TO WELCOME        to hot flashes
 
 I am curious - do the hot flashes ever just stop without any kind of  therapy? 
I keep waiting and waiting.........  seems as if they would  eventually just quit.

personal experience
chart from 1987 questionnaire

Personal experience
You are asking exactly the same question I was asking when I first  found these menopause internet groups about a year and a half ago. And I  found no real factual answers, but I can tell you my own story.  That  seems to be all we have to help you find your own answers. 

      I started getting them on and off for 6 years before my periods stopped. They were some of my earliest meno signs along with heart  palpitations, fuzzy memory, sudden tears and sudden rage. Insomnia came  later, actually became increased wakefulness as found I only needed about  5-6 hours of sleep after all. 

         The hot flashes would come for a few months and then disappear for  a few months for these 6 years before my periods stopped.. I saw a  stress/angst pattern to them and came to regard them as stress-flushers. They got worse when the weather got hotter, but only in intensity, not in  frequency. 

        They got a lot worse after my periods stopped. But after about a  year and a half, they were waning in intensity again, but were still a  daily occurence, several times a day. (I never had perimeno night sweats,  although I always did the night before my period would start so I know  what they are like.) 

         I had a recent set back to the old intensity when I started drinking soy milk and now things are starting to wane again since I  stopped drinking it, almost two years post cessation of periods. I am 54. I  read in "The Menopause Industry" (Coney) that hot flashes are reported  more after periods cease than before.  Women report still getting them,  albeit infrequently, for a long time after post meno.
> Joan L

You didn't ask me, but it has been more than 2 years (no HRT), they are very infrequent (days will go by without one), but let me feel stressed about something (anxious usually), and whammo, hello hot flash.
Sherry1
I had asked a group of elderly women all over 75 about hot flashes. As I recall 10 of them, including my 76 year old mother said they still had occasional hot flashes/night sweats.No hormones. Almost all had been offered hormones by their doctors and all had refused. Hysterectomies I didn't ask about, but no one volunteered the information. I suspect none, but can't say it as fact.This was a church missionary society group of former farmer's wives,most of whom still see doctors very infrequently. Hysterectomy was not a common procedure in rural Ontario in the 1940's and 50's.

I'm still amazed by this.

I'm not at all - my mother did, I know a 76 yr old who's been on premarin for years who still does - to the extent that she's demanding an increase in dosage (my inner response to this is "duh!" ) and then of course there's me, a youthful 63....(but I don't care - most of the time;-0).

Oh! Hm. My mother didn't. My great-aunts didn't (that I know about). My grandmothers didn't (that I ever noticed/saw/heard about). I don't know that I've ever seen anyone have a hot flash, come to think about it. Surely I must have. Mustn't I?

One small data point I can add:  My mother had menopause at 48. She now is 65, and still, occasionally, has hot flashes.  (But she says they do not bother her.)
Another data point: my mother, age 74, has an occasional hot flash or night  sweat. But she describes them as no big deal.
Extract from a 1987 book published locally by Pinecrest Press
_Menopause is NOT a Disease; A Guide for Living Your Mid-Life_ by Ellen Neal et al. 
(with data from questionnaires that were answered by women across Canada)

The hot flushes are the most unpredictable aspect of menopause, and the one with the most research. Among the 150 women who answered the questionnaire I sent out, there were 43 who answered both beginning and ending ages for flushing, and had not had HRT intervention. Of these 43 women, there were only three that were still having flushes after the age of sixty. Of these three, the one woman had started at 47, one at 48 and the other at 55. Many women do not have any flushes, and some women having flushes get HAT, and that usually stops the flushing. I was surprised to see how many women were still on HRT into their 60’s. Most women had only been on HRT for a few months to two years during the time when they were peaking for their menopause. The women who did it that way were no longer having flushes.

The following chart gives the present ages of the women who have flushes, the ages they started flushing, and the ages they ended flushing I was pleased to note that those who had flushed for a long time, often did actually end their flushing. Many have flushes for a year or less, while others go on for as long as 15 years before they stop. As you can see, the so-called ‘NORMAL’ can be  anything from no flushes at all, to fifteen or twenty years of flushing, sometimes going on forever.
 

 Woman's age
Ages had flushes
No. of years flushing
43
42-43
1
 45 
35-45 
10 still flushing
 47 
44 
1
 48 
45 
1
 48 
45 
1
 48 
44 
1
 50 
40 
1
 50 
46 
1
 50 
45-46 
1
 50 
48-49 
1
 50 
36-40 
4
 51 
45 
1
 51 
45-51 
6 still flushing
 51 
48-51 
3 still flushing
 52 
46-49 
3
 53 
46 
1
 54 
50 
1
 54 
51-53 
2
 54 
43 
1
 54 
48-54 
6 still flushing
 54 
52-53 
1
 55 
48-52 
4
 55 
42-48 
6
 55 
48-55 
7 still flushing
 55 
46 
1
 55 
45-51 
6
 56 
50 
1
 56 
45 
1
 58 
46 
1
 58 
53 
1
 58 
48-55 
7
 61 
52-58 
6
 62 
52 
1
 62 
47-62 
15 still flushing
 62 
48-62 
14 still flushing
 62 
55-62 
7 still flushing
 63 
45 
1
 65 
39 
1
 66 
40-50 
10
 66 
45-55 
10
 69 
53-54 
1
 70 
40-54 
14
 70 
45-60 
15

Number of flashes reported by individual women at the time of response only

TO WELCOME

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