stock sprockets I checked my cam timing and found it to be 109 intake and 100 exhaust. The end result of moving the cams to 105 / 104 was to produce a bigger dip below 3,000 rpm, a 2 ~ 3 hp gain from 3,000 to 6,000 - equal power from 6,000 up to 9,500 - and the power ended abruptly there. I put the stock sprockets back in and got the power back to where it ends at 11,000 rpm just like before.

As far as finding the correct ignition advance without a degree wheel, it can be done by installing a dial indicator into the #1 or #4 cylinder, zeroing the indicator and using it to find top dead center. Scribe a mark on the engine cases and one on the ignition rotor. Then, using an adjustable timing light,set the adjustment to 55 degrees and run the engine at 5,000 RPM. If your marks line up then you're set to factory specification. Make sure you wear an apron and goggles because oil may come out of the open crankcase.
Ivan

4
See section on Ignition for reference:
I really don't want to get into an argument with you over this, but the method you describe for finding top dead center is not really that accurate. While a dial indicator down the plug hole will tell you when the piston has reached the top of the bore, it will not tell you when you've reached top dead center. When the piston reaches the top of the bore, it will stay there (on the R1) for almost 1.5 degrees or crankshaft rotation, before it begins to descend back down the bore as you continue to rotate the crankshaft. How long the piston stays at the top of its travel is a function of connecting rod length for the given stroke. The longer the connecting rod used for a given stroke, the longer the piston will sit there. This is exploited heavily by tuners building turbocharged indycar engines. They use connecting rods that are as longs as possible, so much so that some move the wrist pin into the ring-lands area, necessitating the use of wristpin buttons that have ring grooves cut in them. All so that the piston can stay parked at top dead center while the cylinder pressure builds to the moon. This can be seen with the dial indicator. Slowly bring the piston up to the top, and you will be able to continue to rotate the crank with nothing at all happening to the dial indicator, and then it will finally start to move again as the piston starts to move down the bore. As Greg Crowe's dyno testing of the adjustable trigger shows, a difference of only two degrees can have a noticeable effect on power. In my opinion, introducing a 1.5 degree variable into something like this is counter productive to what you are trying too accomplish in the first place. A degree wheel only costs $15 and is far more accurate. Finally the terms "top dead center" and "bottom dead center" are actually references to the point that is centered exactly half way between the two points of crankshaft rotation, during which the piston stays stationary at the top or bottom of the bore. Hence the terms "top dead center" and "bottom dead center."

5
I agree, Santo. It was just another method - less complicated but less accurate. I enjoy using my precision tools, as you do, but not everybody has them.
Ivan

6
I have been back to the dyno today. I increased my compression ratio to 14.5 : 1 with no ill effect and I have no detonation whatsoever on pump gas. I have set the cams to 106 / 107 and have been able to get 170.6 rear wheel horse power and 104.5 nm from 8,500 to 11,000. The3 bike absolutely rips.

The cam timing is still not right however and I will be moving them around tomorrow to see what happens - 110 on the inlet at least. I believe there's still another 5 bhp in the equation. It puffs fuel at the moment, but seems to enjoy that over a leaner setting. (Strange, but I think it is the timing and compression at this altitude - 6,200 feet.
 

Tuners/Engine Builders
1
Ivan: 914-362-1212, in Pomona NY.
155hp, mostly with airbox mods and lots of fine tuning.
1630 Route 202, Pomona, NY 10970
Rockland County Motorcycle Service
Located 35 miles northwest of NYC

2
Mike at Laser Porting at 610 323-0296
for head and porting work

3
Attack Performance http://www.attack-perf.com

4
To do the head and degree the cams was $2,000 CD or around $1,350 US. That is not bad considering they got 157.3HP out of the bike with a slip on on the bike. They said ship them the entire motor and they would ship back ready to go straight back in the bike. The only down fall is they have about a 3-4 week turn around time. "The bike carburates great from idle up with no hesitations or flat spots anywhere."
e-mail address: gobak@home.com
Richard Bak at BRC, Calgary, Ontario

5
http://racing.dynojet.com/rpm/

6
gobak@home.com   Internet address of a serious bike modifier, performance, painting, everything
157-160HP (with just a slip-on vs using a full system) from decking the head, cleaning up the ports (with out any reshaping), 5 angle valve job and played with the cam timing. Around $1,300 US. Turn around would be around three weeks.

7
Jerry Cooper at Cooper performance in Ga, used to work at Star racing, about $1,000 to $1,200 to do the head and said he would expect a 10% gain in hp.
(912)-922-7600

8
http://www.factorypro/ProdPages/Prody68.html
Factory Pro

9
http://www.tts-performance.co.uk

10
JAPAN RACE IMPORTS - 801-698-8031
Factory race kit for the R1 - Probably RcSugo stuff

Turbos, Nitrous, Big Bore Kits
1
Turbo system for R1
http://www.americanturbo.com $5,995.00

2
Both JE as well as Wiseco, offer standard bore, and 2mm oversize piston kits for the R1. The R1's cylinder bore is electroplated with a ceramic composite in a process that is somewhat similar to the Mahle corporation's Nikasil electroplating process, but is more durable. There are currently only four shops on the North American continent that can replate the R1's cylinders with the Nikasil process. Both Attack Performance, as well as Orient Express have installed these kits. Figure on spending in the vicinity of $1,200.00 for the pistons & replating, with you supplying a disassembled upper cylinder case, with the cylinder studs removed.
Santo Jannotti

Hardware, Coatings
1
Rohm adjustable ignition trigger. Dyno R1 with current pipe and jets plus Rohm.
3120 Industrial Drive
Yuba City, CA (530) 674-9123

2
41mm Keihin FCR's w/tps is $1,015.00 (supposedly dealer cost). Call Carb Warehouse, you can get them for around $1,000-1,100.
You do not need the adapter plates if you aren't using the airbox and just run velocity stacks. We tried the set up both ways and found the set works much better if you don't us the airbox and just run velocity stacks.

3
http://www.crracing.com/ Custom radiators

4
http://www.swaintech.com Thermal barrier coating

5
http://www.hpcoatings.com Header coatings

6
LO-KO Coatings, and ask for Johnny!!! Phone # is 708-424-7863. Tell him that you were recommended to him by Tim from Aquatrends. Another coating company

Dyno Runs, Results, Use, Tuner Tips, Math, Big Bore Kits
1
Some dyno basics. If your 4th gear pull is making more hp than your all-gear pull, you're probably too lean. If your 4th gear pull is 4-5 hp lower than your all-gear pull (which is what we saw in the beginning on this 2nd R1), then you are probably too rich. When too rich, you will see a funny looking all-gear run where the hp seems to jump quite a bit from 3rd gear on up. Also, you'll see the hp peak at the beginning of 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th and then immediately fall off. When your 4th-6th gears in the all-gear run has a perfectly flat line at the top of each gear, you're pretty close. Those are just generalizations. They help me figure out which way to go with jetting. I always keep going until I see the hp level off or drop from successively high main jets. A lot of times you'll find 2 main jets that perform almost identical. In that case, always go with the leaner jet. When you're out on the streets in 95 degree weather with your engine at 220 degrees, you'll be glad you went with the leaner jetting.

Also, from my experience, 1 size too rich on main jets hurts the max hp by about 3hp. 1 size too lean only hurts max hp by 1 hp.

2
hp=torque*rpm/5252
That's why all power and torque curves cross at 5252rpm.

3
I have just got off the phone with Chris Bladan who is the creator of the 169 hp R1 in the August issue of SuperBike. He is amazingly open and frank in his comments and the information regarding his bike and some other Yamahas that they have done. He tells me that they have just done a tear-down on the R1 engine - no problems, and they were able to extract another 6 hp. (175 rwhp.)

Contrary to the information that we have received, Wes, he has given me 106 / 107 [I / E] as a good bet. They used Over cams, and by all accounts the cams are very similar to mine in all respects.

There is a kicker though. They're R1 runs a compression ratio of 14.5 : 1 on good old super unleaded pump gas!! He tells me that they run their 600s at 15.5 : 1 and even they run on pump gas. He said they tried running it on afgas [AVGAS ? ] but says that the burn is not right (something about being too slow) so they still use good race fuel or pump gas. He says the old WSB YZFs ran 0.034 squish at 14.5 : 1 and they can still run on pump gas. He says that the real issue is to be sure that the squish is not more than 0.034 inch and that the pistons have no hot spots (sharp edges) and it will not detonate. This is all made possible by the very efficient burn capabilities of all modern motorcycle engines.

I personally think that one needs to take all of the information that one has gained and try too find the best cam settings for one's own bike. Number 2 - heads are ported equally, compression ratios, squish, and everything else varies from bike to bike. I will do my small increment adjustments until I find a suitable setup for mine. I will post the results. I do not feel however that these will be the best for everyone.

4
If all you want is 155 at the rear, remove the cylinder head and send it to a quality shop, such as Attack Performance. They will port and polish it, do a full radius valve job, and mill the head slightly for a 13 : 1 compression ratio, which you can still use pump gas with. An M4 exhaust is less expensive than an Akra and will give you comparable gains. With your stock carbs properly jetted and these two mods, you will be in the vacinity of 160 ~ 165 rear wheel hp.

5
Attack will charge somewhere between $1,300 and $1,500 to do the head. There are no downsides whatsoever to doing this (other than the initial price) and you're not going to get some kind of radical drag-race setup. The ports will be cleaned up and mildly reshaped, resulting in a 10 ~ 14% improvement in flow. Taking 20 ~ 30 thousanths off the deck surface will give you an excellent boost in midrange performance, as this is where the raised compression makes the most improvement. The full radius valve job will allow for higher flow and increased turbulence for improved combustion efficiency.

6
If you add the Attack airbox, along with a set of higher lift cams, you will be in the vacinity of 170 ~ 175 rwhp, and the FCR flatslides will add another 3 to 5 on top of that.

I would not recommend that you change the wheels, unless you really want to. Anything lighter is going to be made out of magnesium, and cost upward of $1,800.oo along with being brittle. Carbon Fiber wheels are over $4,000.oo so they're pretty much out of the question for the average street bike.

I would seriously consider getting the front forks revalved, along with a quality rear shoch, such as the ones offered by Fox, Ohlims or Penske.

By the way - before you do any of the above, get yourself a good steering damper. The stock bike is a handful as it is with the headshake situation, and boosting the performance will only make it happen more often.

7
The best gas for your engine is the gas with the LOWEST OCTANE that does not result in detonation/pinging. The higher the octane, the slower the fuel burns.
Greg Crowe.

Faster burn usually means more hp. I run 89 octane in my R1.

END OF SECTION - Mike

EXUP

1
Ok, here's the dirt, with or without the resistor it feels the same, maybe a VERY small amount better at part throttle with the resistor, under 6000rpm, in my opinion, if you want to get rid of the servo, the resistor is the way to go..., I did not try to play with the T.P.S yet, (pain in the ass to get at without lifting carbs). I think that you must use this size resistor, If you don't you may not get the proper timing map. I did not get the 7000rpm warning when turning the key.
Ivan

2
Ivan, you are so cool, that I think you deserve to live in California!
I just found (stole) a 7.5 ohm 1 watt resistor. I was worried about how I was going to attach it without hurting the wiring harness. But now I have the confidence to just cut the wires on the servo (fishing weight) side, and solder and shrink wrap the sucker permanent like.
I'm officially putting this string to rest, unless someone can without a doubt, prove otherwise to Ivan's opinion. Be aware, if you try and are wrong, you will go down in flames "BIG TIME"!!!
This new string will be called "The Ivan Seat of Pants Servo Challenge!"
I will buy dinner for the challenger if they can prove "without a doubt" that the servo is better!

3
If you don't want to cut your harness, call me, so I can tell you what parts to get, or better yet, I can make something for you. Ivan

4
Whoah there boy! AugiDawg, wasn't that resistor supposed to be a 7.5 K ohm! Note the K...

There is a thousand times difference in value between 7.5ohm and 7.5Kohm. Big difference.

Now some problems, resistors don't come in 7.5kohm. The closest you would get is a 6.8kohm, or a 8.2kohm. Best bet is join two in series (a line) to add them together, and you could use a 4.7kohm + 2.7kohm, giving about 7.4kohm. Should be close enough.

Here are the color codes;
4.7kohm = yellow,purple,red,gold
2.7kohm = red,purple,red,gold

Resistors are only a few cents, so I recommend getting the best ones; you can go for "2 watt metal film" will cost 20c each instead of 5c each. Sorry to be such a nerd guys.

5
I just got off the phone with Ivan. He looked at the book and confirmed that it is 7.5K ohm. That is what he used for his tests. The part # from radio shack is 90-556. It is a metal film 1/2 watt 1% accuracy resistor.
If you read the whole string, you might get confused like I did. I did run the bike yesterday with the 7.5 ohm resistor. It seemed to run fine with no diagnostic code on the tach. But Ivan said, that 7.5 ohms is very close to just the jumper wire value of zero ohms, and the ignition mapping may not be at full advance. So I guess that just a little resistance keeps the computer from seeing a fault.

6
To actually bypass the CDI EXUP programming, do the following.....
There is a 4 wire connector, and a single white loose wire coming from the EXUP servo motor, and they both plug into the wiring harness. Disconnect both, and take the white wire off the wiring harness, and connect it to the red striped black wire, which is part of the 4 wire connector, again on the wiring harness side. Remove the EXUP servo motor, and you are done. I asked if this was dyno tested, and the response was that it was, with no loss of power in any gear, in both the mid-range, as well as at high rpm. In operation, the bike will display the diagnostic one time at initial startup, and then function normally. The racing wiring harness for the R1 that is being offered by R C Sugo, has this modification already done. (Harness cost is $495.00....stock is $100).

7

1-1999 YZF-R1 with full yosh duplex stainless steel 4-2-1 pipe
2-stock carbs with 138 main jets,3.5 turn out on the mixture screws,stock yamaha needles shimed
3-dynojet springs with one throttle slide hole plugged on each slides
4-QBCARBON ramair system with homemade nose extension(to be further developped with 3 air intakes thanks to QBCARBON side panels), new oil,plugs,oil filter,cleaned air filter,new clutch fiber plates,shagged chain.

dyno;temp was at 22c,and base runs were done 20 minutes or less before the final runs(after servo-motor ditching). We did 3 w/servo 4th gear runs with an all gear run(3rd,4th,5th)immediately after. same thing for the w/o servo-motor runs.

carbs problems;it appears that i need to un-plug the throttle slide holes,go back with the dynojet needles,and maybe run the carbs with 2 springs in each carbs(the stock one+dynojet)to cure the 4-5000rpm stumble...but that`s not what we are looking for here.

dynorun#1:torque run--->>before servo-motor ditching:73.7 ft/pnd
after servo-motor ditching:75.2 ft/pnd
dynorun#2:4th gear roll-on+all gear(3rd,4th,5th)with servo-motor
dynorun#3:4th gear roll-on+all gear(3rd,4th,5th)w/o servo motor
dynorun#4:4th gear roll-on with and without servo-motor

results: these are the results done here,on my bike;it may not be possible to replicate that kind of results with your bikes.

4th gear roll-on:3.8hp gain(136.5-->140.3)
torque:1.5 ft/pnd of gain(73.7--->75.2)
all gears(3rd,4th,5th)2hp gain(140.4-->142.4)

how to do it:
unplug the servo motor (1 4wires plug+1 loose plug)and throw it as far as possible;
the loose wire is white with a red stripe;you cant miss it.
jump it with the black with the red stripe from the plastic plug...thats it!

note:
check the consistency between the 4thgear+all gear curves without servo with the one with the servo;you`ll be able to see that they are the same

8
Borg, thanks for the test results. A lot of us have been wondering what is really going on with that exup servo motor.

Despite all the whoopla I'm reading, I still see very real differences on these dyno charts that are consistent across the board on each chart. There appears to be a loss of hp/torque below 6K and a gain above 6K(on the 4th gear run). To me that would prove out the theory of different ignition curves in each gear. You are now probably stuck with one/the same ignition curve in all 6 gears. The 4th gear hp and torque charts show this clearly.

What would REALLY be interesting would be to do the exact same back to back one-gear tests in 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th. The upper gears don't need as "hot" of a timing curve as the lower gears.

Borg, what I'd really like to see if you have it is a chart of the all-gear runs together, both with and without the servo motor. I'd like to see if some gears improved on peak hp and others lost????

9
I don't think any of this has to do with what gear the bike is in- it has to do with the ignitor changing the timing depending on what position the servo is in.

With the help of a manual, a multimeter, and some thought, I've determined the "jumper" makes the ignitor think the EXUP is stuck shut. Not open. The white/red wire is the variable resistance wire- it's the wire that tells the ignitor where the EXUP is at. The white/black (+) and yellow/blue (-) are also part of the "position signaling" portion of the exup. You'll note the TPS is exactly the same- it even shares leads off the + and - wires and has it's own variable resistance wire. The black/red (+) and black/yellow (-) are for the motor. So, connecting the black/red and white/red wires without any resistor will make the ignitor think it's stuck shut.

If I were to guess, I'd say this retards the timing resulting in less midrange and more on top. So, for anyone going to the dyno soon, you might want to try something different. Either connect the 3 wires mentioned above but not the motor and try some dyno runs while turning the servo's output piece each time noting its position. Then pick the best run and set the servo to that position, measure its resistance, buy a resistor put it between the 2 jumper wires and you're set.

Or, buy a few resistors (I think the manual said 0-7.5) so, buy a 2.5, 5, and 7.5 and do dyno runs with each. Then choose the best one. Both of these are just ways of determining the ideal ignition setting by fooling the ignitor into thinking the exup is in different positions.

To Ivan or anyone going to the dyno, since my bike is in pieces, I can't do any testing myself, but I really want to know what's up with this. So, if any of you are willing to humor me I'd be glad to pay for 5 dyno runs with your bike as long as you have a multimeter to measure the resistance of the exup in different positions.

10
Just to clarify, I'm only will to pay for the dyno runs if someone responds 1st and agrees to do it- so that way 50 people don't do it and expect me to pay. Ivan? Also the 5 runs need to be done like I want- then I (and we) will be sure about all this, which is the point of me paying in the 1st place.

Also, in case you were wondering I determined the jumper thing makes the ignitor think the EXUP is stuck SHUT, not open, by noting the starting position of the exup servo. The servo rotates clockwise pulling the #2 cable. If you look in the exup opening you'll see this pulls it open. I would have thought any "jumper mod" would make the ignitor think the exup is fully open. Then (per the manual) I measured the variable resistance of the servo which should be between 0 and 7.5 ohms. In the starting position it was 0 (or very little depending on its position) and its resistance went up as I turned it clockwise- which will open the exup.

Anyway, to further clarify how I think the dyno runs should be done, it's like this. Do one with the jumper- this is the same as stuck shut (0 ohms). Do one with the exup plugged in per normal- this should be optimal, I would hope ((varying resistance) 0-7.5 ohms per the manual). Then use a multimeter to determine the position of the servo output where it reads 2.5, 5, and 7.5 ohms- you could draw little marks on the servo the signify the position. If anyone is confused by this part- I'll do this to mine and send it to you. Then simply do 3 more dyno runs after hooking up the yellow/blue, white/red, and the white/black wires, but not the other 2. You'll need 3 short pieces of wire to do this. The motor will not operate, but the positioning signal part will. The 3 runs will be after setting the exup output to the 3 previously determined positions. Doing this (in mentioned order) will simulate the exup being stuck shut, as normal, stuck 1/3 open, stuck 2/3 open, and stuck open.

Alternatively, (in the same order) do one with the jumper, one with the exup, and 3 more with a 2.5, 5, and 7.5 ohm resistors instead of a jumper wire. This may be the easier route since one of the resistors may be the best and that will be the prefered mod, not just a jumper wire.

Anyway, I hope this clarifies what I was trying to say, so, Ivan or whoever, please respond so we're clear and tell me how much it will cost. Geez, I hope I'm correct on all this. In the end, I don't need to know what the ignitor thinks, just what resistance the white/red wire sees (aka what position the exup would be in if it were there) to get the best ignition curve.

08R

If any of this is unclear, let me know.

11
Let's look at some of the possibilities. I imagine the ignition timing is calculated by reference to a three dimensional map, burned into an E-PROM. It would include RPM on one axis and throttle position in another, and the result would be read off the third. In addition, there'd be small correction factors added for things like ambient temp, coolant temp and so forth. In this case we have a separate map for each gear. We know how the gear selection is established, that's no mystery. We know that there is a signal returned from the exup motor, and now we know that zero ohms means fully shut and 7.5 ohms means open. So far so good.
Does the ignition timing map also have hold values for the exup? Is there like a second 'layer' to the map(s) that describes the action of the exup with relation to throttle and RPM? In that case, does the return signal merely confirm that the exup is doing what it should?
Is the exup controlled by some separate mechanism or circuitry, and the value returned from the exup position sensor used to apply some predetermined correction factor to the already calculated ignition timing figures, as in the case of the ambient temperature sensor and coolant temperature sensor?
These seem to me like the two most likely possibilities, but they are by no means the only possibilities. Perhaps the maps are '4 dimensional' rather than three. In that case the ignition timing gets read off as a function of RPM : throttle : exup - position & (by virtue of the multiple maps) gear selection. Or possibly there's a little processor that gets these inputs and calculates timing based a programmed algorithm, rather than reading it off a map at all. Who knows? As I said the other day, Yamaha have been singularly unhelpful in explaining how it works.
Mike

12
Ok. I did the tests today, one is with the stock servo and the jumper wire, one is with a 7.5k ohm resistor as a jumper, the wire (no resistance loses power slightly, while the resistor duplicates the stock servo, in my opinion no power gains at full throttle, I will drive it tomorrow and see what seat of the pants feels like. Maybe it will be a little better at part throttle. Its an easy thing to test. Heres the graphs. Humidity was 80% today. Ivan

13
Ok guys, run #8 is the stock servo, its on both graphs, run #4 is with the jumper WIRE, run #6 is with the 7.5k ohm resistor installed. run # 6 is virtually identical to #8, so I am assuming that is how to get rid of the servo, I still want to ride it tomorrow to see if it still responds the same or maybe better. Ivan

14
Hi Speedy, the resistor that I used is a 7.5k ohm resistor, you can buy them at Radio Shack, they cost less than $2.00ea, I will check the wattage and tell you tomorrow. With the jumper , the bike made about 1.5hp less at peak, and slightly less in the mid-range than with the servo installed, if you want to duplicate the resistance as with the servo installed then you have to use the resistor. With the jumper wire, it is the same as if the EXUP valve was closed, with the resistor, its the same as if the EXUP valve was opened. I personally won't get rid of the servo unless the driveability is improved without it. I think I will try messing with the throttle sensor if there is no improvement from the resistor, it worked on the 9R, maybe it will work on the R1. I'll keep everyone informed. Ivan

15
The resistor that I used was 1/2watt, 7.5k ohm, with an accuracy of 1%, for everyones info. glad to be of help.

16
Well this confirms that you don't loose anything at full throttle, so the next scientific test would be back to back runs at 3/4 , 1/2, 1/3, and 1/4 throttle. But that wouldn't demonstrate response to changes in throttle setting. I think the only reasonable way to do this is to get Ivan to ride the bike for a while and see if he can detect any change from stock by the seat of his pants. I'd tend to trust the seat of Ivan's pants more than most dynos anyway. It's up to you Ivan - let us know what you think.
My opinion would be that if Ivan can't notice any real difference, we can all (all the full system people) safely remove the servo and wire up a 7.5 ohm resister and forget about it. I'd regard that as a very satisfactory conclusion to the whole question.
Mike

17
Hey everyone,
it seems like Ivan has settled this for the most part. Not a lot of difference with or without a resistor- although it's slightly better with one. Not close to the difference Speedborg got with the jumper though.

I think I may have figured out a way to stop the 7,000rpm tach thing too, I'll post the results soon. I used the jumper method as soon a I got my Akrapovic and felt the drivability was suprisingly good. So, personally, I'm going with the resistor even if I can't fix the tach. Augi
 
 

orts all offer adjustable triple clamps for the R1.

7
The Ohlins new road and track front fork gives enthusiastic road riders and top local racers championship winning performance at a "look twice" price.

Already standard equipment on the Yamaha R7 and Aprilia RSV Mille SP, the new Ohlins R & T fork is now available for the R1 and the Ducati Hyper Sport 748, 916, 996. The fork will be delivered as a bolt-on kit and fits straight onto the bikes. The new fork is based on technology straight from Ohlins championship winning superbike fork. It features the same upside-down design. The inner steel legs have a 43mm diameter and a polished titanium nitride surface for lowest friction. Damping is handle [sic] by Ohlins uniques cartridge damping system, and both rebound and compression damping, and spring preload, are externally adjustable. The surface features Ohlins "Golden Touch" that breathes both performance and precision.

Production of these forks is due July 1999.

8
Lindeman: $680 for .95 springs and titanium nitrite ($350 + tax alone), modified valving, 5 weight oil. Smoother ride, plush, no snap when front end comes down. Racetech achieves same thing by replacing innards with Gold Valve, more expensive.

9
http://www.kyleusa.com
Nice pre-load adjusters; talk to dan, he seems like a good guy.

10
Ohlins "Race & road" forks. They are basically the same as the forks on the R7, Mille Sp etc. More info at http://www.ohlins.nl goto the NEW section.

Having said that, they really are amazing in their performance. The damping is really superb, even when comparing to my old Race-Tech modified forks, which were no slugs.
Joerund Seim

11
Attack Performance triple clamps: Top shelf stuff for sure. Keep in mind that with adjustable triple clamps, you will lose the ability to use the steering lock function. If you can live with that, the clamps are great. This is not unique to the Attack pieces, it's just that when the triple clamp is moved forward in relation to the steering head, the bar that comes out of the ignition tumbler will no longer reach the frame stop. The Attack clamps come with three sets of eccentrics (0, 2, 4 mm), that can be reversed, for a total of 5 different positions. Eccentrics are available in 1 mm increments from 0 - 6, and if you decide that you want to try a different set, you can exchange for a different size for free, or purchase additional ones for $50.00 a size.
Santo Jannotti

12
I should have said mm, NOT degrees. Sorry for any confusion. The eccentrics are reversible, and the effect is to move the forks either forward or backward in relationship to the steering stem, but without changing the angle of the forks. The eccentrics are paired, in that you need to change the top & bottom at the same time. Attack cautions that you are NOT to do anything like put a 4mm on the top, and a 2mm on the bottom, as the holes for the eccentrics are perpendicular to the plane of the triple clamps, and to to do would result in an unsafe, binding condition. Starret? Nah, Brown & Sharp is the best, with Mitutoyo running a close second.
Santo Jannotti

13
The Attack clamps come supplied without a provision for the ignition cylinder. They offer a nice bracket for this purpose as a $25.00 option, and will drill 2 6mm holes and mount it for you. When I ordered mine, I also asked that they tap holes to mount the master cylinder reservoir, as well as a provision for brake line keepers.
Santo Jannotti

14
To fit a set of those (WSB Ohlins forks) properly on your bike, you will be shelling out almost enough to buy another R1. If you like the look, but can't handle the load, Ohlins has a much more reasonable set, which is called the "Road & Track" forks. They are identical to the ones that come on the R7, and will directly replace the forks you now have, with no other changes or parts necessary. They have a suggested retail of $2,495.00. The WSB forks in my pic, retail for over $7,000.00.
Santo Jannotti

15
I just reinstalled my forks last night, after they were modified by Phil Douglas of Aftershocks. He is located in Palo Alto, CA. I had him installed heavier Race Tech .95 springs, and both rebound and compression Gold Valves (he used his own valving rates though). I also had a new pair of fresh fork seals installed while the forks were apart. Let me tell you, the man is GOOD! Even just on the way to work this morning, I could *instantly* tell what an improvement his mods made. The bike dives much less on the brakes, and the bike floats over the poor excuse we have for streets here in the city. The revalved rebound circuits prevent the front end from popping back up so quickly after hard braking, too; the compression and rebound adjusters actually work! The total charge came to $190 (it would normally be $150, but additional machining R1 forks require added $40 to the total bill); still, a 3-day turnaround, plus Phil being a very approachable guy, makes for repeat business in my book! I highly recommend this alternative to Lindemann or Race Tech. Aftershocks can be reached @: (650)-494-8849, or e-mail Phil @:D318s@aol.com
Jeff

16
The above fork work was completed using 5W "Rock Oil"

17
>Jeff, what was the extra machining for? And was the
>price inclusive of parts, or did you supply the parts?

I supplied the parts. My forks required machining because of Race Tech's rebound Gold Valve kit; the inner rod must be cut and modified so that the pin and spring that is part of the kit sit within the central rebound tube. Now, Phil can also modify the *stock* rebound valve, but he states that it's a pain in the ass, as the stock valve body is peened onto the main shaft and not designed to be removable or tunable. It must be ground of, and the shaft threaded for a retaining nut. He can modify the rebound circuits either way, but recommends that the customer go the rebound Gold Valve route (you can either supply the parts, or he can order them through his shop), due to the simple fact that a)it's a bit less time-consuming for him to install, and b)since it's "tuneable" via changing the shim stacks, you can bring the forks to a higher level of performance. I just got off the phone with him, and he says that if y'all have any questions, feel free to e-mail him at D318s@aol.com
.
Jeff
PS: I just learned that he also de-slopped my slider bushings on the inner tube. Nice touch!

18
On 10/22/99 6:27:11 PM, jparis wrote:
>I know the .95 springs only ran me about
>$78; Gold Valves I got for roughly just
>under $100 a set.

I guess the "up side" of Lindemann's fork job is that it goes for $295, springs, parts, labor, oil and seals included. No more costs.

19
http://www.race-tech.com/
Race Tech

20
A cool tip for setting fork tube height. Use a Pit Bull front stand, pull the wheel and clamp one tube at the desired height. Then instead of measuring the second tube, adjust it to you can finger thread the axle without any resistance. The tubes might not measure exactly the same at the top triple clamp (mine don't, about 1mm off), but the actual length will be dead nuts.

Shocks, Linkage, Swingarm

1
Lowering linkage
http://www3.sympatico.ca/a.jones

2
American Turbo will offer a 6 inch longer than stock swingarm for the R; box bracing like the stock setup, mfg by a former Harris Performance employee. Retail cost to be around $900.00, with availability starting sometime in May, '99.
http://www.americanturbo.com

3
http://www.ram.mc
Brakes, wheels, swingarms, etc.

4
Three series of Penske shocks for R1. All three have the same preload adj. the same ride hieght adj. the rebound adjs.(25-30 clicks) the difference is in the compression damping. The 8981 series has 6 compression adjs controlled by a rotating drum ($725.00). The 8986 series has 20-22 adjs. controlled by a shim stack simular to the one used on our main piston.($895.00). The 8987 series has independent high and low speed adjs($1125.00) - any questions call 610-375-6180.
These prices are in Canadian $, I believe

5
The last 2 or 3 numbers on an Ohlins shock are the spring rate.

6
http://www.ohlins.nl     Ohlins site

7
YA 801 Ohlins rear shock for the R1 with the hydraulic preload for $714 US + $25 US shipping.
Wim.Kroon.Import@inter.NL.net
credit cards accepted. ;the YA801 is the application 46PRCLS, which is fully adjustable shock, ride-height included! The reservoir is piggy-back, but horizontaly-mounted; the same shock,but with the reservoir mounted vertically (like ours) would be the 46PRCS. Both have remote hydraulic preload. Price ranges from US$750-900 depending on dealer/retail pricing.

8
The swingarm on the Crafar bike is made by:
Mont D'Or Techniques,
Saint Maurice -
Arc #1 04100 Manosque,
France/Monaco.
Tel: 04.92.72.34.44

9
R1 with a VFR single side. The work was done in Calgary, AB, Canada at BRC Engineering/Racing (403) 216-0630, talk to either Richard Bak or Riley Will.

10
I think the note below has to do with Ohlins rear shocks. Someone tell me if it doesn't

11
Earlier models came standard with a 9.0 spring. This has been changed recently to 8.5. Spring choices are available from 7.0 up to 10.0, in 0.5 increments. Tell them what you want when you order.

12
For the R1: I weigh about the same as you, I use the 8.5kg spring at the rear, and .95 springs in the forks. It is stiff, but not uncomfortable. It doesn't jump over bumps, I actually find these spring rates perfect. Try them out, you will probably love them.

13
DeWayne Jones will modify the stock R1 shock shim stack and lengthen the shock by 5mm for $ 175.00! This is an absolute steal at that price as the shock can be tailored to your exact requirements as well. His phone number is 909 626 2751 and he works out of his home. He assists some of the fastest riders on both sides of the border.

14
http://www.harrisperformance.co.uk
Harris Performance has two different single-sided swingarms for the R1

15
http://www.ppsracing.com/pr01.htm
PPS Suspension
info@ppsracing.com

Tel: 714-630-4PPS (4777)
FAX: 714-630-4788

16
Superbike magazine R1 front suspension set-up:

17 [There is no rule #17]

Sprockets, Chains, Cush Drives

1
Hub/sprocket carrier: Part # (#4xv-25366-00-00) is $62.22

2
Billet aluminum rear hub: JT Motorsports 800-276-8247
(1-800-crotch-rocket)

3
The old (bad) sprocket carrier is part #4XV253600 whereas the replacement (good) is 4XV25360 R1. Also if you take yours out the bad ones have TUSHIMA YES stamped on them but the replacement ones don't

4
White Lightning Chain Lube. I clean my chain with WD-40 really good, as previously mentioned, then I go ride the bike until it is physically warm to the touch (not just around the block). Then I spray a thick coating of chainwax on it and let it dry for a half hour. For me, this lasts between oil changes (3-4k miles). My last chain had 21k miles on it when I traded in the bike and no signs of needing a new one.

5
Pro-Tek Sprockets, Inc.
5138-R West Hurley Pond Road
Farmingdale, New Jersey USA 07727
Tel. 732.938.6444
E-mail protek@protekk.com

Fax 732.938.6510

6
1998 R1 owners: Look VERY VERY CLOSLEY at your cush drive and you may see the cracks develop before it fails. Use a magnifying glass if you have to.

7
The only problem with the cush drive, is that Yamaha in their quest for saving weight, made the drive dogs hollow, instead of solid. The JT motorsports cush drive has solid dogs.

8
The JT cush drive is not non-flexible, you still use the stock rubber pieces with it. Just the drive dogs are solid instead of hollow. The operation is the same as the stock piece. 4XV-25366-00-00 - The original 98 cush drive Yamaha part number 4XV-25360-R1-00 Is the replacement "kit" that has the updated cush drive, studs, nuts, and rear wheel bearing already installed. 4XV-25366-10-00 - The new updated or '99 cush drive itself without the other stuff. There is only 1 difference between the original '98 cush drive and the updated version. There are 6 "ears" that stick out of the cush drive hub itself that go between the rubber pieces in the rear wheel. Those "ears" are completely hollow on the original version. The updated version has about 1/2 the ears volume filled in with metal.

7
Performance Machines makes a cush drive for their spun wheels to save your tranmission and sprocket bolts. $295
http://www.performance-machine.com

8
I installed an aftermarket chain adjustment bloack from Intuitive Racing last night. The company claims that their block prevents axle creep when peforming that final tightening of the axle nut. For a long time I guess I was living in denial, because I sure didn't notice it. But when I checked and adjusted my chain last week, sure enough, the damned thing refused to stay where I put it after I torqued up the nut. I was lucky to spot the adjuster in the local shop ($24.95). A comparison between the stock adjuster and the aftermarket offerings reveals that the Intuitive piece has a slight radius on the inner side of the axle opening. This pretty much matches the radius that can be seen on the rear axle, just where the thread ends and tyhe solid shaft begins. The stock adjuster has no such radius.

The true proof of the pudding occurred when I went to tighten the nut. Before and after measurements of the axle revealed no slippage, compared to the stock setup. The only thing that puzzles me is the large clip that was included in the kit. Where the hell does that thing go? I guess the nut has to be drilled for it.

9
They now offer a gold chain from EK with over 10K tensile strength

10
Phone number to call the National Highway Transportation Safety Agency I case of rear hub failure: 888-DASH-2-DOT
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/oscripts/IVOQ/VOQ/voq1.cfm
http://www.nhsta.dot.gov

Shimmy Dampers

1
Black Widow
Black Widow Racing
619-547-9343
San Diego
http://www.bwracing.com
email bwracing@inetworld.net

Ask for Joe.

1a
I used a round thin file to make the mounting holes into slits (to bring the mount further away from the tack). Then I had to file the Ohlins mount so it didn't hit the ignition switch. The slits brought the 97mm measurement (as indicated in the BW instructions) to 95mm. Very happy with it now.

1b
I have just installed a BW with Ohlins and I did two things that weren't in the instructions. I mounted the bracket at 95mm instead of 97mm (this requires that you trim the Ohlins bracket so it doesn't hit the ignition switch). I also put some clear hose under the screw that mounts the main swivel (this stops the damper from clattering when you hit a bump or come down off a wheelie). Everything now fits great (full end to end movement!) I use setting 8 (out of 16 on the Ohlins).

2
Toby
R1 Toby shimmy damper kit (part number 4707020). "I like the Toby damper because of the way it mounts out of the way under the gauges."

3
Hyper Pro
http://www.hyperpro.com/steering2.html

4
Scott's
1a
The Scott's unit offers independant adjustment of both low, as well as high speed operation. No other steering damper offers this kind of flexability. This allows you to do things like set the high speed setting fairly stiff to control headshake, while not having to arm-wrestle your bike at parking lot/city speeds. I consider something like this to be a significant advantage over conventional steering dampers, since you do not have to keep readjusting the damper all the time.
Santo Jannotti
1b
The dampers are assembled with extremely high quality hydraulic oil, se240 for you tech buffs. You can use any good suspension fluid or if in a pinch a standard thin 2.5w or 3w fork oil will work. The advantage to using good oils is stability under temperature and load. We recommend in our manual for the self-servicing consumer, Bel Ray HVI 3w or Spectro Ultra-light suspension fluid. The damper will take almost anything but the different viscosities will affect your control settings just as your shock or forks would. Again, most road bikes will probably never need servicing under normal use. The Factory R6's have not been serviced yet after a season of racing so far.
Scott

5
Lockhart "Riv-Nut Kit" to secure the end of shimmy damper to the frame. Cost: $12.50. The alternative is to secure the end of the damper to the existing connector on the side of the frame; it fits inside the main fairing, but the downside is that you have to remove the plastic "faux-carbon" panel on the inside of the upper fairing (or modify it).

6
WORLD OF CARBON has a very nice simple 916 style shimmy damper mount, www.eastmidlands.co.uk/qbcarbon.

7
If a "916" style Ohlins damper with carbon fiber / aluminum brackets is your preferred product then call QB carbon in the UK # 011-44-115-989-4468. It is better than the Harris one and cost $422.00 delivered to my door in Florida in one week. Well made, full steering lock, no drilling or mods required! I tried 4 different dampers & spent 4 months looking before I bought this. Call John Merryll he is the owner. The also have other great parts for the R1.

8
Storz Damper, Yamaha Suzuki Sports Center, Sea Side C.A. (831)899-2401 Part#22208 $299.95

9
Just bought the brand spanking new BOLT ON version of Scotts Steering Stabilizer for my '99 R1. Installed it in 20mins. This thing KICKS SERIOUS ASS!!!! No drilling required. The kit came with detailed instructions, an allen wrench, and even lock-tite. Fit and finish are excellent. I had a question about proper use of grease and Scott (the owner) called me back twice! Once to give me the help I needed and another time to make sure everything went well. Service was bar none. I highly recommend this unit to anyone looking for a damper.

10
http://www.scottsperformance.com     Scotts Steering Dampers page.

11
Just bought the brand spanking new BOLT ON version of Scotts Steering Stabilizer for my '99 R1. Installed it in 20mins. This thing KICKS SERIOUS ASS!!!! No drilling required. The kit came with detailed instructions, an allen wrench, and even lock-tite. Fit and finish are excellent. I had a question about proper use of grease and Scott (the owner) called me back twice! Once to give me the help I needed and another time to make sure everything went well. Service was bar none. I highly recommend this unit to anyone looking for a damper.

12
http://www.kyleusa.com
Kyle Racing shimmy damper kit

Suspension Set-up Info/Support
1
http://www.race-tech.com     Suspension set up info

2
Ontario Mototech/Kaz Yoshima
Particularly strong suspension setup support for racers

3
GMD Computrac in Atlanta, optimized the geometry figures on the R1 for the 207GP 3/19/99: 404-297-8464 in Atlanta, GA. Ask for Kent or Tracy.

4
http://www.harrisperformance.com

5
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~kenrussell/suspension/racemoto.htm

6
http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Garage/1278/ClubGuide.html

7
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~kenrussell/suspension/circuit1.htm

8
http://www.algonet.se/~leffew/suspens.htm

9
http://www.ansusa.com/SuspensionGuide.htm

10
A recent issue of Cycle World discussed having the rear shock on their long term test bike rebuilt by DeWayne Jones Performance Suspension (909/626-2751) for $175. For that amount, "Jones altered the valving, increasing both compression-and rebound-damping resistance. Overall length also was increased by 5mm for improved cornering clearance."

12
http://members.ols.net/~jcborre/enthusia.htm
Curly's sport's bike page: Includes some suspension set-up info.
 

Suspension Setup
Recommended Suspension Settings
1
Settings suggested by Superbike/SetUp Engineering; Rebound (F) Max (R) Max, Compression (F) 10 clicks off (R) 12 off, Preload (standard) (F) 6 rings (R) 4mm.

 2
Preload setting for R1: (F) 6 rings, (R) 4mm. Which incidentally are the standard settings.

 3
These are the best settings for the YZF-R1 in Imola:

 FRONT: spring pre-load: 3 clicks OUT
hyd-brake extension: 1/4 turn OPEN (starting from ALL CLOSED
hyd-brake compression: 1/4 turn OPEN (starting from ALL CLOSED)
REAR: spring pre-load: 1 millimeter (0,04 inches)
hyd-brake extension: 13 clicks OPEN (starting from ALL CLOSED)
hyd-brake compression: 5 clicks OPEN (starting from ALL CLOSED)

 4
My ideal settings, using the bike 90% in road and 10% in track, for my weight (70 kgs.), are the following:
Front:
Rebound: 2 clicks out from max
Preload: 4 lines out
Compression: Stock
Rear:
Rebound: 2 clicks out from max
Preload: 5th position from min
Compression: 5 clicks out from max

 5
More suspension settings (150# rider/personal settings on two different R1's):
Both bikes...Tyre pressure 36 front, 39 rear (D207)
Bike 1
Bike 2 was a little "wallowy" on Bike 1 settings, and sag wasn't quite right, so...
Front:
Pre-load 5.
Rebound 2 out.
Compression 5 out.
Front:
pre load 6.
Rebound 1 out.
Compression 11 out.
Rear:
pre-load 5.
rebound 3 out.
Compression 10 out.
Rear:
pre-load 3,
rebound 1 out,
compression 11 out.

 6
I have significantly reduced my front end wobble by setting my suspension and tire pressure per settings I received from Troy. Those of you that have had the same problems might want tinker with your set-up. Troy's set-up:
Front:
Preload=4 lines showing
Comp.=3 clicks from max
Reb.=3 clicks from max

 Rear:
Preload=5th ramp from full soft
comp.=5 clicks from max
Reb.=1 from max
Tire pressures: Front 32psi / Rear 30psi
Steering damper set near full loose/ to start with.

 7
Those are my settings and are what has worked best for me at Willow Springs Raceway. I weigh 150 lbs and had to use a lot of preload to gain more ground clearance. I did not post my settings on the forum because I know they would not work for everyone. But I e-mailed them to Phil because I run D207GPs and have had many different weight riders (150 - 200 lbs + ) ride my bike with those settings and experience no stability problems and I figured this would help him determine if his D207GPs are the main problem. If anyone is having straight line stability problems, try the above settings, but what works for each person while cornering will be much different, and more dependant on weeight and riding style.

 8
I have changed my suspension settings to get the bike dialed in for me, including using triple clamps from Graves. One thing to think about is riding position. Part of the high speed handling on the bike is related to front-end lift, particularly bad on this bike - IN MY OPINION. Someone posted something recently about sitting at the tank, when tucked in, contrary to my usual, and it helped, as did changing my ride heights slightly to change the wind angle. Taking off the mirrors to ride it to track days (so all I have to do when I get there is tape the headlight and the taillight) made a difference bigtime noticeable in this lift. The mirrors cause turbulence which disappears when removed, but also the front-end lift gets worse and the bike has a little more drag. The lift is real noticeable, the extra drag, less so. (You can top out on a measured area, then take the mirrors off and you will see it takes longer to top out.)

 The lift becomes really more noticeable as it will wheelie much easier through the gears at full throttle. As the horsepower has not changed this is really evident, even in 4th, it will come off slightly (1/4 inch ~ 1/2 inch) whereas it does not with the mirrors on.

 If you do not believe me, cool - but it is easy to check for yourself, get a road out in the middle of nowhere and try it for yourself, it will be a real eye opener, trust me, you'll see for yourself.

 Suspension Set-up
1
Here is a old trick to aid in fork adjustment. Put a tie wrap around one of the sliders, but not too tight or you will damage the dust seal. Every time you get off the bike, look at the position of the tie wrap and move it back up. I weigh 200 lbs (dry, before beer and hot dogs) without helmet and leathers. The front I added two lines of pre-load, compression is 3 clicks out from minimum and rebound is 6 clicks out from max. The rear spring pre-load is at minimum (soft), the compression is 2 clicks out from minimum and the rebound 5 clicks out from max. When I do a wheely, the front almost bottoms out but not quite. During heavy braking, no wheel hop. Feels stable in corners, but if I hit a big bump or some washboard ripples, it stays on track. Stock Dunlops with 36 p.s.i. in front and 40 in rear.

 2
"Scary's" suspension settings:
Front:
Preload 6
Rear:
Preload 5
Rebound 2 out
Rbound 3 out
Compression 5 out
Compression 10 out

 3
Rear suspension setting:
Position 7 / 9 for compression is probably too much - especially for a 150 lb rider. Go back to 5 or even 4. Increase the rebound damping. Does that [REB] also have 9 steps / clicks? You might want to try more spring preload and 7/9 or 8/9 on REBOUND, but only 3/9 for compression. (Good for handling and stability on the road).

 4
Check suspension settings by turning them all the way in and remembering how many clicks, (so you know where you were) and how many clicks out they will go, any clicks past what the manual says it has for adjustment generally will not do anything.

 5
Note: He only weights 126#
Hugodm"s suspension settings
Front: Rear:
Preload : 6 rings (=stock) Preload : 4 (=stock)
Rebound : 6 out from max (= 1 more than stock) Rebound : 7 out from max (1 more than stock)
Compression : 6 out from max (= 1 more than stock) Compression : 10 out from max (2 more than stock)

6
From FastBikes May '99.
Bit of an article on suspension setup and they ended up taking their R1 to James Wilson (ex GP mechanic, racer and now runs Set-Up suspension) for a tweak. No internal tweaks permitted with the budget given. After a road test - "Very shakey with harsh feedback through the bars going onto bumps. Crossing road repair joints under acceleration caused the whole bike to leave the ground. Feels like too much compression damping. Rebound may be OK, we'll find out after compression settings achieved."

 Rear: "very harsh rear, kick in bum going onto bumps and harsh clicking just before wheel touches earth again, topping out means not enough rebound, the major cause of the dreaded hi-side. After tweak to rear "got somewhere near approaching control possibility but have reached the shocks max/min capability so no further dialing in is possible."

 Front: " Minimum compression, maximum rebound, minimum preload has made the fork action smoother but is still too harsh to get away from severe bump steering coming off the brakes mid corner, even a ripple while tipping in upsets it as the suspension loads up for the max lean angle."

 "This is as good as it gets without spending money... To take our R1 a stage further it would probably benefit most from a simple fork re-shim, a little " less oil in the forks and a lower deck height".

 7
I think the sag (above) is wrong on the rear. 7 to 10mm is not enough in my experience. The Rear sag should be between 25 and 28 mm and the front should be between 34 and 39 mm. The author makes the point that the clicking sound from the rear on unweighting is a result of too little rebound damping.

 I think part of the problem is too little sag. Sag is the most important adjustment you can make. It sets the operating range for your suspension. With sag adjusted properly, you can work on the other settings.
FRONT original new
Top-out 506mm 506mm
Ride height 472mm 466mm
Sag 34mm 39.5mm
Rebound 2 off max max
Compression 5 off max all off - dead soft
Preload 6 rings 8 rings
Deck height 3mm 3mm
. . .
REAR original new
Preload 4 from min 2 from min
Top-out 526.5mm 526.5mm
Ride height 519.5mm 516.5mm
Sag 7mm 10mm
Compression 5 off max 11 off max
Rebound 6 off max max
This comment added by Mike while copying over - not part of SHILOH's spreadsheet.
With the one possible exception that I'd try less than maximum front rebound damping if I found the front ratchetting down and causing patter, those are almost exactly the settings I'd use on the road. It's nice to see someone thinks the way I do.

 8
I note with interest that FastBoys advise settings which are similar (in concept) to what I suggested -
1 - fairly normal amount of preload / sag at the back
2 - a bit more than normal sag : less than normal preload at the front
3 - not much compression damping at the front
4 - about average rebound damping at the front
5 - very little compression damping at the back
6 - as much damn rebound damping at the back as you can get
This is not to say that I'm right or they're right, just that I find it interesting that we think the same way.

 9
Kevin Curtain who won Production Superbike and Formula Extreme on a R1 last year ( in Australia ) dropped the forks through the triple clamps (raised the ride height) after grinding away the alternator cover and having to retire in the first race of the season. He uses a Penske rear shock with the ride height adjusted about 15mm. He consistently has sparks flying from his bike, not knee scrapers or footpegs, when cornering. I am not sure how much he raised it as he wouldnt say.

 10
First Person: Club racer's Guide article on Roadracing world is a great help when your are trying to set up your suspension. Specially from June '98 foward.

 11
Good suspension set-up site:
http://www.ozemail.com.au/~kenrussell/home.htm

 12
Jordan Engineering

 13
I noticed the front end "pushing" with the standard d207's but when I went to GP's it went away. On the track I was out cornering other R1's and noticed no problem with the front. I also have a Ohlins rear shock with the ride height adjusted up 21mm and the front forks are standard except for two clicks each on rebound and compression.

 14
I was at the track last Saturday. I noticed the front end pushing near the exit of a long bumpy corner. I came back in and talked with my friend about it. He suggested that I back off on the rebound damping two clicks (I was running one click out from max because the R1 has little rebound damping). Backing off on the rebound damping completely solved the problem. I am running 207GPs. I can't imagine riding hard enough on the street to feel the front end push. At the track the R1 was very well behaved, even in 100+ mph knee dragging corners.

 15
My advice: Put the rear preload in the 6th position, put the rebound and compression two clicks out from max, fit a steering damper and do not fit tyres with triangular profile.

 16
Tires with triangular profiles: Michelin Hi-Sport TX-15/25 and Dunlop D-207 GP.

 17
Maxton Engineering Specification Sheet - Printed 15/2/99 - 4.52:06pm

 Make_model Yamaha R1 : year - 1998 onwards
Front:
The forks on the R1 are probably the best pair of roadgoing forks fitted as standard suspension to a bike, however they still have their problems if ridden hard or raced. The springs are soft and bottom under heavy breaking. This depends on your rider weight and again, how hard you ride the bike. They also don't have enough rebound damping. We modify your forks, fitting harder springs to suit what type of riding you do and also your rider weight. We also revalve your cartridges, increasing the rebound damping. We also replace the existing hydraulic bump-stops with spring bumpstops, which eliminates the severe patter which occoures when the forks bottom out. This also gives the rider more feel mid-corner when pushing the front end. The fork conversion costs 185.00 pounds plus worn parts. Seals are 14.00 pounds and bushes are 18.00 pounds - (ALL PRICES EXCLUSIVE OF V.A.T.) We feel that once converted the forks are the best set of standard forks fitted to any bike.

 Rear:
The rear - again - is good for general road use, although the spring may be a little soft if you are above the average weight of rider. The other problem with the unit is that it doesn't have enough compression damping and over the first 5mm of travel in the shock, there is a fault with the unit where there is hardly any compression damping at all. This causes the bike to sit down a little when exiting a corner, making the front feel light and twitchy or nervous on bumpy roads. This is only temporary as the spring helps the bike recover. You can not cure the problem by revalving the unit and therefore all we can do is supply you with a replacement unit, which is a Maxton/Koni unit that is fully adjustable via a shim-stack system and has a spring to suit your rider style and weight. There are two types of unit, one with a remote resevoir that has a second compression damping adjuster on it that costs 440.00 pounds, and without that costs 395.00 pounds. Both are fully adjustable. We reccommend the remote resevoir unit if you are racing.

 Other info:
The staunchens on these forks don't screw into the bottom rackets deep enough for the amount of leverage on the backets from the breaks. This has been a problem on other Yamaha forks in the past, and after a certain milage we feel these forks will leak. Obviously this depends on many things, like how many pot-hole you run through, how many wheelies and stoppies you do, etc.

 Steering Damper Clamp diameter - 54mm.

 18
Regarding Maxton's information - I must say the information they provided was exactly the same as I got from 2 other suspension tuners. The general consensus from the mall was: Start with the rear shock, then do the forks. And further - the forks need springs to match your weight, and better rebound. Compression is fine for most people and use.

 Having had these mods done myself, I must say it certainly transforms the R1's handling. Flicks more easily, holds a tighter line, smooth instead of harsh over bumps, no sqaut.

 19
I installed the valves myself and it's fairly straightforward. I've explained the technique for dismantling the forks before, in a previous post. Search and you should find it. [ Well I wish I could find it - Mike.]

To change the rebound valves (I assume you have at least got the rebound valves, they are what you need the most) you need to heat the bottom of the cartridge to 120 deg C, to be able to remove the compression valve. The compression valve is Locktited in, and it's impossible to break the seal without heat.

 From the pushrod, remove the screw at the middle, then the two split-rings and the rubber bump-stop. Then slide the whole unit down the cartidge and out.

 Put the pushrod in a wrench (there's a holder for it with the rebound kit) and remove the old rebound valve at the end of the pushrod. Install the new rebound items, following the instructions in the rebound manual, and you should be fine. When you install the pushrod, it's a bit tricky to get the seal around the rebound valve into the cartridge. Take your time and you'll be fine. Remember to use Locktite on the rebound valve to the shaft, and the nut to the rebound valve. Be careful not to use too much Locktites as you [stand the] risk to block the valve. Check it all before assembly and use compressed air to remove any dirt in the valve or inside the pushrod.

 You need to cut the rebound adjustment rods. The procedure is described in the manual that comes with the kit. Make sure they are not too long or else you risk blocking [jamming?] the needle in the valve and you will need to open the forks again.

 When fitting the cap on top of the forks to the pushrod, make sure the nut is exactly 11mm from the top of the shaft. Longer down [sic] and you risk pushing the needle too far down and [completely] block the rebound valve. Before you assemble the forks, check that you have the correct amount of clicks on the rebound adjuster. Too few means you didn't remove enough from the rebound adjustment rods.

 Regarding installation of the compression Gold valve: It's quite easy, just follow the instructions that come with the kit.

 That should be about it. If you decide to do the work yourself, and become in doubt about anything, feel free to send me a mail. [Which I'd do in a flash if I knew what your e-mail was . . . ] You can also call Race-Tech who'll answer any questions you might have. [Ditto...]

 20 [ is the same as #7 under Reccommended Suspension settings.]
Those are my settings and are what has worked best for me at Willow Springs Raceway. I weigh 150 lbs and had to use a lot of preload to gain more ground clearance. I did not post my settings on the forum because I know they would not work for everyone. But I e-mailed them to Phil because I run D207GPs and have had many different weight riders (150 - 200 lbs + ) ride my bike with those settings and experience no stability problems and I figured this would help him determine if his D207GPs are the main problem. If anyone is having straight line stability problems, try the above settings, but what works for each person while cornering will be much different, and more dependant on weeight and riding style.

 21 [ is the same as #8 under Reccommended Suspension settings.]
I have changed my suspension settings to get the bike dialed in for me, including using triple clamps from Graves. One thing to think about is riding position. Part of the high speed handling on the bike is related to front-end lift, particularly bad on this bike - IN MY OPINION. Someone posted something recently about sitting at the tank, when tucked in, contrary to my usual, and it helped, as did changing my ride heights slightly to change the wind angle. Taking off the mirrors to ride it to track days (so all I have to do when I get there is tape the headlight and the taillight) made a difference bigtime noticeable in this lift. The mirrors cause turbulence which disappears when removed, but also the front-end lift gets worse and the bike has a little more drag. The lift is real noticeable, the extra drag, less so. (You can top out on a measured area, then take the mirrors off and you will see it takes longer to top out.)

 The lift becomes really more noticeable as it will wheelie much easier through the gears at full throttle. As the horsepower has not changed this is really evident, even in 4th, it will come off slightly (1/4 inch ~ 1/2 inch) whereas it does not with the mirrors on.

 If you do not believe me, cool - but it is easy to check for yourself, get a road out in the middle of nowhere and try it for yourself, it will be a real eye opener, trust me, you'll see for yourself.

 22
OK, I was thinking:
You've lowered the forks 5mm, that means you now have them around 14mm higher in the clamps than before, right? I believe you will be better off if you set them at no more than 11mm.

 There are several reasons for this, some of them dependant of each other. Drop the forks to much, and you will suffer ground clearance, but you will also reduce feel to some extent, and grip may suffer too.

I do not believe there will be a clearance problem at 11mm, but take the measurements I described earlier to be sure. It's silly to risk a crash because the front fender hits the yokes or fairing.

If you don't suffer any ground clearance problems, you are not going very fast through the curves, and hence, you should be fine with a slightly slower steering and more stability. Set the forks so that approx. 5mm is visible above the upper clamp.

 Dropping the forks put more weight on the front, unless you are fast on the gas in the curves, you risk overlading your front tire, the front may slide and you will probably crash.

All in all, I believe there are gains to be had from dropping the forks, but it would be much better if you could raise the rear instead. That would give the same benefits, but you would get rid of the risk of decking out too early. If you can get hold of a 5mm shorter rear shock linkage, your bike will lift 11mm at the rear, and make the shock a bit more progressive with it. That's what I would do if I didn't have an adjustable shock. Hope this helps.
Joerund

23
Two things that can be changed are the fluid (sometimes switching brands or viscosity can help with stiction). The other and more expensive alternative is getting the fork tubes coated with something like titanium nitride.

 24
I'm using Motorex 5W , as per Zupin recomendation (to reduce fork stiction).

 25
In very general terms, the rule of thumb is...the harder you ride, the harder the compression settings should be. Rebound does not need to be set much harder, as you want to allow the wheels to track the surface without skipping or skimming over bumps.

 26
From http://www.race-tech.com :
For road race bikes, rear sag is typically 25 to 30mm. Street riders usually use 30 to 35mm. Bikes set up for the track are compromised when ridden on the street. The firmer settings commonly used on the track are generally not recommended (or desirable) for road work.

 Front end:
Street bikes run between 25 and 33 percent of their total travel, which equates to 30 to 35mm. Roadrace bikes usually run between 25 and 30mm.
 
 
 

27
Dutch Ohlins site has some good discussion of suspension settings: http://www.ohlins.nl/

 28
The greatest gains come from the rear shock. I have re-valved and resprung the front, and while this did make the bike better, it was nothing compared to the gains from my Ohlins shock.

 Actually, I believe the stock shock would be fine if it just had ride height adjustment and a stronger spring. With more power you will experience more squat, and the spring is much too soft for your weight anyway.

 I therefore suggest you start with the rear. If you don't want to get a new, expensive shock, get a new spring to suit your weight. (8.5 should be a good place to start. And get a shorter linkage - should be 5mm shorter to lift th rear a bit over 10mm and increase the progression. The adjustable one from Canada is nice, but much too expensive in my opinion. These mods have been tested in German mags. The 5mm shorter link gave the best combined handling.

 Combined with a stronger spring you should be well off. Then, you could always have RaceTech revalve your shock, which should make it suit you better.

 After you've done this, you can think about the front. Get stronger springs to suit your weight. I guess 0.90 or 0.95 should be fine. Get teh RaceTech rebound kit - and that is it. Compression on the R1 forks is good, but you could always ask someone for an altered compression shim stack for an R1 if you want one. Buying the RaceTech Gold valve compression valve is ok, but really not necessary. There's not much to be gained there.

 29
Don't bother with the revalving, save your money up and go for the Ohlins I think the to your door price is about $750. I did the revalving on my cbr and it was soooo much better than stock, but no where near as good as the Ohlins.

 30
You may want to consider .95 springs. Computrack set mine up with Racetech .95 springs, and they actually tested out at .93. I only weigh 185 in full gear, and my front end does not feel harsh at all. You don't need nearly as much preload or compression damping as with the lighter springs.

 31
It still requires a fair amount of counter steering to change direction at high speed, but the package of fork rework and Ohlins shock made a drastic improvement in steering precision, stability, and its ability to hold a line without wavering, even on rough surfaces. Also, I think a major factor in the oversteer/understeer characteristics is tire selection.

 32
After I got the Ohlins shock, and increased the ride height to max (rear lift 11mm), high(er)-speed turning definitely became easier and more precise. On a stretch of road I ride fairly often, I used to go through a lot of s-cruves at around 80mph. Before I got the Ohlins, I really had to muscle the bike to hold a tight line at this speed, but with the Ohlins installed, the bike was no longer reluctant to turn, and both higher speed and tighter lines was easy to obtain. Compared to the R6, for instance, I still find the R1 a bit hard to turn, but it has become much, much better, both at high and low speed turns.

 33
I have not had the opportunity to do any track time since the fork mods and .95 springs. As Charlie says, the ride is plush. Have no fears for .95 springs.
FWIW, Lindemann recommended 1.0 springs. I know it is hard to make these decisions when you get so many inputs. My choice was between Race Tech's and Lindemann's recommendations.

 34
Here is a little food for thought should you decide to play with your geometry. As I'm sure you can understand, you will hear different version depending on who you talk to, so for perspective, this is based on experience with my old racebike(GSXR)and tuning by GMD.

 Basically you are looking at four important factors. Rake, trail, wheelbase, and swingarm angle. Suspension heights (front and rear) effect all four of these, and each of them accomplish a different thing. You basically have to understand how they work together and what a change in set-up does to each. That is not something easily explained in a post, so let just look at the question.

 Triple clamps effect trail only. Rake is effected by changes in the attitude (ride heights and steering head angle).

 Less offset = equals more trail = more stability. You effectively reduce the machines willingness to deflect the front wheel. The common misconception is that this SLOWS your steering down, which is not true. It will increase the steering EFFORT, but rate of turn is a function of rake.

 So to actually slow your steering, you would have to increase your rake, which would only happen by lowering the rear ride height, or going with taller front tire profile/shorter rear.

 So other than tire profile, tires main effect have to do with ride height, so you have to get the spec from the manufacturer to compensate.

Typically, rear ride height are done by racers to optimize swingarm angles (effects drive and traction) and get the right rake angles(speed of steering)for given tire combinations and ground clearance issues. Once those are set, they use a particular steering head eccentric to get the right trail numbers (effort and stability).

Street folks jack their back ends up because they think it looks cool and see racers do it. Generally its the wrong thing to do, but it speeds steering (perceived as easier to steer) to the detriment of stability, but they dont ride at speeds where its an issue. Some folks like a twitchier feel. So it really preference for street use. But if you go to the track (which I know you do), you may want other settings.

 35
>Street folks jack their back
>ends up because they think it
>looks cool and see racers do
>it. Generally its the wrong
>thing to do
Could you explain why, more exactly? On the R1, there's not many other possibilities to quicken the steering, and personally I haven't experienced any ill effects. I haven't been to the track since my latest changes though (see my post yesterday in the Aftershocks thread)
Joerund

lets assume that all other adjustments are static and you are only changing rear ride height.

 As you raise the back end, you are decreasing your trail, rake, and wheelbase, while increasing the swingarm angle. The effect will be noticeable as the bike will turn in quicker and with less effort. But the tradeoff is that it is less stable (high speed) and may have a tendency to fall in at the front. Another important thing is that you will lose considerable front end feel, so you can lose the front more quickly as slides will be less linear and less controllable. In my opinion, that is why raising the back on its own is a bad bad bad thing. Obviously, rear ride hieght is one of the adjustments that can have the most effect on geometry.

Now for most street use, that may be OK as folks dont tend to ride the front as hard and will perceive the easier steering effort as better handling. Again a preference. When we ride on the street, I think we tend to be a lazy bunch (I know I am) and like the bike to flick in with just a tap on the bars, but the R1 demands that you really mean it. It will reward your efforts and steer plenty fast. like anything, you get out of it what you put into it

 Now in your case, you have a different front end (fork length and where they are in the triple could have changed your front ride height)and probably different tires, so I wouldnt know where your current set up is. So it you set your front ride height higher (unintentionally) and raised the back at the same time, you may have netted out the changes with the exception of a bit more ground clearance.

Perceptions are a big thing. What you might try to satisfy your curiosity is go out for a little ride, then bring the back end up 5mm to 10mm without changing anything else and ride it again, then set it back and ride it again. You'll see and feel the difference.

 In Jeff's case, the offset's most critical change is in the trail not the wheelbase. The marginally effected wheelbase is a collateral change you could almost ignore. If you raise the back to get the wheelbase shorter, you just lost what you gained by changing your triple clamps offset to get more trail as trail decreased when the back end went up (vicious circle isn't it??).

 The best thing anyone can do is measure their ride heights and geomtry before making changes and change one thing at a time and measure the effect to make sure your headed the direction you want to go before changing other things.

 36
>controllable. In my opinion,
>that is why raising the back
>on its own is a bad bad bad
>thing. Obviously, rear ride
>hieght is one of the
>adjustments that can have the
>most effect on geometry.
I haven't tried my setup on the track yet. For agressive steet use, it seems fine though, and I think I have a lot of feedback from the front. Before I raised the forks the last 4mm, the bike had a pronounced tendency to run wide. But as you wrote later in your post, I don't know the distance from the wheel axle on the stock forks, I may very well have the same ride height at the front now, as when I was using the stock forks.

snip...

 >So it you
>set your front ride height
>higher (unintentionally) and
>raised the back at the same
>time, you may have netted out
>the changes with the exception
>of a bit more ground
>clearance.
But the higher CG would also make the bike steer quicker, wouldn't it?

 >What you might try to satisfy
>your curiosity is go out for a
>little ride, then bring the
>back end up 5mm to 10mm
>without changing anything else
>and ride it again, then set it
>back and ride it again. You'll
>see and feel the difference.
Can't raise the rear more than the 11mm I have at the moment. Of course, I could lower it, but that would proably make the tendency to run wide come back. Raise the rear or lower the front, the result should be the same, or did I miss something?

 snip...

 >The best thing anyone can do
>is measure their ride heights
>and geomtry before making
>changes and change one thing
>at a time and measure the
>effect to make sure your
>headed the direction you want
>to go before changing other
>things.
Agreed, and I should have done this before I got the Ohlins installed. The bike was at my dealer though, and I got it back with the Ohlins forks on, and the old forks disassembled.

Like I wrote before, if anyone would care to masure the distance of the stock forks (while fully extended) from the wheelaxle to the top of the upper tripple clamp, I would really appreciate it.
Joerund

37
With respect to measurement. The best way to measure the front ride height is select a point of reference (I usually use the bottom of the steering head) and measure the height with the forks extended, to the ground (perpendicular). Measureing to the axle may not work for you as any difference in fork stroke between stock and Ohlins would make that length different, and it is not telling you how the tire factors into the equation. For example, a Metzler slick is taller than a Dunlop slick (for the same size) by about 10mm, So changing tires effects height thought the forks were not moved.

 I am assuming that when you say you raised your forks, you pulled them up in the triples, which lowers your front ride height. This will quicken and reduce effort, and would tend to lessen a tendency to "run wide" for the same level of steering input.

 You are right in that droping the rear and raising the front are similar. Generally, you get more change with the rear than with the front for small amounts.

 If you still have your old forks, you should check and see how their overall extended length compares from the cap to the axle. If they were put into the triple so that the caps were just over the top clamp like stock, but they are longer, then you may have raised your front ride height quite a bit. That would of course make your bike steer like a truck.

38
I've snipped different parts from your last 2 answers to me.

snip..

 >fall in at the front. Another important
>thing is that you will lose considerable
>front end feel, so you can lose the front
>more quickly as slides will be less linear
>and less controllable. In my opinion, that
>is why raising the back on its own is a bad
>bad bad thing.

I do not disagree to the general theory behind your arguments, but being a bit more specific; Raising the rear on the R1 has been done by several racers and magazines trying to optimize the chassis for better handling. German mag Motorrad Reisen & Sport (among some) tested different shocks and ride height adjusters, and found the fastest lap times combined with best feedback by raising the rear 11mm.

Personally, I've had no ill effects by raising the rear. Stability is still good, over rough spots, cranked over and at high(ish) speed straights. I've got more weight at the front, which I personally like, but it demands early(er) use of the gas in curves at high speed to avoid overloading the front tire. Earlier this year, I had a couple of smaller frontend slides due to being late at the gas, a result of charging in to the curve. My mistake in other words.

snip...
>but the R1 demands that you really mean it.
>It will reward your efforts and steer
>plenty fast. like anything, you get out of
>it what you put into it

 That is true, but again, the R1 with the chassis set at stock ride height is usually suffering at tight tracks, while being among the quickest at tracks with more high speed curves. In Sweden, there's a track called Knutstorp (http://www.t.kth.se/t94_lom/smr/tracks/ktorp.htm) This is a tight track, tighter than it looks like at the pics on the website, and here the R1's steering is slow no matter how much pressure you put on the bars. More rear ride height make the R1 much easier to go fast with at this track, with no ill effects what so ever.

 >Now in your case, you have a different
>front end (fork length and where they are
>in the triple could have changed your front
>ride height)and probably different tires,
>so I wouldnt know where your current set up
>is. So it you set your front ride height
>higher (unintentionally) and raised the
>back at the same time, you may have netted
>out the changes with the exception of a bit
>more ground clearance.

>With respect to measurement.
>The best way to measure the
>front ride height is select a
>point of reference (I usually
>use the bottom of the steering
>head) and measure the height
>with the forks extended, to
>the ground (perpendicular).
>Measureing to the axle may not
>work for you as any difference
>in fork stroke between stock
>and Ohlins would make that
>length different, and it is
>not telling you how the tire
>factors into the equation. For
>example, a Metzler slick is
>taller than a Dunlop slick
>(for the same size) by about
>10mm, So changing tires
>effects height thought the
>forks were not moved.

 I went to a dealer and measured the length of the stock forks. Comparing the length to the Ohlins, taking into account the difference in total fork travel (120mm Ohlins, 135mm stock), the sag I used with the stock forks, and the sag I have now, I had 2-3mm more front ride height with the Ohlins before I raised them 1 more line (4mm).

 After raising the forks 4 more mm, I am now riding around 2mm lower at the front than with the stock forks. However, the springs are stiffer, so in curves the ride height is probably very close to what I had with the stock forks and .90 Race-Tech springs.

The summary to all this is that I'm running with about the same ride height at the front as stock, but the rear is 11mm higher than with the stock shock. All these measurements are valid with the Pilot Sports I had installed until last week.

snip...
>I am assuming that when you
>say you raised your forks, you
>pulled them up in the triples,

 Yes, that's what I mean.


Like I wrote in the beginning of this post: I certainly agree to your arguments regarding changes of ride height. Higher is not necessarily better. However, for the R1, I do not believe the changes I've done make the bike significantly worse in any area, so far, I have only positive experiences from the alterations. Regarding altered swing arm angle; The long swingarm on the R1 is reducing the ill effects raising the rear might lead to. The chains is not dragging against it, and I haven't noticed an increase in squat due to the changes.

I will of course get a better chance to evaluate all this when I get back to the tracks after the winter. Until then, I do believe I've found a better setup than the stock settings. The front is more planted, although (a bit more) sensitive to correct throttle control in curves, steering is more responsive, and stability hasn't suffered.
Joerund


Rider Suspension Comments 1
Had mine out in the track last week and the four clicks out I was using on the street worked great on the track as well. so I guess we all agree, four clicks out.

 2
Get someone to push down hard at the back of the seat pod while you are sitting on the bike, and see if it compresses and rises at about the same rate. You'd be surprised how often the factory settings are way off.

 3
Ohlins is in the position that the rod is to the left and the knurled adjustment knob is to the right. Do: 1) My damper bracket on the Ohlins is positioned to the left, only 37.60mm (1.48 inches) in from the left end of the damper.
Do: 2) From the bottom of the black triple clamp to the top of the BW fork bracket (inside measurement) my distance is 104.68mm (4.12 inches).
3) Looking down the left fork-tube on the BW fork bracket from above: it is facing fairly close to straight-forward. That is seen as the right side of the bracket looks angled (like a backslash \) at about 30 degrees...this you need to play with, carefully

 4
I had all the Race Tech stuff installed in my first R1's forks by GMD Computrac. When they got them right, they worked awesome. I also got a Penske shock. My bike handled phenomenally. Mine was the first R1 that they had seen, and it took a little trial and error. This was in '98, when the bike was first released.

 The Race Tech Ultra Slick fluid, the suspected culprit, caused the fork seals to swell. This created a good bit of stiction in the front.

 5
I'm installing Race Tech .85 (stock is .80) front springs and want to increase the weight of the fork oil slightly - 2 1/2 wt if I can. The R1 uses 'Suspension oil "01"', which is 10 weight oil in the front forks.

 6
I had the bike computracked. The front is down 8 mm, the rear is adjusted as high as we could set the Ohlins shock and really should be 5mm more. I am running an Attack triple clamp at 29 mm, stock is 35 mm. If you are running a stock triple clamp be careful not to lower the front end more than 5 mm or the front end will tend to tuck.

 7
Dunlop D207ZR vs. D207GP stability problem could be related to tire diameter.
Sportmax front 23.74"
Sportmax rear 25.03"
GP front 23.46"
GP rear 25.27"
Ride height changes about -3.5mm front and +3mm rear, which actually sounds like a good thing to me.

 8
I had a little problem with the bike shaking a little on me at high speeds and decided to try and readjust the suspension set up a little. I had it set for 30mm sag in the rear. I softened it just a little and it took all of the shake out. I was surprised at how just a little adjustment on the rear shock improved high speed stability.

 9
Why did Santo specify his Penske rear shock 1/4" longer than stock?:

I wanted the shock body longer, to quicken the steering response. When tooling around, the steering is OK, but at high speed, the R1 requires considerable effort to get it to turn in quickly. Longer clip-on's will give you additional leverage to help, and there are a number of different ways to actually quicken the response, such as changing the steering head angle(super expensive), or lowering the front end, by sliding the fork tubes up in the triple clamps, but doing so creates problems with ground clearance. Using a longer rear shock was in my opinion, the best way to achieve the desired results.

 10
What is what is nice about Penske is their willingness to build a shock the way you want it. They will also up grade your shocks for you if you buy one of their less expensive ones and later decide you want to upgrade to the next level.

 11
How do you tell where the standard (neutral) ride height setting is on the Ohlins (+0 -0). Is it near the gap in the thread about 10mm or so from the start of the thread ? The manual that you get with the shock does NOT mention anything about amounts of ride height adjustment. It just shows where the adjuster is and thats all.

 Answer 1: You compare each of the shocks height when you got them in your hands.
Answer 2: If you've already installed it - when the end eye is threaded all the way in, it is at -1mm.


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Topic: database - 7 - Wheels (1) (23 of 30), Read 2606 times 
Conf: R1 tech info - read only
From: Deleted () 
Date: Friday, January 21, 2000 01:09 AM 

Wheel Related - General
1
In England, Yamaha supplies the R1 with MEZ3 tyres as standard; most people change these ASAP for BT56SS, Pirelli Dragon Corsas or Avon Azaros.

 2
Never buy bearings from Yamaha. All bearings are standard bearings, and 99.99 % are metric. You should be able to get the #'s off of them, and then call your local bearing supplier. If there are no #'s just take them down there and they should be able to set you up.( In case anyone didn't already know ) Jeff J.

 3
Running to the edge of the tires wont scrape anything, I still get to the edge, despite the cold weather. Without confidence in the tires, it can be scary for sure. Get some Pilots, BT56SS, or Pirelli EVO, they are all predictable tires with good grip and feedback. My personal favorite is the Pilot Sport though. What you say about the Azaros is about the same that I've read in several tire tests this year. Not a bad tire, but not as good as the best, far from it.

 4
CHAPARRAL RACING $107.95 for Dunlop D207's from 800-841-2960
555 South "H" St.
San Bernardino CA 92410
http://www.chaparral-racing.com

5
http://www.imotorcyclestore.com Excellent tire prices and other motorcycle accessories.

 6
T.A.W. Vehicle Concepts,inc.
Lakewood, Colorado 80228BR> 12860 West Cedar Drive, Suite 200A
1-888-235-0910 (ask for Tom)

 Pressures
1
36 front 40 back seems high. i've been running 34/35, which suits me fine, even at "high speeds". I figure I have a slightly bigger contact patch.

 2
For D207's: 30 psi front and rear works well for either street or track. Higher pressures made the bike slide more and was less stable at high speed. The negative is slightly slower steering so I dropped the front end slightly. The front end grip and feedback works great for me with this setup.

 3
On MEZ3s I used 35.5 front & back - on D207s I use 36 Front, 39 rear. This grips well for me, but is a little unstable in a straight line.

 Metzler
1
Impressed with the amount of front end feedback, and the rear gave a lot more traction than the stock 207. For aggressive riding the MEZ1's are better tires than stock 207's; feel and grip are twice as confidence inspiring turn-in is only slightly slower. Would like to try the new MEZ3 racing compound as well.

 2
Metzeler MEZ4 Basically the replacement of the Z2 but stickier and longer wearing; may not be quite as sticky as the 207's (very close), but they are easier to read with more feedback and more confidence inspiring. Metzelers line will cure 75% of the bikes tendency to wobble.

 3
Metzeler MEZ3's
120/70x17 $174.80
180/55x17 $213.90
190/50x17 $229.80

 4
The hot set up would be an MEZ 3 on the front and an MEZ 4 rear.

 5
Metzelers Z3 (I like Racing compound in the front and standard in the rear). They are almost the same, but in the front the Z3 makes the difference due to its zero degree steel belt and this is just what the R1 needs.

 6
The best application I've run is the Z3 on the front and Z4 on the rear. The only better combination for the street I've found is using the race compound MEZ3 on the front. Front and rear will wear out close to the same mileage.

 Dunlop
1
If you want to replace the D207 with the same tire, make sure it is a D207 L. If not the bikes handling will change for the worse. The D207 L is made for the R1.

 2
The standard 207ZR would work fine on the R-1. I'm just going to take the standard 207 rather than wait another month. Incidentally I've been using a slightly used 207GP as a loaner and I don't notice a difference, except in traction of course.

 3
I used to have 207GP's on my 7R and later on my 916. THE best tyre for the front, THE worst tyre for the rear (bar Dragon corsas). Treaded tyres cannot handle 135bhp, seems to be the general conclusion.

 4
The Dunlop D207GP front is the best front and the Michelin Race 3 rear is the best rear.

 5
The tires that I like most are the D207 GPs. The Metzeler MEZ1 Race compound pale in comparison.

 6
Dunlop D207ZR vs. D207GP stability problem could be related to tire diameter.
Sportmax front 23.74"
Sportmax rear 25.03"
GP front 23.46"
GP rear 25.27"
Ride height changes about -3.5mm front and +3mm rear, which actually sounds like a good thing to me.

 7
Dunlop's Steve Brubaker's bottom line was this: take the pyrometer and bury it in the bottom drawer of your tool box and leave it there. Go by how the bike handles and feels. An example is endurance racing. Since a thicker tread generates more heat, endurance tires will check *cooler* after running 3 hours than after they first got up to temp. That's one reason tires go off when worn - no rubber left to heat itself up to operating temperature. So if you went by temp alone, what would you do? Drop the pressure to get the heat back? That'd make the tires squirm and stand up in corners on the brakes or off the gas.

Another example is Daytona, where the extended high speeds require a thinner tread to avoid overheating, and one place where higher pressures are necessary, to overcome the centripetal forces imposed by the banking.

 So if lowering the pressures causes poorer turn in, instability and poor handling, what are his recommend numbers? 32 front, 30 rear for the 207GP's again with a +/- 2 lb window. Steve said that the pros might adjust pressure by *one* PSI, and that's so subtle of an adjustment I doubt I could tell the difference. And that's the point, you don't fix handling problems with air pressure changes. They have the luxury of choosing the correct compound to suit the ambient temperature and track in order to maximize traction. But geometry/suspension setup is really how to lower lap times.

 As far as warming up, coming out of tire warmers, the fast guys are up to temp by the end of the first lap, so it really depends on how fast and aggressive you are. Personally, I'll be more cautious for a couple of laps at least.

 They both said that street compound tires have a much wider operating range that grips at much lower temperatures. So track tires on the street are more likely to slide since you don't run at the pace necessary to get them hot enough to work. Conversely, the Pilot Sports will run well on the track, but go off sooner because their ceiling is lower than the race tires. For street tires pressures should be near the bike manufactures recommendations (36 for the R1). Too low and handling goes off. I felt comfortable with the 207 Sport Max's at 33 rear and 32 front, but that's a stiff tire in the first place.

 It all boils down to this. There's no magic device or numbers that you can "set" the tires to. You've just got to ride the bike and feel what it's doing, then adjust the geometry/suspension and ride it again. How does it turn in, is it stable when leaned over, does it squirm around too much on the straights, is it sliding the front or back? And the first thing I'd adjust is my riding style. You've got to capitalize on what the machine is capable of, not force it to do something it can't.

 Is your transition from brakes to throttle so smooth going in that the front suspension barely moves, thus maintaining max traction as cornering forces take over from braking weight transfer? Or do you release the brake too early extending the forks and unloading the tire, then turn in reloading the front? That could be why you slid going in. And there are hundreds of control inputs each lap that have to be done right, or at least consistently, before you can evaluate your setup changes.

 So after talking to both reps I realize that, other than compound, tires are the last thing I'm going to worry about at the track. Just look at them and see if they're chewing up, if not, go faster!

 Michelin
1
Michelin Race 2 and Race 3 on our race bike with MUCH success (currently leading the WERA National Endurance Series on an R1).

 2
I'm using the Michelin Pilot Race tires. They are far more sticky than the Dunlop D207 street compound, and last longer than the Dunlop D207 GP compound. True, you have to run a 180 on the rear wheel. It has a more round profile. It falls into corners quicker, and can be leaned over further than a 190. The front tire is much more neutral steering than the triangle peak of the D207. They do take a little longer to heat up than the D207 GPs. Try doing rolling endos with stock rubber on cold pavement and you will end up crashing.

 3
Just a small comment; According to Michelin, he Race wont stick better than the Sports, unless the Sports are ridden outside their recommended temperature range. To get the Sports too hot, you have to go to the track...

 In other words, there are few benefits, but a quite few liabilities connected to using race tires on the street. This is especially true if the weather is a little cold.

 4
Pilot Race tires are definitely NOT recommended for riding in the rain. They have very poor water wedge out characteristics. For the street, stick w/Pilot Sports

 5
If not on the track, very few people will ever have any gains from the performance of the Pilot Race. I don't know where you live, but if its not hot outside, the Race will never get up to correct operating temperature, and they will give less grip than the Sports (one of my friends crashed because of this).

The carcass of the Race make them less suited for road use. On some road surfaces, they will provide less grip than the Sport, no matter the temperature.

 While grip is extreme at right operating temperature (and surface, like at the track), getting them up to heat can be a problem unless you ride really hard all the time, and especially if the outdoor temp is less than 20-25 celsius. And the Sports provide so much grip that if that is not enough for the street, you really is fast (and crazy ;-)

 That was my reason behind writing the Race is a waste of money for street use. But besides money, under several conditions, they perform worse than the Sports.

 If none of these points are valid for you, you probably will have gains from them even at the street, but then you're not among the average fast rider, you're much better and faster.
Joerund

6
The Pilot Race made a HUGE difference in how the bike handles at the track. The stock Sport Max tires exaggerate the R1's weaknesses. Now it's really neutral at speed and responds to steering inputs like it lost 50 lbs. This is with a totally stock suspension, so I can't wait for my hand to heal so the Ohlins (when it arrives) and Race Tech parts can go on.

 7
I am sure most have heard of the deal that Graves is offering. You get a Race2 rear and a Race Front for 169/set + Shipping. I have had mine on for a week or so and can really notice a difference.

 8
Michelins; Walt Schaefer (256-538-5906) told me that there are Pilot Sports coming into the USA today. You can go to http://www.bibmen.com/price.html but the Sports aren't yet listed. Also the Pilot Race and Soft will have an intermediate compound soon.

 Recommended pressures *for the track* are 30 front, 28 rear. Being radials, pressure and temperature are not proportionally related, so forget the "10-15% pressure rise when hot" reading. Just stay within +/- 2 lbs of the 30/28 numbers. You might drop pressure in the rain, but only to get more rubber on the road.

 The Race compound will take 3-5 laps at 50 degrees F ambient (air) temp to get grippy, less at higher air temps. So if it's cold or you can afford it, run the Softs.

 Look for the Race to work best between 100 -160 degrees Celsius. On a track that doesn't work one side of the tire, it might only get to 80 C.

 The Soft's range starts at 60 - 70 C, and the tire starts to chew up at 140 - 150 C.

 Make sure the probe goes all the way into hit the carcass, then lift up a bit to get a "core" reading, and do it as soon as you pit from a hot lap. Tires cool off very quickly.

The reading will also follow the ambient temp. So if it goes up 3 degrees outside in the afternoon, your tires will also go up 3 degrees.

 Measure at several points across the tire's surface to get a good snapshot of where it's being worked.

 Don't change pressures to change temp. Chassis and suspension settings will have more impact than anything else. If you get the geometry right, then suspension adjustment will dictate how well the tire stays in contact with the track. It'll run cooler the less it bounces around and slides/regains traction. Change the suspension and then take another temp reading. If it's cooler, then you're moving in the right direction, assuming you're riding consistently and achieving the same lap times. The faster you go, the hotter the tire will get, sliding or not.

 9
In other tire tests I've seen, none of the other brands/models could compete with the Pilot Sport on wet grip.

 10
My experiences with race (as in Pilot Race) vs. street (Pilot Sport) tires when used on the street:

 This summer, when it was quite hot, I had no problems using race tires. I merely used them occasionally though (while waiting for new street tires). They needed a bit longer to warm up compared to the street version, but once hot, they worked very well. Stability was not as good as the street counterpart, even though the Pilot Race is much better than the D207GP in this area. On poor asphalt, the Race worked less satisfying, feel was down compared to the street tire.

 Later in the season, when temperature had dropped a bit, race tires was not the tires I would want on my bike. A friend of mine crashed out of a curve using Pilot Race. He'd been driving hard for almost an hour, but suddenly the rear let go, and he lowsided. I didn't have any problems with my Sports the same day, it was a little chilly, but I had plenty of grip and feel. My friend believed the same about his Pilot Race, he pushed a little harder. Then they suddenly let go. He just wasn't able to get them hot enough to grip properly, but he thought he was....

 Pirelli
1
Pirelli's MTR07(front)- MTR08 (rear)
Tread pattern is similar to the normal Dragon's but stops about 2 cm from the edges. On the sidewalls it says Dragon Corsa (molded in the rubber, not a yellow Corsa sticker like the MTR01-02 Corsa).

 2
120/70 ZR 17 (58W) TL MTR 07 Corsa ID-No 9365 Racing front tyre with very light handling characteristics (tri-angular profile), for Supersport Sprint races and longer races on smooth surfaces (soft compound). Pressure : 2,1 bar Best rim :3,5 x 17" 180/55 ZR 17 (73W) TL MTR 08 Corsa ID-No 9386

 Developed in 1997 by P. Casoli and Y. Briguet, a rear Supersport Racing tyre providing excellent side grip and handling characteristics.
Pressure : 1,9 bar Best rim: 5,5 - 6,00 x 17".
There is also a MTR 08 s Corsa ID-No 9369 especially for bikes with 5,00 - 5,5 x 17".

 3
I'm running Pirelli's MTR07(front)- MTR08 (rear) on my bike at the moment and they seem just about perfect for my kind of riding: Street only, warmish weather, continuous fast pace and high speed sweepers. Stable at ANY speed, grippy, and smooth. My installer took a LOT of time balancing my wheels. It seems to make a LOT of difference in how smoothly the bike runs and tracks. Pay your guy (or yourself) something extra to get it exactly right. You'll be a little surprised at what you've been living with and more than a little pleased you did it.

 Tires General
1
newsgroup alt.motorcycle.sportbike See "An Expert's View - Street Compound vs Race Compound" posted by Erik Astrup, December 24 1999 and "More expert tire information!!" also posted by Erik Astrup, December 29 1999
[There should be some way to hotlink a browser to a newsgroup, but I don't know what it is - Mike.]

 A question for you tire experts out there:

Has anyone found a tire that offered super sticky traction while leaned over and hard on the gas combined with good stability during 150 mph WFO straight-line runs?

Personally, I cannot find a tire that offers both. The stock D207ZR's were super stable at straight-line high speeds but tended to let go while leaned over and hard on the gas. 207GP's stick like freakin' glue 100% of the time but unless they are brand new, I get bad front end shake at 140-150mph while WFO. Michelin Race tires were super stabile at high speed but were dangerous on the street because they would never warm up to proper operating temps and would slide like crazy.

How about it guys? Has anyone found a tire that sticks as well as a 207GP but is as stabile as a 207ZR at WFO high speeds? I fear there is no such thing. I've been sticking with the 207GP's lately as an insurance policy against sliding and high-sides but got really pissed off last weekend when I had to keep letting out at 140 during WFO straight-line blasts because the front end was shaking too hard(the Ohlins didn't help). Greg Crowe

You may not need a better tire, there are other factors that make the R1 unstable at speed. These are frame geometry and frame strengh. Lets look it what you already found out, the Michelins are more stable at speed than the 207 race tires, I believe this is because the front tire (Michelin) is taller and the rear tire is shorter. This gives the bike increased stability and requires more effort or input to turn the bike. What you have done is increased trail. Yamaha built the R1 with very little trail, on the street this makes a very quick turning bike, at speed it is an unstable bike prone to wobble. (Hence most R1 owners install a steering damper)Your cure is to increase the trail. This can be done a number of ways. the two most common are to replace the triple trees with ones with less offset, this increases trail, the second is to install a bearing insert in the steering head to increase rake and trail, or both. If this makes sense to you and you want to know more let me know and I will rant and rave some more. Dan Kyle

Dan is entirely right in what he says. There is also another factor. Race tyres are thinner and softer, more flexible, to get a better contact patch and more grip. That means they get more distortion in the carcass as a result of the same input forces. That means they have less stability. Road tyres are built to enhance stability. Road tyres have thicker tread and carcasses so they're stiffer. Having more rubber, they generate more heat and can go off more easily. They are also (and boy has this changed since I started riding!) frequently an even softer compound than many race tyres so they can get some heat into them quickly on a cold day. That softer compound is treated with additives to (a) improve wear and (b) grip well up to a point and then let go progressively. Many race tyres are made to hang on like shit to a blanket and when they finally do let go, they really let go. Last but not least, as road tyres are thicker, they're heavier - by quite a margin. That means they have stronger gyroscopic forces. That can be enough to counter a tendency to go the shopping trolley, allowing a bike that's a bit borderline to run straight.

I think Greg's right. It's all a lucky-dip of compromises. You can't have your cake and eat it too. The best you can do is be well informed and make a decision that reflects what you actually need in a tyre. There are a lot of people riding on D207R-GPs that would have a much better experience with the plain old D207. Miket

I thought it was the other way around. There's just been a discussion at the alt.motorcycle.sportbikes ng, with information passed on from Dunlop. Interesting information. Furthermore, Michelin claims that their race tyres have much stiffer carcasses than their road going tires, to cope with the heavy side load from track use. This, and the way the carcass is built, is the reason for the less stability of the race tires...

Mike note: You may wish to respond to the above. . .

ummmmm, I'd hesitate to argue with Dunlop and Michelin, those guys probably know something about tyres. The way I understand it, road tyres are made with a fairly stiff base or tread area, and fairly soft sidewalls. Race tyres are made with a fairly soft base and very stiff sidewalls. My comments were a generalization - if you delve into the specifics, all bets are off. There are differences in the design and construction techniques between road and race tyres. Exactly what those differences are and what that implies in use is a good subject for a Masters Thesis - it's beyond anything I'd try to put on the forum and way over my head.

I can't see how a stiffer carcass - alone - would diminish stability. The only correlation I can see there is that a stiffer carcass may result in a smaller contact patch at the same pressure, leading to less resistance to changes in direction, and that's a pretty tenuous relationship. I think the difference is in the way the carcass is designed and built - such that the race tyre is less stable DESPITE the fact that it has a stiffer carcass. That's just my opinion. There's also the possibility that the exact physical characteristics and properties I'm thinking of when I say "stiffer" are a little different the ones the tyre makers have in mind. I don't know. Miket.

Punctures, Patches
1
The best (safest) repair to a tire, especially one you're betting a life on, would be the patch/plug combo. May be refered to as a mushroom plug, as its' profile sort of resembles a mushroom. This is a plug that has to be inserted from the inside of the tire, and pulled through from the outside. You have to dismount the tire for this, because the head of the plug is actually a patch. You need to do the proper surface prep for the patch so it will stick. What you end up with is a plug that cannot be pulled out of the tire, or spit out under high centrifical force (high speeds). Plus, it should never leak, even if you wear the tire down to the cord. The potential problem with just plugging a motorcycle tire is that the carcass is not very thick, and as the tread wears down you don't have much cross section material to stabilize the plug. Also, a motorcycle tire flexes its' carcass more than a car tire does, and this may contribute to a simple plug loosing its' adhesion to the tire.

 Tire Dealers/Discount Tire Dealers
1
Tires Unlimited : tiresunlimited@worldnet.att.net

2
Best place to buy tires: A the race track. Talk to one of the teams/team members. Best prices and they normally include mounting and balancing.

 3
Parts Depot 1-800-245-3101
 
 

Wheels
1
Marchisini magnesium wheels. The difference in quality of the casting is clear, front wheel seemed 3 lbs. lighter than stock; rear wheel was more like 5 lbs. lighter

 2
Marchesini wheels are available form TAW Vehicle concepts in Colorado, $1600-$1700 dep. on racer/non-racer price. They quote $140 for the cush drive etc. Most common colors are gold or white, but these rims are light and better made than Marvics.

 3
Rear wheel/stock:12.2 lbs without cush-drive
Front marchesini without discs: 6.9 lbs
Marchesini: 8.4 lbs without cush-drive
Front stock: ???

 4
The stock R1 cush drive with bearings & studs weighs 21 ounces.

 5
Dymag carbon fiber rear weighs 7.1 lbs with cushdrive & sprocket installed. Dymag carbon fiber front wheel weighs 4.2 lbs.

 6
Stock front rim w/o discs, is 8.25 lbs.

 7
D. Thompson & Son located in Lithonia GA, 770-484-6360.
A recommended chroming shop. Experienced with motorcycles and gives a 2 year warranty.

 Alignment
1
I talked to the guys at GMD Computrack.
They recommend using a string to sight down the wheels. The only thing that matters is that the front wheel is straight with the back. To do this, remove everything that will get in the way - lower fairings, exhausts etc.
Wrap a string around the back of the lower [part of the rear] wheel and pull it tight to the front of the bike. Use something heavy to hold the string tight and off the ground. I used old motorcycle batteries.The string should be straight from the back edge of the back tyre to just touching the front edge of the back tyre, and passing the front tyre without bending. Next, measure the distance between the front and back sidewalls of the front tyre on both sides of the front tyre. They should be equal. If they're not, adjust the back tyre side by side until they are right. Make sure the axle nut is not too loose. When you are done, you don't want the axle to move when you retighten it. This method took me forever to do, but they work with factory factory Yamahas and Hondas so it must work. I've seen the Rohms and others but it's the same thing - a string is just cheaper than a pair of 8 foot straight edges. Also easier to take to the track.

I have seen in a British magazine, an ad for a system that uses lasers to sight down the wheels. Whatever - just remember, you don't need to do it every time you change your tyre, but you will need to do it every time you change your gearing.
[I would dispute that. It should be checked every time you loosen the axle nut. If you're lazy like me, you might do it every second or third time, just count the flats on the adjustment bolts for the others, but it really should be done every time. - Mike]

For rear wheel alignment:
1
rohm alignment tool works best for me.it aligns axle with swing arm pivot. 2
Get down behind the bike, and sight down the top of the chain, just like you would if aiming a rifle. If it is not properly aligned, you will easily be able to see an angle or bend in the chain.

 3
I just went to the local hardware store and picked up a 1/8" x 1" x 6' piece of aluminum flat. Put the bike on swingarm stand, put the alum against both edges of the rear tire. See if the clearance on both sides of the front are the same. (with the front straight of course) Real easy to tell, without a tape even. Found out on my 900rr that by going by the marks. When laid out like this there was a 1" difference, with the rear tire pointing left.

 4
Unless the rear axle is in line with the front axle, and the swing arm pivot, it is not in line. There are many alignments to be considered that effect the handling of your bike, not just the rear axle with the chain and swing arm pivot. Front and rear and in between must align harmoniously. BTW the marks and or the axle adjust points are not ever a for sure alignment even with calipers however most of the time they are close enough for govt. work.

 Formum Members Comments on Tires
1
Tires:

  1. Another good option is the Pirelli EVO, or EVO Corsa, which have good grip, although not as good as the Pilot Sport, but offer excellent stability and turn in characteristics. They suck in the wet compared to the Michelins though.
  2. BT56SS: I've never tried them, but they are supposed to work very well on the R1.
  3. On the street, I feel perfectly confident with the Pilot Sport, but for trackdays next year, I'll get a set of the Pilot Races.
  4. There are two kinds of Pilots the "Race"and the "Race Soft", get the "Race". From what I have read and been told from the people that have used both the "Race Soft" is more like qualifying tire and will not last.
  5. The Bridgestone BT57 or BT56 are more than adequate in supplying grip and mileage for the street.
  6. I now use a Dragon Corsa front (old tyre from the CBR600) and a BT56 rear on my 9 and I'm very happy about it.
  7. Pilot Race are perfectly stable. Yep, not necessary for the street, but I want all the grip available for the track. Makes me feel better at my limits, and provides a cushion to my learning curve. The Pilot Sports will go on for the street.
2 3
Try the Dunlop D207GP instead of the D207 ZR. These tires are for racing and have the best grip that I have experienced. They are also very stable in turns and predictable when they slide. They steer very presicely, and give a lot of confidence in the twisties. They are a tad less "stable" in top speed, but I have never experienced any trouble.

 Brakes
1
Lots of recommendations for Harris brake lines for the R1.

2
Motor Accessory Warehouse has a great price on the Goodridge brake lines.

 3
Good prices on Goodridge brake lines.
http://www.motodepot.com

4
Brake bleeders:
Part No for R1 is SB8125 or SB8125L (long nipple)
630-739-4620
630-739-9626 fax
Speed Bleeder Products
P.O. Box 306

Lemont, IL 60439
Cost $6.50 each plus shipping
http://speedbleeder.com
email to speedbleeder@ameritech.net
The 8 x 1.25 speedbleeder best fits the R1

 5
Thumb operated rear-brake: cost is about $1000 Canadian for the brake lever/master cylinder only. You need an additional caliper for the rear brake, as well as a new caliper hanger to hold BOTH rear calipers that you will now be running; you cannot run with two master cylinders actuating the same caliper.
tel# is:JAYS RACING@ (01543) 277998 (in Canada)

 6
All the local racers here use Dunlopads or EBC HH Sintered pads. I have tried both pads on my R1s, both for street riding and the track, I can honestly say these pads are awesome. Either one would be an excellent choice.

 I think the EBC pads are maybe a little more progressive than the Dunlopads, but the Dunlopads require less effort to slow down. In a racing publication they did a comparison of all the different brake pads on a dyno. They measured torque produced by the pads at a constant amount of effort. The EBC Sintered Street and EBC Sintered Race came out best.

 I, however, am now using Dunlopads. In my opinion, they are better than the EBCs in stopping friction.

7
To clean brake discs, use steel wool (very fine grade) or a scotchbrite pad. DO NOT use WD-40. The only thing you should ever be spraying on your discs is brake disc cleaner.
[For god sake don't get chain lube anywhere near a disk. You can also use emery paper or cloth - sandpaper - just about anything that's not oil based or lubricating. Acetone (nail polish remover) can be used to wash lubricants off a disk. Some other kinds of solvents as well, but not all solvents. - Mike]

 8
You can't go wrong with either Motul or AP Racing brake fluid. The Motul is really good, because they go to the trouble to pack the container with nitrogen, ensuring that no condensation will contaminate the fluid before the container is opened. Braided steel lines will make a definite improvement in the feel.

 9
I recommend either Goodrich for ready made lines, or custom made for your application utilizing Earls components.

 10
The best brake setup that we have tried so far is Dunlopad race pads with Fastline hoses (up front) it borders on dangerous until you get used to it. I like Fastline hoses because they fit in the original holders perfectly. Six piston YZF750 calipers will bolt on directly but require slightly longer hoses. I have not tried the YZF calipers on the road but I did bolt them on.
Ivan

 11
Galfer brake products
5788 Dawson Ave
Goleta, CA 93117-3717
800-685-6633       805-967-2726
Tim Oakins      galfer@silcom.com
http://www.silcom.com/galfer

12
The thread pitch for the Yamaha master cylinder is 1.25. You can get air free bleeder bolts from Yoshimura, or Street N Competition.

 13
http://www.1800fastlap.com       Fastline steel braided brake lines.

14
The prices for LP Goodridge lines (#408-2173) are $117.95. Those are Kevlar fronts. As Dave J pointed out, the -2's do NOT come in Kevlar, by Goodridge. Now, part #408-3850 are for the -2 SS lines, and LP quotes them at $194.95 for the front, and (#408-3850R) $94.95 for the rears. The salesperson didn't say that I couldn't get the kevlar -2's, so that's what I thought I was quoted.

 15
Just got the EBC HH pads and had my brakes bled yesterday. AMazing difference, even with the stock lines. Could have been the bleeding. "-2" Goodrich steel braided lines have a smaller internal diameter and provide an excellent, firm feel.

 16
Don't use DOT 5 in your bike's lines - maybe nice for autos, not so for bikes.

 17
I use M600. You will have no problems, but you will be doing yourself a favor to bleed the brakes until the old fluid is gone. This alone helped the quality of my brakes feel a great deal better.

 18
I put in the EBC HH sintered (sp?) pads and the brakes are MUCH better now!

 19
I`m using CARBONNE LORAINNE new SBK-3 pads front and rear since last week...rear is too powerfull now, but I can accomodate; front is different from before; initial bite is not as strong as the stockers, but once heated up, bite is much stronger and predictable. Overall, I think they are great pads,and that I can modulate my brakes better in a safer way.

 20
Go with Goodridge -2 lines and EBC HH sintered pads,...seriously,..cant go wrong!!

 Just a little FYI,

 I had been debating for a while about having the rear master cylinder stripped & powdercoated, and I am glad that I decided to do it. When I disassembled the rear master cylinder, I found sediment in the cylinder bore, and on the backside of the piston. This, with only 598 miles on the bike. It makes me wonder how many others have this condition, also. I would hope that many of you give some serious thought to doing a brake system overhaul this winter. The rebuild kits for the Front & rear master cylinder are not expensive, and you can rest easy in the knowledge that your brakes are "Up to snuff".

For your own sake, give it some thought.
Santo Jannotti

 21
Speedbleeders: I'll never be without them again. They work great. If you have a dry system, you will need a Mighty Vac to get things going, but after that it is a breeze. Don't forget to get a bleeder bolt for your master cylinder. I paid $15.00 for mine from Galfer. Also, don't forget the hidden bleeder in the rear. You'll need 4 altogether.

 22
After the Mity Vac and usual bleeding, unbolt the calipers and let them hang down overnight. Tie a piece of string on them to take the weight off the lines. Zip tie the lever to the bar also. Then bolt them up and bleed one more time. This procedure made for a very firm lever feel.

 23
Don't forget to put something between the pads when you clamp the brake handle, so you don't have to pry the pucks apart.

 24
Brake Fluid: Use DOT 5.1. DOT 5.1 is NOT an improved 5.0 but a improved 4.0. DOT 5.0 can cause swelling of rubbers and because it doesn't absorb water, the water forms droplets in the brake fluid. When heated up the droplets turn into gas, taking up the brake pressure. DOT 5.1 does eat paint and is hydroscopic. DOT 5.1 has a higher boiling point.

John

 25
After warping/chewing some rotors, they came up with 2 new HH compounds that are supposedly much less likely to damage rotors (for a total of 3 compounds at one time). Now There's the standard HH and the "Kit" HH's. Either is supposed to be fine for OEM stainless rotors, but the "Kit" is not recommended for cast iron and other softer rotors. Just to be safe, I'm gonna buy the "standard" HH's, not the "Kit" HH's.

 26
I just installed some SS -2, what a difference they made, nice tight feel. The reaction from lever or pedal movement is superb. I tried the Mityvac II ($23.00 @ Autozone) It didn't work that good, It may be good for the initial bleeding but not for removing all of the air in the system. The "one man bleeder kit" ($5.00) worked just fine. Definitely go with the SS lines and fittings you cant loose.

 27
Gary Gallagher of ebc brakes technical and racing dept.
(425) 486-1244 and (425) 485-7610

 28
http://www.ebc-brakes.com       EBC brakes website

 Sprockets, Chains, Cush Drives
1
Hub/sprocket carrier: Part # (#4xv-25366-00-00) is $62.22

 2
Billet aluminum rear hub: JT Motorsports 800-276-8247
(1-800-crotch-rocket)

 3
The old (bad) sprocket carrier is part #4XV253600 whereas the replacement (good) is 4XV25360 R1. Also if you take yours out the bad ones have TUSHIMA YES stamped on them but the replacement ones don't.

 4
White Lightning Chain Lube
I clean my chain with WD-40 really good, as previously mentioned, then I go ride the bike until it is physically warm to the touch (not just around the block). Then I spray a thick coating of chainwax on it and let it dry for a half hour. For me, this lasts between oil changes (3-4k miles). My last chain had 21k miles on it when I traded in the bike and no signs of needing a new one.

 5
Pro-Tek Sprockets, Inc.
5138-R West Hurley Pond Road
Farmingdale, New Jersey USA 07727
Tel. 732.938.6444
E-mail    protek@protekk.com
Fax 732.938.6510

 6
1998 R1 owners: Look VERY VERY CLOSLEY at your cush drive and you may see the cracks develop before it fails. Use a magnifying glass if you have to.

 7
The only problem with the cush drive, is that Yamaha in their quest for saving weight, made the drive dogs hollow, instead of solid. The JT motorsports cush drive has solid dogs.

 8
Performance Machines makes a cush drive for their spun wheels to save your transmission and sprocket bolts. $295
http://www.performance-machine.com

The JT cush drive is not non-flexible, you still use the stock rubber pieces with it. Just the drive dogs are solid instead of hollow. The operation is the same as the stock piece. 4XV-25366-00-00 - The original 98 cush drive - Yamaha part number 4XV-25360-R1-00 Is the replacement "kit" that has the updated cush drive, studs, nuts, and rear wheel bearing already installed. 4XV-25366-10-00 - The new updated or '99 cush drive itself without the other stuff.

 There is only 1 difference between the original '98 cush drive and the updated version. There are 6 "ears" that stick out of the cush drive hub itself that go between the rubber pieces in the rear wheel. Those "ears" are completely hollow on the original version. The updated version has about 1/2 the ears volume filled in with metal.

 9
They now offer a gold chain from EK with over 10K tensile strength

 10
Phone number to call the National Highway Transportation Safety Agency In case of rear hub failure: 888-DASH-2-DOT
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/oscripts/IVOQ/VOQ/voq1.cfm
http://www.nhsta.dot.gov

 11
Performance Machines makes a cush drive for their spun wheels to save your tranmission and sprocket bolts. $295
http://www.performance-machine.com
Yamaha part number 4XV-25360-R1-00 Is the replacement "kit" that has the updated cush drive, studs, nuts, and rear wheel bearing already installed.

 12
I use a DID ERV2 chain. I have used Regina also very good. I would stretch everthing else in a few races.

 13
Just a quick word of advice. Do not use a clip style master link. Make sure you use the rivet type!

 14
Renthal sprockets have the best wear life of any I have ever seen.

 15
Renthal sprockets
For Renthal Front Sprocket (Stock 16 tooth) For Renthal Rear Sprocket (Stock 43 tooth
Made out of Nickel-Chrome-Mloybdenum steel, case hardened. Hard anodised 7075 aluminium alloy.
Part # 309U-530-16P Part # 210U-530-43P-HA

Modification Suggestions

Forum members suggested modification priorities

 1
Go for a damper first, steel brake lines second, and a penske or ohlins shock third. brake or hp upgrades aren't necessary on the r1 to me (yet).

Racing Modifications
1

2
"Trade Secrets" from Cycle Improvements, Waterloo, Ontario
  1. When replacing brake pads the proper procedure should be followed. After removing the caliper, but before removing the pads pump the brake lever or pedal to push the caliper pistons out further that they were. Then take some scotchbrite and contact cleaner and clean the pistons of all road grime and corrosion. This will ensure that when you push the caliper pistons back, the corrosion won't be pushed back in the caliper bore possibly causing the caliper pistons to stick or the seals to prematurely fail.
  2. It is important to check your tire pressure on a regular basis. If you are not sure what pressure to set them at you can do the following. Start with the tire pressure recommended in your owners manual when they are completely cold and then recheck after driving at your normal pace. After about 25 to 30 kilometers you should see approximately a 10% rise in pressure. If you see more of an increase raise the pressure by 2 to 3 psi and re check. This will cause the tire carcass to flex less creating less heat. If you see less of an increase then 10%, lower the pressure by 2 to 3 psi and recheck.
  3. The key to a long chain life is maintenance. Keeping your chain adjusted to the proper tension is essential and will not only lengthen the life of your chain, but also make riding safer and more enjoyable. The best way to check your chain tension is to compress the rear suspension so that the front sprocket, swingarm pivot, and rear axle are all in line. This is the point where your chain is at its tightest. Adjust to 3/8" travel each way making sure that you check it in a few different spots as many chains wear unevenly.
  4. The first step is to support the rear wheel in air, then break the chain. Use half of the master link and attach the new chain temporarily, then pull the old chain around the front sprocket. This will pull the new chain through and eliminate the need to pull the countershaft sprocket cover off. When installing the master link make sure that the closed end points in the direction of travel. Clean the slide plate and clip with contact cleaner, then smear a light film of high strength adhesive such as automotive goop over it. This will make your clip type master link as good as the original rivet type.
General Performance
1
I changed the rear sprocket for a bigger one ( 2 teeth more, aluminium from Afam) and would recommend that move to everyone, it make the bike rock even more without losing any top speed!

Carburation/Needles/Etc.
1
Shimming the needles will give the most benefit in the midrange, with somewhat diminishing returns higher up in the powerband. What happens is, the end of the needle is tapered, so by shimming it up slightly, the fuel is allowed to start coming out of the needle jet "sooner" for a given throttle position.

2
Print you an " all gear " run? That should tell you if your jetting is correct. The runs should match up if jetting is correct. If the all gear is higher that the roll on, you are too rich, and vice-versa. Also look at the shape of the all gear runs, they should be flat at the top. If they are not which way do they lean? More power at the beginning of each gear would indicate that your too rich in the mid, because your slides open faster than the fuel can be sucked through the emulsion tubes and there by supply fuel. Vice-versa is also true in this case.

3
I like changing the main jets MUCH better than shimming the needles. As someone said, shimming the needles doesn't give a linear change throughout the rpm range. I don't know what a set of Mikuni 132.5 main jets would do with the slip-on but I'd bet they would be as good or better than the shims I used with the stock needles.

Cranks
1
Falicon Crankshaft Components
115 Old Coachman road
Clearwater, Florida 34625
(727) 797-2468
web http://www.faliconcranks.com
E-Mail info@falicon.com
Price is $400.00 (I think this refers to trueing and welding)

Clutch, Transmission
1
Aluminum clutch plates offer a weight savings of one pound off the rotating weight of your engine, compared to steel plates. Cryogenically treated to be stronger than the stock items.
Street & Competition
1175 Hoosick road
Troy, NY 12180
(800) 236-5487
price is $100.00

2
Cryogenically treated clutch plates. They are about 1 lb. lighter than the stock steels. You can order them from Street N Competition. 800-326-5487.
The cryoplates are lighter and stronger than the stock steel plates, and they DO make a noticeable difference in the acceleration. They retail for about $108.00 a set, and I would recommend them to anyone who is in the market for clutch components.

3
I think they work better than steel, aluminum dissipitates heat easier than steel. The cryogenic treatment also makes them structurally stronger than steel, also.

4
They are manufactured by more than one company, mine were originally manufactured by Cryolabs. I got them through Street N Competition. 1-800-326-5487.

5
If your clutch hub or basket or both have notched wear, the clutch plates won't separate quickly enough and cause rough shifting. I just replaced my clutch; new frictions, metals, and hub because it was beginning to have notches where the metal plates contact it. The bike shifts noticeably better than before.

6
DO NOT use any other metal clutch drive plates other than stock Yamaha, they WILL notch your clutch hub. Its not the basket, its the HUB, the part that the metal plates engage/slide on, the part lists for less than $100, the engagement teeth on [some aftermarket clutches with names we won't mention - Mike.] whose metal plates are not as wide as OEM metal plates which allows them to rock back and forth more, thus causing them to dig into the clutch hub much sooner than the OEM metal plates would, this would cause more noise and "notchy" shifting. Ivan

7
My bike is pretty rough going into second also. I think this winter, I'll pull it apart and shim up the gaps. This is a common problem with production bikes and production tollerences. This why some do it and some are ok. I've been using Mobil 1 10-40 motorcycle oil, but I'm switching to the 20-50. I think this will help keep the shafts rotating at more similar speeds and cushion the dogs a little more.

8
Fast by Gast is one of the top three places in the country to get your gears undercut.

9
Sorry if this creates any confusion here but there is a bit of a problem in the theory side of this clutch operation. Whilst the clutch is operated this conical spring in the damper unit forces the steel plate away from the fiber plate and releases any drive effort from it. In effect when this occurs drive is nonexistent through the unit. At this time when the clutch lever is operated the steel plate is now against the piano wire circlip. When you release the clutch, it is not until the clutch spring pressure overrides the conical spring pressure in the damper unit that actual clutch engagement occurs. In effect, this means that the unit is NOT in contact all the time, it is only in contact when the clutch lever is released. To add to this, the damper pack is actually the final decider as to when complete lockup of the clutch unit occurs. As in until described clutch spring overrides conical spring pressure they are acting against each other. Hope this clears things a bit, have seen from the posts that some people are thinking this is creating problems that it is not due to the theory here being misunderstood. I stress if this circlip is fitted correctly it cannot come out. I have even tried to pull it out with pliers and unless you bend the ends as in force it to the point of damage it cannot be pulled out. Can supply a diagram if it would help. But stress it must be fitted correctly.

To sum up in layman's terms this damper pack is not working until clutch is released and decides the final point of clutch engagement.

A note to add there is no CONSTANT Drag. When clutch is released then damper unitcomes into play, when clutch is applied you could take special friction plate, conical spring and spring seat out and throw them away and no difference would be found. But when you released clutch first steel plate of clutch pack would only release as far as the piano wire circlip and would not allow pressure to be applied to friction plates against face of clutch boss. This would result in no drive. Stress again, this unit will not create constant drag in neutral or clutch in position nor increase clutch wear or engine heat. Will also have no effect on finding neutral. I cannot stress enough that the only time this unit comes into effect is at the final stages of clutch lockup point, at any other time this unit is in effect free wheeling.

Remove enough plastic to expose the full clutch cover. At the clutch hand lever wind the adjuster right in and remove the cable (to give enough slack.) Remove the cable from the lever at the bottom of the clutch cover - make a mental note of the rough angle of the lever to the case for later. Remove the 8 bolts holding the clutch cover on (maybe an idea to slightly slacken them ion opposite sides at bit at a time to stop warping) (no need to drain if the bike has been stood on its side stand for an hour or two.) Pull the cover off - this will probably need the lever wriggling a bit. Remove the bolts holding the clutch spring (like to the cover, slacken them off a bit first.) Remove the spring followed by the metal plates and friction plates. Lay them in order so that you can put them back in the same order and with the same sides touching. When you get near the back, with one or two plates left, you will (hopefully) not be able to get them out because of the piano wire around the inner hub holding them in place. Gently prize the ends out and remove the wire. Reassemble as above. Theory says you should replace the gasket for the cover. The fiddly bit is engaging the screw gear in the cover with the 'hole' in the clutch. This takes a little patience. Check the lever ends up in the same place as before (you did make a mental note?) If not, you are one or two teeth out and will have to pull the cover and tweak it. Torque for clutch spring bolts is 5.8 foot-pounds. Torque for the cover bolts is 8.7 foot-pounds. (Tighten a bit at a time in diagonals.)

10
For a different view from the above, and a recommended method of eliminating the piano wire circlip altogether (a number of engines have apparently "grenaded" because of it, see below:

a
http://www.firststreetinternet.com/~santoj/index.htm
Santo's site with very detailed clutch modification information.
b
The only thing I can add (to Santo's clutch fix explanation above) is to remove the plastic oil filler cap at the top of the clutch housing when re-installing.
c
Use a flash light to look into that hole to align the push rod with the hole in the housing... makes the job much easier.
d
Another clutch housing reinstallation trick is to put some grease on the back side of the pushrod to help hold it in place as you slide the housing back on. Otherwise, it topples and flops around and is hard to line up. You'll know you have it right if the marks on the housing and on the clutch lever arm line up once the housing is fully in place.
11
Clutch replacement: Your existing steels should be checked with a feeler gauge, on a plate of glass for flatness, and replaced if not perfectly flat, or if they exhibit ANY blue or black discoloration. As for soaking, the steel plates do not need to be pre-soaked in oil, but if you are smart, you will soak new fiber plates in clean, fresh oil for at least an hour. You can do the plate removal with the clutch basket still in the bike.
SantoJ

 12
Dont forget to buy a new clutch gasket...

Radiator, Cooling
1
To Remove the thermostat or not?
[That is the question
Whether 'tis nobler of mine
to suffer the slings and arrows
of outrageous transmission design,
or to take up pliers against a piece of piano wire
and by removing, end them.
Oops - cooling system. Sorry - Mike

Well suffice it to say that racebikes their respective requirements are very different from our reality. Try not to be to terribly influenced by what they do for this topic anyway.

Racebikes operate under the assumption that there engines are always at redline or on their way their so they rely on a certain amount of stasis. The works radiators are designed to cope with the amount of heat the engine will produce at race pace, which is mostly constant, in addition to certain ambient temperature expectations. They modulate temperature by taping off sections of their radiators to keep temp up when they race in very cool conditions or rain (water is a better medium for conduction than air). For example, if you saw the WSB race at the A1 ring where Chili was in the lead, toward the end of the race, the tape on his radiator worked loose and you could see it flapping out the sides of his Suzuki.

In our case, our cooling system has to operate over a range of ambient conditions and engine speeds, not a steady state. So temp has to be partially regulated thru a thermostat.

I agree with Santo about the idea of clearances as well, and that it is not good for the motor to run to cool. Keep in mind also that oil viscosity and jetting are temperature dependant as well.

With regard to thermostats and what they do, they are not just full open or closed. This is a simple matter of physics. The spring (actually a combination of particular metal on a shaft that is springloaded, but I'm gonna use spring because its easier) expands and contracts with temperature so it runs through a "range" after hits the minimum temperature to effect change. So in that respect, it is not like a circuit that is either open or closed, but its range is very small. There is a plate that moves of the base that lets water flow thru. As such, the size of the opening will change and effect flow in conjunction with impeller speed at the waterpump.

Initially it is heated from one side (engine side)on startup. This allow coolant to get hotter than standard operating temp until it get the spring to its set temp to lift off(explaing why opening temp is hotter than what you see during normal operation). It lifts to full open and then lets cooler water from the radiator flow to the engine. It generally will then close down a bit provide minor modulation based on temperature after that. What we see on our guages is a function of where the temp sending unit is, so it may not tell you exactly what you want to know depending on the system design.
Harpee

Electric/Air Shifters, Shift Lights
1
http://www.gofastperformance.com/
Tank risers, electric shifters, etc.

2
The most common is the Dale Walker Holeshot PowerShifter 2.

3
Most just "sense", in one way or another, that you have started to move the shift lever (with your foot) to upshift to the next gear. As you progress though the upshift (w/o the clutch), the ignition is halted very briefly to reduce the load on the tranny, and you are able to complete the shift w/o the clutch. Spend a little more money, and you can have one that moves the shift lever for you (via push button or whatever) - IMHO, a waste of extra $$ for the street. I rode an R1 with a power shifter - was on a nasty bumpy road - just bang-bang-bang through the gears, kinda like you're shifting an automatic tranny like it was a manual one (if that makes sense). I felt more in control on the rough road - I dunno, less to have to concentrate on - just pin the throttle and move your shift foot.

3
electronic shifter/shift-light
http://www.techtronics.co.uk

4
A typical 'air shifter' like the one marketed by MRE, consists of a small, cylindrical tank to hold air (at 125 psi), a mechanical pushbutton switch to mount on the handlebars, a mechanical "foot" to do the actual shifting, and an air actuated solenoid to clip the coils.

When the rider presses the handlebar button, line pressure air travels to the solenoid, causing it to open a port, which allows the air to travel to the mechanical "foot". The foot is a bracket mounted cylinder with a shaft coming out of it, with a clevis on the shaft end. This is mounted to the shift lever, and the other end is mounted to the frame mounting bracket, which allows the foot to move / pivot in a similar way to a steering damper. At the same time that the solenoid sends air to the foot, it also has a pressure activated electrical switch mounted to it, whose purpose is to interrupt the electricity going to the coils. This has the effect of unloading the transmission, which can then be shifted into the next gear quickly and easily. This type of setup allows you to do full-throttle up-shifts simply by pushing a button. The downside is in the fabrication of the requisite brackets, and like nitrous, the air supply will be less each time you shift unless you spring for an onboard air compressor. Or you could use one of the newer nitrogen shifter that operate at 950 psi, and will give 1,500 or so shifts before the bottle needs to be refilled.

5
To convert an air over electric shifter to an automatic shifter all you have to do is buy a multi use rev limiter. Dyna has one. It has an output called "Shift minder" that will send an electrical signal to the solenoid and the coils, shifting the transmission when the RPM reaches the selected limit. So (for the non-technically inclined guys here) when the shift light comes on, it shifts.

6
The R1 that I rode just shifted like butter with the Dale Walker Holeshot Powershifter - like maually running an automatic tranny through the gears as if it were a manual transmission. made it much easier to focus ahead. Generally the guy just uses it for upshifting at WOT.

7
http://www.yzf-r1-forum.com:8080/upload/spatacho1.gif
Data logging tach, shift light, etc.

8
patw@rivayamaha.com
Check with Pat via e-mail for info on a shifter made by John France that he recommends.

Anti-Theft
1
For a good bike theft warning system: Buy a baby monitor and put it in your trunk.
RadioShack, Walmart, K-Mart

Lighting, Signal Flasher mods
1
nobody has answered his question - here, go and get a hopkins taillight converter, start clipping, soldering and heat shrinking. took me about 30 mins and they work great. And I am horrible with wiring. picture shows a different converter type (I used the hopkins , $19 cdn), same installation pretty much. Or here is what I did, I followed this fellows instructions "Tridon (brand name) EL12-C Heavy Duty Flasher

Hopkins Manufacturing Corp taillight converter: important features here:
1. Four wires in: a) right turn, b) left turn, c) brake, d) tail light
2. Three wires out: a) right turn/brake, b) left turn/brake, c) tail light."
I dont know if you really need the heavy duty flasher. I dont have one.

2
http://www.braincell.com/bob/my_r1/mig_pipe/
Here's a link to Bob Larson's web page where he spells out the tail light conversion and gives some schematics and part numbers. It helped me when I did my conversion. It really is very simple and doesn't require much time at all. If you don't use a different flasher, the turn signal will flash double time when the brake light is on simultaneously. It didn't cause any other problems and I replaced it simply because it annoyed me.

3
The actual part # for the Tridon flasher is EL12-C. I picked one up at Pep-Boys for around $8 and some change.

4
Heavy duty blinker need to wire turn signals into brake light system. Tridon [brand-name] EL12-C. Heavy duty flasher - Hopkins Manufacturing Corp taillight converter. Important features here:
4 wires in - a) right turn - b) left turn - c) brake - d) taillight.
3 wires out - a) right tun / brake - b) left turn / brake - c) taillight.

5
Here are the accessories you need: Hoppy wiring accessories taillight converter #48845 (for vehicles with independent turn signals) Or a: Calterm taillight converter # 08081

6
Wiring diagram for the above: http://www.braincell.com/bob/my_r1/mig_pipe/

7
To install a Tridon flasher unit: Take off the seat and look on the rear right corner of the under seat area. This is where you will find the flasher attached to the undertray via a rubber mount. It will have a 2 wire connector running to it. Disconnect it and remove the flasher unit. For my install I chose not to cut any wires , but instead to make a new jumper set. This requires two small sections of wire and four spade connectors, 2 male and 2 female. The female connectors can be attached as they are, but the male ends may need to be trimmed to fit in the stock plug. I just took mine to the bench grinder and made them fit. Next you attach the male connectors. Now you can plug the jumper right into the stock plug and to the new flasher. The wires don't seem to have to be plugged into the stock harness in any particular way so its almost foolproof. Just attach the flasher back to the rubber mount on the side with a zip tie and you're done.

8
http://www.rmhid.com/
Xenon lights for motorcycles. Some Forum members have recommended against these. They are way expensive and under some [many] conditions they would perform less well than the standard units.

[And after some digging and searching and a request to KJ - the original author - here are the facts. All of them. - Mike]

9
I have researched this topic for a couple of years. I must say, ever since I saw and driven a BMW 740iL with these High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps I wanted one. Although they looked good from the outside, as a driver something was weird about them. It took some getting used to to drive the car in the dark. I have posted on this forum about this since it has been a subject of debate not only here, but on many automobile forums as well. (Alvaro, feel free to jump in since we know you work for Hella Spain).
You may want to check out these facts before forking out $1k for the kit:

Don't even get me started on those blue filtered halogen lights (blue ion, etc. Do a search on "HID" in this forum and see my posts on October 28 and 29, 1998). But, if we are talking about true HID lamps, then here are some things you should be aware of:

* ARE THESE CONVERSIONS SAFE AND WELL THOUGHT OUT?

Trying to "convert" halogen head-lamps to HID may be an unsafe thing to do. At this time, there aren't legitimate HID retrofits for the head-lamps of any car or bike which didn't have them as a factory option. HID head-lamps use an arc capsule where an arc or Xenon plasma (most automobile units use Xenon) jumps between two electrodes. Unlike a halogen bulb (which uses a glowing filament) HID's use this arc as the source of the light. It takes thousands of volts to produce this arc, and a conversion kit should have the necessary electronics to provide this voltage supply. Like halogen bulbs, it is important to have the light source at a precise spot (in millimeters) in the reflector for the lamp to produce a proper beam. Also, the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal orientation is of extreme significance to some lamp designs. As we know, twin-beam head-lamps (high and low beams) must have a twin filament bulb. Some designs also shield the low beam. The only way to assure the correct placement of the source in the lamp is to use the correct bulb type. Some of these HID conversions do not take these things into account.

Some of these conversions have a standard bulb base drilled-out and in the filament's place an HID arc capsule is glued. Other designs use an HID arc capsule attached to an adaptor plate which fits in place of the stock bulb. I am not aware of any HID arc capsules that have more than one arc or have a transverse arc path. On the other hand, most sealed beams (and 9004) use transverse filaments.

Some may argue that as a result, if the stock unit has only a single filament, then single arc conversions are just fine. That would be a mistake since the conversion maybe unsafe. The "type" light produced by an HID arc is different from that of the filament in a halogen bulb. The stock reflectors of a halogen head-lamp are optimized for a halogen bulb. This is true even if the arc is placed at precisely the same spot as the stock filament. There is no guarantee that the beam pattern produced by such a conversion may not produce excessive glare to oncoming drivers and back-dazzle to the driver in bad weather. There are also no guarantees that the conversion will illuminate properly the places in the driver's field of vision that really need to be illuminated. There is more to headlight illumination than just brightness and color of the bulb ...

In addition, what is not commonly known is that in an accident, cars with OEM HID units have mechanisms (tied to the SRS systems' sensors) that disconnect the power into the HID voltage supply, thus protecting people from potential shock. This is not true in conversion units. This is another reason why this conversion maybe unsafe.

 * DO HID's OFFER BETTER VISIBILITY?

Believe it or not, there are physiological disadvantages to HID head-lamps that do not exist with halogen lamps. For example, an HID lamp's Color Rendering Index (CRI) is in the 60 to 70 range. On the other hand, halogen head-lamps' CRI is MUCH better (CRI in the high 90's). Higher CRI figures mean that the human eye can perceive color much better in that illuminated environment. Advantage: Halogen lamps!

Why then, do some OEM manufacturers use this technology and boast that the HID lamps produce light that resembles daylight? Although this is true in terms of color temperature, it does not consider all the factors involved in the eye's ability to see in the night. HID's produce light with a color temperature in the range of 4300K as compared with standard halogen's 3200K or high-efficiency halogen's 3800K (Sunlight is at 5250K). It has yet to be proven that light sources with color temperatures resembling daylight do in fact improve the driver's NIGHT vision. The reason being is that the eye behaves differently at night than during the day (or more accurately, it behaves differently when the WHOLE field of vision is equally flooded with a light source as compared with just part of it). The research behind how HID head-lamps impacts driver safety and vision is currently not well known. Interestingly, it has been shown that (given a certain intensity) distance perception can be improved in some cases with headlights producing light with LOWER color temperature. It turns out that for driving in foggy, rainy, or snowy conditions, any shift of the light spectrum towards the blue DECREASES our ability to see well! This is the case with HID lamps. This is one reason why France required the use of selective-yellow head-lamps for so many decades. Research has shown that these lights improve (or at least not reduce) vision performance at night. Mind you that one of the problems with this color is the human's inability to distinguish yellow features from white ones in an environment flooded with this color of light. However a sodium lamp (a type of HID), is much worse than selective-yellow halogen lamps even though their color temperatures are not too different. The reason why is that sodium lamps have very low CRI's. If you have ever been in an environment flooded with a sodium lamp, you may have noticed that you almost see only in black and yellow! Imaging having to ride in that environment! The eye uses color as an important source of information. There is a reason why we have those color receptors (cone receptors) in our retina.

 ARE THERE ANY ADVANTAGES TO USING HID?

Yes, one is that they last a VERY long time. Another is that they are more efficient than filament lamps as a source of light. In Lumens/Watt, HID's rule! a typical 35 Watt HID lamp can produce around 3200 Lm which is 3-5 times what a halogen bulb of equal wattage can produce. That allows for smaller head-lamp designs (for improved aerodynamics), or you can keep the lamp wattage the same, and get "more" light. Of course, by now you know it is not that straightforward! Increasing Lumens this way works for lights like flood-lights, since the objective is to simply "flood" the area with a beam of light. A vehicle head-lamp is MUCH more complex. The objectives behind good head-lamp design is maximizing distance vision while minimizing glare to other drivers. Moreover, it has to illuminate what is essential for safe driving, while not illuminating areas that would reduce from the ability to visualize these essential areas. The objective of maximizing distance vision while reducing glare are contradictory goals in low-beam head-lamp design, and precise tradeoffs are made here. The objective of illuminating what is essential is VERY important. During the day, the field of vision is illuminated fairly uniformly. This is true even during inclement weather, where the differences would be the degree of illumination, not much the uniformity. On the other hand, night vision consists of only what is illuminated in the field of vision. Outside that illumination field, objects are dark and cannot be seen. Here is the twist: This illumination field MOVES with the car (unlike daylight illumination). Also, the boundary of the illumination field and what is dark is in extreme contrast, which creates problems with vision. Such contrasts also occur within the field of illumination, albeit less severely. When the foreground of the field of vision is illuminated very sharply, the eye's pupils constrict, which reduces distance vision. On the other hand, if you have little foreground illumination, a dark zone is created in front of the vehicle, causing difficulty to see what is directly ahead of vehicle. This is what the US has regulated for so long in US spec. vehicles and why increasing light here may give some improvement in night vision.

With HID's producing MUCH more light per Watt, where would this "extra" light be utilized? Perhaps some of it can be put into the high-intensity zone of the beam for distance vision improvement. The problem is that it may increase glare to other drivers and exceed regulations. Another option would be to distribute some of that extra light in the rest of the beam. However, intensity regulations outside the high-intensity zone are very tight since increasing intensity in these areas creates back-dazzle and veiling glare, especially in inclement weather. The only place to utilize the extra light would be in the foreground. This may be useful for US spec headlights as was explained earlier. But HID's have so much more intensity that over a certain level, distance vision is compromised, glare on wet roads is increased, etc.

That still fails to explain why HID's are popular OEM fitments in many luxury cars. Here is one explanation: Somehow driver performance is improved if they can see every detail of the moving road in front of them. This performance enhancement is psychological in nature. The performance enhancement is due possibly to sufficient foreground illumination where peripheral vision would be better trusted to handle the foreground, while the eye is focused in the distance where the driver should be looking. Note that foreground illumination is just one of the many performance objectives of a vehicle's head-lamp. It is sometimes falsely assumed that increased foreground illumination means better performance. Again, this sense of security caused by HID lamps intensely illuminating the foreground is generally false.

I've made this post long enough, but you catch the drift. IMHO, HID conversions are not worth the money. Unless HID technology improves and costs plummet to the ground, when my bulbs burn out in my R1, I will opt for the new high efficiency halogen bulbs that use high-pressure Xenon gas as the inert "blanket" (rather than low pressure Bromine) which offer increased intensity without CRI compromises. These lamps offer up to 20% improvement in thermal efficiency which means that more of the electrical energy goes into producing light rather than heat.

Just my $0.02 :)

KJ

 Fairing Mods, Frame Slider Installation
1
How to cut smooth, correct holes in your fairing for a full sized mushroom.

In order to measure and cut the plastic I used a set of calipers and a hole saw. I first covered the area with masking tape (to keep the plastic from splintering and also to mark the spot to cut) then took the calipers and marked the distance between the fairing bolt and the engine mount bolt (center to center). On your fairing, draw a half circle using a pen and the calipers. Next I took a measurement from one of the lower fairing 1/4 turn holes to the engine mount bolt and made the same half circle mark on the fairing. The two lines should intersect at a point, and that will be the center hole for your hole saw drill bit. I also took another measurement from another lower fairing 1/4 turn hole and made another mark on the fairing just to make sure. All 3 lines should intersect at one point. You can't go wrong. Make sure you go slow with the hole saw and have someone else hold the fairing while you cut it.

2
I like his way of finding the center of the hole but I was nervous about cutting such a large hole in one shot.

What I did was make a round template from plexiglass (could be any other material) and drilled a hole in the center to fit the Intuitive slider mounting bolt and another very small hole at the radius of the slider. I then drilled a small hole in the fairing and installed the bolt with the template into the engine mount. By placing the small drill (radius of slider) into the template I scratched a circle onto the irregular surface of the fairing. You have to move the drill up and down as you rotate the template. I made the scribed hole slightly smaller than the slider and sanded the hole to size using a Dremel tool with a sanding drum. It took time but the result was perfect.

3
Catch tanks. Tuned engines often have higher internal gas pressures than standard engines. This is especially true for big-bored or very high compression engines, which are likely to have a larger blow-by past the piston rings than a stock motor.

The increased pressure may lead to an oil overflow - and without a catch-tank, the oil would end up in the air filter or on the bike.

The catch-tank takes care of surplus oil and usually has a return hose back to the engine.

4
The best way to find an exact center is to loosen the stock engine bolt (where the slider is going to be mounted) so that it rests against the inside of the fairing. Once you know it's touching the fairing, apply some paint to the bolt and install your fairing. Give it some time to dry, pull the fairing off, and now use that mark to drill a pilot hole...it should be dead center.

5
http://www.dropbears.com/c/cmf/index.htm
Replacement fairings for classic bikes (not R1, but what the heck?)

6
http://www.abracing.dk
European source for unpainted fairings. R1 full kit for $500. Some question about quality, but might be good choice for racing.

7
http://www.sebimoto-germany.de/
Sebimoto fairings (European). Supposed to be better quality for approx. same price.

Repairs, Polishing
Plastic

1
Marine Tex. At any marine supply store. 2 part epoxy that adhears well to most plastics. You can reinforce with fiberglass cloth or mat if needed.

2
To fix small cracks in plastic (compared to fibreglass): Try Araldite (two part epoxy resin) sticks to damn near anything - use on the inside of the plastic to hold the crack together, let a little seep into the crack, wipe the suplus off the outside with a wet finger. Some people have had sucess with a soldering iron carefully used to melt the plastic - great care would be required on the R1 as its so thin.

3
Do not put wax on the fresh paint for at least 30 days! Give the paint and clear time to harden properly, wax will seal the paint in and possibly make it bubble.

 Polishing
1
Polish your gas cap (and other small stuff): Home Depot and buy 3 of the 7" or 8" cotton spiral sewn wheels for your bench grinder along with brown, white and jewelers rouge grades of polishing compound (Sears sells wheels and compound too...4 grades in a blister pack). Start with the brown and work down to the rouge. Follow up with Mothers Mag & Aluminum Polish (much better than Simichrome)and Mothers Liquid Pure Carnuba Wax (not cleaner-wax) both available from Pep Boys. Try it on bolts, nuts, clutch and brake levers, brackets, etc. If the surface is rough to start with, you might have to sand a little.

Painting Tires
1
DecoColor Opaque Paint Markers from Marvy/Uchida of Uchida of America Corp.
For painting raised letters on tires.

Books, Manuals, Videos
1
http://www.gofastperformance.com/
The Budget Performance Manual", $10.00

2
Clymer Motorcycle Repair Manuals: http://www.motorcycling.net

3
Duke Video USA for a large selection of motorsport videos including motorcycles: (714) 582-6238
http://www.duke-video.com

 4
R1 and R6 illustrated parts breakdown:
http://www.mondusmotorsports.com/r6parts.html

 5
Japanese language book on the development of the R1: It's 177pages and 1,800yen($15 approximately). ISBN4-87366-545-0

6
How to take good videos from the bike: I bought a camcorder mount from Grandpa's Tools. I don't have a digital camera, so no pics. The rear end of the unit mounts onto the gas tank filler hole bolts (you remove several of the bolts, and use longer ones). It has a hole cut into it, so you can open-up the tank lid to gas-up. The front of the mount extends to within a few inches of the front of the tank. On that end of the unit there is an adjustable height mechanism that lets you apply pressure from the mount on the tank, to minimize the camcorder from vibrating at the front (lens) end.

Comes with a mounting screw that screws into the bottom of the camcorder, where a tripod would normally screw into. Holds it rock steady. Of course, image stabilization and the camcorder's "wind" feature are turned on.....

7
http://www.jonch.dk(js/ A motorcycle video storage site.

Miscellaneous
1
BC800 bicycle speedo costs around $30, has a speedo, clock, average speed, max speed, elapsed time since start etc. Takes an hour to install.

2
http://www.sigmasport.com

3
http://www.traxxion.co
Source for anodizing

4
There is a place out here in San Jose called "PK Selective Plating" that specializes in top notch cosmetic anodizing. They know the chemical process well, and their color anodizing is first rate. If you want to have your upper fork tubes done in a cosmetic color I would recommend them. However, if you are looking for hard clear anodizing that has dielectric, and wear properties, then there are only a few places that I know that can really do it right, and PK is not one of them.

Have a nice day,
JAFO

5
I installed a BC800 that is sensed from the rear wheel and the indicated R1 speedO is always faster than what's indicated on the computer. Best way to measure the diameter is to place the bike on a stand and wrap a string around the OD of the tire at the center. Remove the string and measure it with a tape measure. Use the instruction manual to convert the number for the BC800.

Approximate deltas
R1SpeedO BC800
0-40MPH -2MPH
40-80MPH -4MPH
80-120MPH -6MPH
120-150MPH -9MPH

Jason

6
http://www.ajcyclesalvage.com has a 98 blue R1, parts or whole.
Date: 7 Dec, '99

7
3-M sells a product called vinyl adhesive remover.

8
http://www.myukiimports.com
 

Maintenance Related
Warranty
1
Chinango Import Motors, Yorkville NY, sells the R1 3 year extended warranty for $378.
800-346-4246 or 315-768-1077 /Dianne. Have VIN and credit card handy.

 Oil Company Sites
1
http://www.shell-lubricants.com/jobbers.htm

2
http://www.mobil.com/consumer/mobil1/mobil1/motorcycle.html

3
http://www.exxon.mobil.com/mobil1_racing/about/products/featuredproduct/index.html

4
Mobil: Call at 800-ASKMOBIL

Oil/Changing oil

Oil recommended by Forum members
1
Shell Advance Ultra 4 10W-40

2
Shell Advance Ultra is the best oil for bikes, but for car the best is Mobil 1 SAE 0W-40 (tri-synthetic technology)

3
Mobil 1 MX4T 10W-40 is designed for on-road, high-performance, 4-cycle sport bikes which are typically liquid cooled

4
Motul in our race bike. We use a mixture of 1 liter 300V and 2 liters of 3100 15-50 (then topped off with additional 3100). This was recommended to us by the Motul rep. We have been doing this for 6 years and we have never had a motor failure in any of our race bikes since we started using this recipe.

5
According to Mobil, you need the 15W50 WITHOUT the "energy saving" symbol on it for motorcycles.

6
Fram oil filter for R1 part number: PH6017a

7
New car specific Mobil One 10W-30 and 10W-40 oils in SJ classification DO CONTAIN FRICTION MODIFYERS. The car specific 15W-50 in SH/SG DOES NOT contain friction modifyers. Therefore, avoid car Mobil One in 10W-30 and 10W-40 with the SJ classifications.
The 15W-50 oil in SH/SG is just fine for motorcycle use.
Note: This is generally correct, but auto Mobil's compounding is slowly changing due to EPA rules and auto company demands. Check with Mobil before you buy : 800-ASKMOBIL

8
Mobil 1: Use the 10W-40 motorcycle specific - it's steep, at $8/qt - Autozone is one of the distributors - if you don't have one nearby, call 800-ASK-MOBIL1 (yeah, I know, there are too many digits, but it works).

9
Despite what it says in the Service Manual, don't torque the oil pan drain bolt tighter than 25 foot pounds. Use a new crush washer every time.

10
5GH-13440-00-00 Part number for the new Yamaha R1 filter

11

  1. Viscosity degradation occurs at an amazing rate in a MC engine from the shearing action of the gears; if I find it I'll post it, but I saw a graph of vis vs. hours in a MC engine (Honda study, I think) and the drop was something like 30-40% in 2,000 miles:

  2. Start with 40wt and its ~30wt in 2,000.
  3. Dirt/dust, combustion products, unburned fuel, etc. contaminate and dilute the oil.
  4. Coking/varnishing of the oil from heat both during operation and soak back on shutdown further degrade the oil, contaminate passages, etc.
  5. = you can't change oil too often from a technical stand point...environmentally, well...change your oil now, while you still can...I see a day when you won't be able to purchase oil/do it yourself.

  6. AZ R ONE


[Agreed - some folks like to use top shelf oil at $50 / oilchange, and then change it only as often as the insructions on the oil bottle suggest. I'd advise to buy the best oil your pocket can easily afford, and change it every 4,000km / 2,500 miles. Medium price oil @ 2,500 miles is a lot better than expensive oil @ 10,000 miles.]

 12
In several tests we made two years ago using a good synthetic oil in a CBR 600, after 1.000 miles it was almost new, keeping more than 95% of its performance (i.e. the viscosity index remained constant as well as many other features), so I think that changing it at that time would be a waste of money.

When we talk about a mineral oil, it's very different because it does not keep its performance so long, that's one of the reasons why you need to change it more often.
Alvaro

13
The colour of the oil does not show the loss of its performance.
Alvaro
[I learned a trick while driving cabs. They check oil levels twice a day, and the boss used to wipe some onto his finger, touch his thumb to it and then very slowly move his thumb and finger apart. As the oil degrades, its ability to stretch between two surfaces diminishes. New oil will stretch something like 5 or 6 mm, but old oil will stretch less than 3. We didn't measure it or anything, it's just something he did quickly on each of 30 cabs or so at the driver changeover, but with experience you can tell very quickly from the colour, the feel, the smell and how well the oil stretches. The colour alone doesn't tell you much. Most LPG motors, for example, leave their oil clear and golden coloured even when the oil is as thin as water, but it does smell different, it doesn't stretch, and it doesn't feel as slippery as new oil.]

14
Bel-Ray fully synthetic oil is one of the best, but the one with the best performance is the EXS 10W-50. You can see it at:
http://www.belray.com/consumer/productpages/exs.html

Brake Fluid/Changing Brake Fluid
Brake fluid recommended by Forum members
1
Motul 600 brake fluid. Resists fading due to heat build up.

2
Try some braided lines on the front and Motul 600 fluid. They improve the feel and response of the already incredible brakes.

3
Speed Bleeder Products 630-739-4620
12 South 751 Carpenter St.
Lemont, IL 60439
This is a recommended vacuum bleeder tool for the R1
http://www.speedbleeder.com
SB8125L (Part No for R1Speed Bleeder)
speedbleeder@ameritech.net

4
I have the speedbleeders and they work great! Sure makes bleeding a lot easier. With new lines, you will have to use a MightyVac to get things started.

5
I just swapped over to stainless lines last week! I ended up unbolting the front lines from the master cylinder, carefully pulling them down through the brake line guide and plastic air shield; I then unbolted them from the brake calipers. The brake fluid leakage was minimal. Installed the new Goodrich lines, hooked up the Mighty Vac to the Speedbleeders, had the Motul 600 Racing fluid ready, and had the new lines completely bled within 15 minutes! Sure beats snapping the front brake lever for hours on end, especially when the end result is brick-wall brakes. I didn't think much of the Mighty-Vac in the past, but now have a change of heart. FWIW, I used the provided non-bleeder dual banjo bolt at the master cylinder.
Jeff

6
>Did you drain the mc b4 you removed the OEM lines?

Nope. Even with the lines removed, the stock fluid will more or less remain up in the master cylinder, unless either the reservoir cap is removed, or the lever is squeezed. It *will* drain down out of the lines when you removed them from the calipers, though, so as a precaution, I would highly recommend that you have a large supply of fresh water standing by, because brake fluid will eat paint (I had a garden hose). It also goes without saying to take great pains to keep the stuff off your brake discs & pads. Unless you're going to change them as well, once the pads are contaminated with brake fluid, no degree of sanding will get that crap out. In the near future when I swap out the pads, I also plan to scrub the sides of the pistons with an old toothbrush and some hot soapy water.
Jeff

7

Bearings
1
Needle bearing for the rear wheel on the sprocket side: Manufacturer is Koyo, the part number is BKM354220-1UU

2
Another option for this bearing: German made and is supposedly a higher quality than the KOYO. The part # is: INA# HK35202RS.

Diagnostics, Troubleshooting
1
The tach jumping to 8k then dying means there is a problem with the fuel light (fuel low indicator) connector. Lift the tank and check the green connector to make sure it is plugged in. Yamaha rep told me that the R1 has a self-diagnostic tach. 6k is exup problems 7k is ignition problems and 8k is with the fuel system.

2
Tachometer trouble shooting:
1-tach jump to 3000rpm: faulty circuit:tps (throttle position sensor)
2-tach jump to 7000rpm: faulty circuit: exup valve
3-tach jump to 8000rpm: faulty circuit: fuel level indicator
If some trouble should occur in any of these circuits, the tach will repeatedly display as follows:
0 rpm for 3 seconds->specified problem (rpm) for 2.5 seconds->current engine rpm for 3 seconds->repeat.

3
Persistent oil lights: Yamaha UK believes it is the oil level sensor relay that is causing these problems.

EXUP Troubleshooting, Exhaust Leaks
1
The (EXUP) cable routing on my bike was very restrictive. There is a tie wrap holding the cables to the swing arm. Replace it with a longer one and your EXUP will work much smoother.

2
Tach will read 7000 if there is a problem with the EXUP servo valve not cycling properly. check to ensure that the servo motors wiring plug did not come loose. Check to make sure that the EXUP valve cables that run from the valve to the servo are not binding (some people have reported this as happening, as they are tie wrapped to the frame). If the valve itself is stuck, remove the lower fairing, and you will be able to get at the valve itself. There are a few small bolts holding the valve in place. Take them off, and carefully pull out the valve. Take a piece of fine emery paper, and clean off any deposits on the shaft. Put everything back in, and you should be in good shape. Oh yeah, check your fuses first! It may be as simple as a blown fuse.

3
Try YAMABOND 6S exhaust sealer to stop air leaks in your exhaust system from "popping" off throttle. Don't forget that some popping is often unavoidable on full exhaust systems when off throttle. You'll have to be very diligent to stop it all.
[Agreed - you can minimise unnecessary crackle by reducing exhaust leaks and stuff, but don't compromise jetting that works well to fix it. Some degree of exhaust crackle is just a feature of a highly tuned engine with a short exhaust and few baffles. In the days before they were fuel injected, formula 1 cars used to do it all the time. I've heard a lot of race bikes doing it. If the level or amount of crackle starts to increase, then look for air-leaks. ]

4
If you are getting mild exhaust popping, get some high temp silicon and seal where the headers seat onto the aluminum mounts. Also seal where the can attaches to the short pipe, and where the short pipe attaches to the mid pipe. You can check for leaks easily by taking a strip of paper and holding near the pipe joints. Sealing the exhaust system leaks should reducethe popping significantly. I would check this before screwing with the jetting/mixture screws.

5
If your R1 seems to lack power, check the EXUP valve adjustment. someone actually received an R1 that had the EXUP cables reversed right from the factory! This means the EXUP valve closes when you open the throttle; this will have a serious adverse effect on power output.

6
I adjusted the exup cable slack to a little looser than factory recommendations. Too tight, and you lose midrange, too loose and you lose top end.

7
R1 exhayst gas temperatures:
Temp outside was about 40 degrees F. I took temps at a couple of different places, and throttle positions. Up by the head: Idle-about 400 deg F., 3k RPM-about650+. Down as it bends behind the front wheel to go under the motor: Idle-about 300 deg. F, 3k RPM-about 400 deg. F. Kind of weird when I started checking temps all over, the top of the pipe was a lot hotter than the bottom. Like about 20-50 degrees. My carbon fiber oval Micron never got above like 140 degrees F. But on the inside it ran at about 350 deg. F.

Chain Maintenance
1
The procedure that I use is different than what I have described above, and is, I feel, a compromise between thoroughness of cleaning, mess potential (both floor & R1), and time consumption. In addition, I have found that my chain stays cleaner between cleanings using these products (I believe the wax lubricant is less apt to attract contaminants than some of the other lubricants I have used in the past).

I use:

Procedure:
  1. Lift rear tire and place drip pan under chain and place two folded paper shop towels directly under rear sprocket.
  2. Attach Z-Chain Oiler to chain and connect plastic hose to aerosol WD-40 can.
  3. Apply WD-40 to chain for 2 & 1/4 revolutions of the rear tire (stock gearing).
  4. Let soak for one minute.
  5. Repeat steps 3&4 twice.
  6. Remove Z-Chain Oiler.
  7. Wrap paper shop towel loosely around chain and hold while rotating back tire BY HAND, using the shop towel to clean off the chain. Continue wiping and refolding the shop towel until the chain appears "dry".
  8. Inspect shop towel, if extremely dirty, repeat steps 3,4,6,&7.
  9. Using latex gloves to hold the Z-chain oiler over the drip pan, clean inside of Z-chain oiler using aerosol brake cleaner in a well ventilated area. Once clean, shake off and allow to dry (two minutes max.)
  10. Attach Z-chain oiler to chain and connect plastic hose to Finish Line Krytech Chain Wax Lubricant.
  11. Apply Chain wax to chain for 2 & 1/4 revolutions of the rear tire (stock gearing).
  12. Repeat steps 6 & 9.
  13. Allow to sit overnight (or sufficient time for the wax lubricant carrier to evaporate).
Don't forget to adjust the tension.

If you follow this procedure you will end up with a chain that will look VERY similar to how your chain looked when your bike was delivered to you when it was new.

I clean, lube, and adjust my chain every 500 to 600 miles.

Please do not take offense at the thoroughness of my posting. One of the many tasks I perform in my job is writing procedures. Since this is a Forum, I am not only responding to you but feel obligated to share what I have found with others on this forum. I hope this helps, if not in it's entirety, then at least in part.
SamR1
[Hey, what is this? You're apologizing for doing something well? Can you see a plumber apologizing to his brother-in-law for fixing his leaking tap properly and explaining that it's his job? For my part, I'm happy to get and read and follow instruction of any standard as long as they're right - but if they're written to a professional standard of technical documentation - that's a bonus. There's nothing more frustrating than instructions that are ambiguous, incomplete, syntactically mangled, inappropriate - we don't have anyone from Microsoft here do we?]

2
I'm not sure if the Z-chain oiler is made by Finish Line (anyone know?), but I do know that it is included in Finish Line's "Motorcycle Chain Care Kit". That's how I got mine. In response to the post by FearblueR1, both the Z-chain oiler and the chain wax are available from Dennis Kirk at:
http://www.denniskirkinc.com/asp/wholesale.asp
P/N# 303215 Finish Line Krytech Chain Wax Lubricant 11 0z. $8.99
P/N# 31351 Motorcycle Chain Care Kit 8 oz. $18.99 or: http://www.1-planet.com/1p-fanaf.htm

3
I'm a believer in chain lube, the only brand I sell/use is PJ1 blue label, it will definitely make your chain last longer, how much longer depends how you ride/tension it. I always put it on at least 1 hour before I go riding or when I'm done riding it stays on at least 300 miles under most conditions, maybe 100 miles under very high speed conditions (120+). Once it becomes "tacky" fling-off is VERY minimal. I would never run any of my bikes without it. I use brake cleaner on a rag/paper towel to clean it from metal parts and ProHonda Cleaner for everything else. Ivan
[Agreed - PJ1 blue is great stuff.]

 4
I only use PJ1 Blue Label also. It's excellent with next to no fling off. Have been using it for 15 years approx and will use nothing else. WD40 does not have the pressure qualities or properties to handle the job as chain lube.

5
The major tip in chain maintenance is: Use little, but often. So don't spray the whole chain, but just the visible part, it will spread.

6
Here's another vote for WD-40. I've been using nothing but WD-40 on SEALED 0-RING CHAINS for the past 5 years and have never come even remotely close to wearing out a chain or sprocket.

Forum Member Maintenance Comments/Tips/etc.
1
Loose bolts and such found by S. Jannoti during his winter teardown:

2
When you remove your fairings, take time to check the inside of the lowers - you may well find that the clutch cable rubs on the right lower, coolant pipe and overflow hoses on the left. I stuck gaffer tape on the fairing inner to hopefully reduce the wear. A cable tie holding the clutch cable to the radiator hose helps as well.

3
If you sometimes hear clunking sounds while accelerating from a stop (almost like a gear is jumping) you need to adjust your EXUP cable tension. The adjusters are by the servo-motor under the tank, but you need to remove the little shiny cover on the left hand side of the exup valve to see where the cables attach. Check you service manual for all the fun details.

4
Some people have reported that their fan blades are rubbing against a wire harness. Fan comes on at 225 degrees.

5
Backfiring problem comments:

6
It is important to check your sidestand and sensor bolt torque at short, regular intervals (It is apparently commonplace for these bolts to loosen and fall out). I do it when I change oil, each 2000 miles. I've also found loose engine mounting bolts, loose exhaust bolts etc. After making the habit of checking bolt torque regularly, I've never had any problems/near accidents.

7
I regularly check the engine mounting bolts, bolts for brakes and exhaust, sidestand, fork/svingarm and wheels (every oil change is a good idea). Ask yourself: Would it be critical if this item fall off? If yes, check it often.

8
Go to http://www.tapeworks.com/Pages/instrucs.html for detailed info on applying decals

9
R1 compression check at 800 miles: 232 / 232/ 230 / 236. The manual calls for 206psi.
[Hmmm - wanna swap engines? I'll take it.]

 10
My exhaust springs resonated @ 4,800rpm even after a full week of riding to work everyday. I tried bending the springs and clamps a little bit but with no prevail to the buzz. Take some stainless steel safety wire and tie the two springs together (in the middle)

11
Oil leak: Dealer said that the generator cover had a large amount of the black powdercoat on the sealing flange of the cover. He cleaned this up and resealed the cover. So far it it is dry.

12
One tooth off the rear sprocket will help with the speedometer error.

13
I use the NGK CR9E-VX. They cost a little more than stock CR9E sparkplugs, but they seem to perform better and for a longer period of time.

14
Remove the front wheel to adjust your valves. There is plenty of room then.

15
Replacement NGK spark plugs from your local auto parts store for $3 each. Don't let the dealers rip you off.

R1 Weight
1
I have made quite a few mods to my R1 over the last year or so and wanted to get an idea of what the dry weight was. I weighed my bike, fully serviced with fuel and oil. I used a digital bathroom scale and with the assistance of my Pit Bull stands, I weighed first the front and then the rear.

The front weighed 211 lbs., the rear 212 lbs. For a total of 423 lbs.

 realize that the factory weighs without ANY fluids, but I wanted a general idea of what the bike weighs.

net weight as weighed: 423 lbs

Oil 3.8Qts. @ 7.5lbs. per gal.=7.125lbs.
Fuel 4.8Gallons@ 6.0lbs. per Ga =28.8lbs. Total of gas and oil=57.3lbs.
Approx Dry Wt. (Lbs) 387.0
Approx Dry Wt. (kg) 175.6

Although some of the mods increased the weight of the bike, most had some weight decrease.

2
That's why I said to go for the c/f tank in the first place (as the best money spent to take weight off). If you already have done the pipe, nothing else will save as much weight for the money, as changing the tank will. I have not yet found aluminum replacement wheels that are lighter than the stock ones, magnesium ones are slightly lighter, and will run you at least $1700.00, plus the sprocket, C/F ones will save close to 10 lbs, but the retail for $4,500. The original question was what will give the most weight saving for the money after a full system, and in my book, a carbon fiber gas tank is the only item that will.
SantoJ
 

Riding
Routes
1
Classic loop in the North Georgia Mountains: first take Ga 400 to the end near Dahlonega. Then take left at the traffic lights toward Dahlonega; go right on 19/60 to the "rockpile" go right at the rockpile, stay on 19 , which runs into 129; go left on 129 to hwy 180; left to hwy 60; left go back to the rockpile; make a left and do it all over again. one of the best rides you'll will find

2
"il muraglione"
A riding route in Italy called the "great wall"?

3
The 3-in-1 Map for riding GA, NC, and TN sportbike roads. Send $6.75 to: Cycle Paths, 375 Martin Ward Road, Tunnel Hill, GA 30755

4
Check or money order for $3.50 plus $1.50 for shipping charges, to:
INFO-MAP Dept. BW
5859 Cooper Creek Rd.
Suches, GA 30572

5
California: Hwy 130 to Mount Hamilton, that's it baby! Heaven on earth! Don't stop at the observatory, keep going all the way to Livermore, then get on hwy 84 to 680, and back to San Jose. 100 mile loop.

6
If anyone ever comes to Germany Look for a Place called JohanusKreuz. It's the Bomb and the only time you see the Police around is at the Rest Stop or down the road by an accident.

7
Click on this link
Sport Bike Association road list, state-by-state, including Canada

Traffic Tickets

1
www.speedingticket.net
Links people with tickets with attorneys. If you get a ticket in a different state & can't be there for your court date, for example.

2
http://www.strahan.org/tillman/helmet.html
Site on motorcycle law

Radar Detectors/Mounts
1
BEL 945im is a cordless radar unit that comes with motorcycle accessories- a helmet speaker and a couple other things.

2
Saeng detector, GPS mounts and other accessories
http://www.saeng.com/
Stealth Edging: 1 800 868-7464
#4000 Stealth Edging
$10.00 per ft.**
#4020 Stealth Trim/Tape $10.00 per ft.**
Dash GPS mount/radar detector mount
#2520 Twin flex dash mount $32.95

3
Valentine remote Audio Adapter: Provides remote control of on/off, volume, muted volume, muting, and computer mode. Provides remote speaker.
Provides headphone mini jack 3.5mm (1/8"). Provides micro jack 2.5mm (3/32") for additional remote speaker.

Riding Schools/Racing
1
http://www.racingschools.com
Motorcycle Memories and Literature:
www.motorcyclememories.comc

2
CCS (Champion Cup Series) at www.ccsracing.com

3
Mid-Atlantic Road Racing Club: http://marrc.nova.org

4
Flat track training school: American Supercamp (970) 669-4322,
http://www.americasupercamp.com

5
http://www.superbikeschool.com/
California Superbike School site

6
http://www.RandRracing.com
Florida based racing support company

7
http://www.Quokka.com
Great motorspors/motorcycle racing site
8
http://www.dorna.com/index.html

9
http://www.amasuperbike.com/991210a.htm
Good racing site

10
http://www.activebike.com
Good general riding site

 Tricks, Wheelies, Stoppies, Burnouts...
1
For a great wheelie, in third gear, get going 90 mph, which is 7,500 RPM. Nail the throttle, and at the same time, give the handlebars a good tug.

2
http://www.frontiernet.net/~pigpen/Sportbike_Temple.htm
Hooligan tips...

Racing, Drag Racing, Launching Tips/Speed Techniques
1
For R1 drag racers: New tie-down strap for the front end. Made by Cycle Shop and can be purchased through Schnitz Racing (800-837-9730) for $22.95 + tax & shipping. Cheap investment for the added safety. Several racers are using them this year in Prostar.

2
Two things will get you into the 10's: adjustable linkage for the rear suspension and the new front end tie-down strap. Adjustable link by Adjustment Tech in canada. Tie-down strap for the front end is made by the Cycle Shop; can be purchased through Schnitz Racing (800-837-9730) for $22.95 + tax & shipping.

3
http://www.dragbike.com

4
http://www.tsukigi.co.jp
For racing goodies

5
As far as my setup for getting in the 10.0's, I run the Adjustment Tech ride height adjuster at the rear. This piece is basically just a thick threaded rod with a 15/16" nut on the end that you turn to lower and raise the bike. It really is the best setup because you don't have to lift and support the rear of the bike, just crank the nut and you're 3-4" up or down in 1 minute. You can ride to the track at stock ride height, lower it, and then raise it back up to go home with nothing more than a 15/16" wrench. To use any of these other links, you have to lift the rear of the bike and support it.

As for the front, the R1 fork tubes will only drop about 1 1/2" through the triple clamps. If you take a look at them, you will see that their diameter increases at that 1 1/2" point preventing them from dropping further through the triple clamps. I drop the fork tubes and use the tie-down strap technique.

6
http://www.yzf-r1-forum.com:8080/upload/spatacho1.gif
Data logging tach, shift light, etc.

7
Drag racing tips: When you're ready to go a little faster, try this; install a 1 tooth smaller front sprocket, along with a 2 tooth larger rear sprocket, and leave in 2nd gear. With a little practice, you will be able to leave the line as hard as you wished you could have before making the change.
Santo Jannotti

8
At high speeds: Keep forward against the tank, helmet almost hitting the windshield; not the natural top speed run position but aerodynamics aren't the R1's strong point anyway.

9
http://www.gtechpro.com/faq.html
G-Tech Pro accellerometers

Shipping Your Bike

1
Jeff Allen http://www.allenauto.com For bike shipping on pallets in enclosed vans.
 
 

Apparel
Leathers
Custom made suits
1
http://www.tigerangel.com.au/

2
Z Custom Leathers - http://www.zcustom.com
714-890-5721.

Production suits, Gloves
1
Bates Leathers - 310/426-8668

2
Dainese - Moto Race http://www.motorace.com

3
Fieldsheer - http://www.fieldsheer.com

4
Tecknic - US Dist., Parts Unlimited 608/758-1111

5
Vanson Leathers - Stoughton, MA (No#)
[If anybody has a number or url or other contact info for these guys I'd love to have it. They got a very good rap from racers and would-be racers in the 'states as being medium price but very heavy-duty and high quality.]

6
Syed Leathers - 800/857-7933

7
Swift Leathers: http://www.MandP.com (site url)
http://www.Sales@MandP.com (availability)
http://www.Tech@MandP.com (what size fits me?);
UK.PHONE# IS:44 1792 224430

8
Nankai leathers dealer in Japan that will sell to you:
1243-2 TAMURACYO TAKAMATSU CITY KAGAWA PREFECTURE 761 JAPAN
email: nankai-t@bike.ne.jp
FAX +81 87-867-0641
iitoshi manager NANKAI BUHIN TAKAMATSU

9
http://www.newenough.com
An authorized Fieldsheer dealer but also has a good selection and description of used leathers on hand.
10TWS-USA @ 909-608-0082
P.O. Box: 8468
Upland, CA 91786
Fax: 909 982-6310
TWS carries Spyke Leathers; so does Ferraci

11
Held Gloves http://www.held-biker-fashion.com

12
http://www.braincell.com/kiernan/ Kiernan's site contains a conversion chart for U.S. to European sizes for leathers, jackets, etc.

 13
Barnacles Bill's in KY his ph# is 606-336-7375. Source for leather repairs, custom, and second hand leathers.

 14
The First Gear S-pilot jacket and pants offer some hard to beat features. Hard armor, enough zippered venting to make Fankenstein blush, and genuine 10 year durability. A year round suit and the only one you'll need. Another nice item is the Chase Harper "Breeze Buster". A polar fleece backed windproof nylon neck and chest bib. I wore it under my leather jacket with just a t-shirt going over Mt. Laguna a couple weeks ago and was warm as toast while I dodged the ice patches on the road.

 General Motorcycle Apparel
General Apparel
1
FirstGear - http://www.intersportfashions.com

2
Fowler's in England: 011 44 115 9267720

3
Street & Competition1175 Hoosick roadTroy, NY 12180(800) 236-5487

4
Motorcycle Accessory Depot http://www.motodepot.com
800-241-2222

5
Accessory Warehouse http://www.accwhse.com

6
Competition Accessories http://www.compacc.com

7
Bonzai Parts 800 405-7263

8
http://www.motodepot.com

9
Banzai Parts 1-800-405-SAVE
Yamaha R1 Leather Jacket - $359
Yamaha Leather Gloves - $49
Yamaha Denim R1 Shirt - $43
Yamaha R1 Patch - $2.50

10
Wet Leather (Pacific Northwest Motorcycling): http://www.micapeak.com/WetLeather

11
http://prexport.com/speedline.html

12
http://www.daytona.de/Daytona boots

13
http://www.accwhse.com/WEBREDUC.HTM Accessories Warehouse

14

Helmets
1
AGV - http://www.agv.com

2
E-mail fabba-dabba for the phone number of the dealer in his area that sells Arai's for the lowest price around.

3
Suomy R1 logo helmets available in the US in May '99. Snell and DOT certified 2.8 lbs $364 US + shipping, Modern World in Alameda, California
Modern World Ventures2236 Mariner Square Dr. #200Alameda, CA 945011 800 436-4248
Rick is the helmet guy. rick@modernworld.com

4
http://www.suomy.com

5
Quantum/e Edwards 3 (Blue) from House of Motorcycles for $360. My contact was Jennifer at 800 286-5871. You might check the Raptor, or you might look at the Edwards 3/Blue on the Arai website. The color scheme contains a significant amount of blue which is an exact match for the yamaha/R1 blue.

Gloves
1
Best gloves I ever had are my current ones - made by a company called "Just Bikers" in the UK they cost £35

2
Helimot European Accessories for Held gloves, can be reached at: (408)-298-9608. San Jose, CA, they can ship.

Aftermarket, Supplies, Minor Mods
General Motorcycle Parts and Accessory Suppliers
1
Marietta Motorsports 1 888 327 8527
http://www.1888fastlap.com

2
http://www.MandP.com

3
http://www.eastmidlands.co.uk/qbcarbon

4
1 800 359 0567 and ask for kevin pretty good deal on oem parts.

5
I've had great experience with Banzai Parts (1-800-405-SAVE). They seem to have the best prices of all these mailorder outfits and have pretty decent customer service. They get their parts from the exact same Yamaha warehouses that your local dealer uses so no need to worry about quality.

6
Call Mondus Motorsports http://www.mondusmotorsports.com
715-386-1603 20% off on all R1 & R6 Yamaha parts.

7
R1 parts: "bob tracey's world of cycles". you can reach them at 800-860-0686

8
http://www.imotorcyclestore.com
Discount accessories

9
http://www.accessorized-intl.com
Accessories for Motorcycles of St. Augustine, FL

10
http://www.motopro.com
High tech accessories

11
Helimot European Accessories
1141 Old Bayshore Hwy.San Jose, CA(408)-298-9608

Lights, bulbs
1
The Kinetic Playground at 918-743-6552 for halogen blue head light bulbs. They are "Eagle Eye" brand. This shop has sold bunches of these things and has not seen any problems with them.$17.50 each.

2
Hella yellow star 80/110w Good follow on headlight bulbs with a yellow tint for better night riding.

3
See: R1 News From: kj (alali@jagger.me.berkeley.edu) Date: Wednesday, April 14, 1999 01:49 AM for all you EVER want to know about HID headlights.
[I might go and find that, paste it in . . . - Mike]

4
http://tankmaster.com and http://www.xenonlamps.com sites for additional headlight info

Cleaners, Polish
1
http://www.zainobros.com Excellent "show" car polish and wax products

Batteries
1
Bolder Technologies; new technology battery. (303) 215-2500(Note: This technology has not yet proven out for the R1, although it has considerable potential/lightweight, high power)

Heated Grips
1
Heated Grips, well they take about 15 minutes to fit, and unless you look very closely you cannot tell. They replace the standard grips (just cut those off, and slide the new grips in place), but they have a wire moulded into one end of the grip (the end I route this wire under the bars, and under the front yoke. There is a small switch which is easily mounted in the cockpit - I mounted mine on the same bolt that holds the brake master cylinder on. One wire is then routed under the tank, where you connect to live & earth. I used the live side of the rear brake light switch (to ensure that you cannot switch the grips on when ignition is off - that would surely drain the battery!), and I attached the earth lead to the frame with the screw that also holds on a small black (well, black on a blue R1) cover on, which is underneath the black side panels (which are held on with velcro and an allen bolt). The only noticible difference with the grips, is that they have a slightly larger diameter than the standard grips (only by a couple of mm) - but I find this more comfortable. They take around 2 mins to warm up, and keep your hands very toasty warm! I wear summer gloves throughout the year, and my hands are plenty warm enough - even in sub-zero conditions (well, not as cold as it can get over there, but around -3C). I have even seen my hands steam when riding in the rain!
They cost £38 (English pounds).

Hoses/Clamps
1
Samco hoses are racing applications. Made of high purity silicone. If cost is no object...then they're for you...

Models, Miniatures, Games, Videos
1
http://www.modelimports.com

2
Tamiya model kit: $19.95 without shipping it's YZFR1 (part# 14073) the phone 352-754-8522

3
http://www.frontiernet.net/~pigpen/Sportbike_Temple.htm
Motorcycle News (MCN) here in the UK had a review of current biking games this week, and the GP500 sim came out tops with a score of 98%.

4
For motorcycle racing games/simulations: SBK by AE Sports is the best.

5
Buy gp500 as soon as it comes out...you wont regret it.

6
500GP game demo: ftp://ftp.cdrom.com/pub/3dfiles/games/gp500demo3.zip

7
http://www.hlj.com/HLJ Models (Japanese)

Video Cameras, Mounts
1
Video camera mount system its in motor cycle news. Fits most sportbikes. machined high quality aircraft grade aluminum. $69.50 each (770)491-1223.

2
http://www.spybase.com/ For small video cameras suitable for bike use (helmet cam/rear looking cam, etc.)

 3
http://www.helmetcamera.com/ For a purpose designed helmet camera system

Insurance
1
http://www.sentry-insurance.com

Miscellaneous
1
R1 bike covers (with R1 logo)Yamaha Part numbers:Black: ABA-IQG93-00-BKBlue: ABA-IQG93-00-BL$94.95 retail
2
http://www.motorcycleworld.co.uk/bikes/bikes.asp?page=Sports&testid=198&parent=198 Test of the Y2000 R1

3
http://www.motorcycleshopper.com 4,500 ads, 500 salvage yards, etc.

4
http://www.mcreports.com/ Motorcycle reports: You can buy reviews of bikes you might be interested in, including many older bikes.

5
http://www.motorcycleshows.com Website for motorcycle show info.

6
http://anvil-group.com/yards/yarddis.phtml
Salvage yard site that connects into many others. Ask for what you want and the request goes to all.

7
http://www.motoconnection.com
Motorcycle resellers; big stock of bikes, tires also.
 

. . . and that's about it. Now we start with updates and additions.

Mike


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