THE ROYAL FAMILY LINEAGE  TANGIIA-NUI  TAKITIUMU

Tangiia and Karika
During the century 12 BC there were 2 warriors, Tangiia from Tahiti and Karika from Samoa who were at sea in search of the island which we now know as Rarotonga. In the past, Rarotonga was also known as Tumu-Te-Varovaro and before that Nukutere. they saw each other approaching on the horizon, and Tangiia told the men on his canoe (vaka) to go below deck. Tangiia had about 200 people on his canoe So as they drew closer to each other, Karika noticed that there was only women on Tangiia's canoe. When they discovered that each was in search of the same island, they engaged in what we call 'putoto' which is sort of like tug-o-war, but instead of pulling a rope, they pushed each others canoes. As you would expect Karika was winning. Tangiia waited until Karika's men had used up a lot of their strength, then he called his men to get up and paddle In resignation, Karika gave Tangiia the directions as to how to get to Rarotonga. So off Tangiia went in search of Rarotonga. The further they went the more Tangiia noticed that it was getting much cooler, so he dipped his hand in the sea and it was cold indeed, much colder than he expected where Rarotonga would be, so he knew he had been duped, they had gone too far south. That is where the name Rarotonga (which means down south) came from. So he quickly ordered his crew to turn around and they went north again only to come across Karika again and in view of Rarotonga. So they engaged in another pushing war and after several days, neither winning, they decided to split Rarotonga in half. So they decided that Tangiia would get the half which had Takitumu (includes the villages, Titikaveka, Ngatangiia and Matavera) and Karika would get Te-Au-O-Tonga which is on the town side of Rarotonga. But note that Rarotonga was already inhabited when these two arrived. Tangiia and Karika were welcomed by the native Rarotongan's and even married chiefs daughters


In the eighteenth century the Makea title was divided into three branches.1 This division occurred as a result of the then title-holder elevating the eldest son of each of his three wives to the rank of ariki. Though all were of equal rank,The island of Rarotonga is the centre of government and is divided into three large districts or Vaka known as Te-au-o-Tonga with three Paramount Chiefs: Makea Nui Ariki, Makea Karika Ariki and Makea Vakatini Ariki. The Vaka of Takitumu has two Paramount Chiefs: Pa Ariki and Kainuku Ariki while the Vaka Puaikura has one Paramount Chief: Tinomana Ariki.Paramount Chief is supported by sub-district chiefs known as “Mataiapo” and another ranking of chiefs known as “Rangatira”.

TANGIIA-NUI

I IRONUI-MAOTA
II TAI-TE-ARIKI IRONUI
III TAPUTAPATEA TAITEARIKI
IV TE-ARIKI-UPOKOTINI TAPUTAPUATEA
V TE-ARIKI-OTE-RANGI TEAIKIUPOKOTINI
VI TUI-TE-RANGI TE-ARIKI-O-TE-RANGI
VII RONGO TUI-TE-RANGI
VIII TE-ARIKI-UPOKO-TINI RONGO
IX TE-ARIKI-NOO-RANGI
X RONGO-I-TE-UIRA
XI TE AKARIKI
XII RANGI TEAKARIKI
XIII TE-TUMU RANGI
XIV TEAIO TETUMU
XV TAPA-RANGI TEAIO
XVI PARE TAPARANGI
XVII MAURI-RANGI
XVIII TE-ARIKI-VANANGA-RANGI
XIX TE-ARIKI-MOU-TAUA
XX MAI-O-TARANGA-NUKU
XXI TE-AU-TANGA-NUKU
XXII TAKAVE
XXIII TUI-KUPORO TAKAVE
XXIV TE-ARIKI-ERAKA
XXV NGAPOKO-AKATURANGI
XXVI TUTU-AENGA
XXVII TE-VEI TUTUAENGA
XXVIII ARA-KI-VAREVARE
XXIX TINGIA ARA-KI-VAREVARE
XXX RANGI TINGIA
XXXI TE-ARIKI-UPOKO-TINI RANGITINIA
XXXII VAERUA TE-ARIKI-UPOKO-TINI
XXXIII TAUTU VAERUA
XXXIV IRIA TAUTU
XXXV AI-TUPAO IRIA
XXXVI MOE-TE-RAURI AITUPAO
XXXVII AKO MOETERAURI
XXXVIII IE-AKARIKI AKO
XXXIX TE-ARIKI-UPOKO-TINI TE AKARIKI
XL TAMARU TEARIKIUPOKOTINI
XLI MATA TUMARU
XLII PA-TE-RUAROA
XLIII PA TE PURETU
XLIV PA-TAUTAPUATEA-TERUAROA
XLV PA-TEPOU
XLVI PA TE UPOKOTINI ARIKI
XLVII PA MARETU
XLVIII PA TAPAERU TERITO
XLIV PA TAPAERU TEARIKI UPOKOTINI MARIE
 

    



PA TEPOU ARIKI, TAKITUMU
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