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LOW CASTES
          Merchants    Slavers    Codes    
          Assassins   Codes    
          Bakers    Bankers    Bargemen    Bleachers   Brewers    Butchers    Cosmeticians    Charcoal Makers
          Cloth Workers   Dyers   Goat Keepers   Lamp Lighters    Leather Workers    Metal Workers  
          Musicians   Peasants   Perfumers   Players   Poets   Pot-Makers    Rencers   Rope-Makers  
          Rug Makers   Saddle-Makers    Sail-Makers    Sailors    Sleen Trainers    Smiths   
          Table Makers    Tarn Keepers    Thieves   Vintners    Weavers   Wood Carriers

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LOW CASTES

"A man who refused to practice his livelihood or who strove to alter status without the consent of the Council of High Caste was, by defination, an outlaw and subject to impalement."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 46

"I now dressed myself in the scarlet garb of a warrior of Gor. I was puzzled that the garb, like the helmet and shield, bore no insignia. This was contrary to the ways of Gor, for normally only the habiliments of outlaws and exiles, men without a city, lack the identifying devices of which the Gorean is so proud."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 24

"Caste is important to Goreans in a way that is difficult for members of a non-caste society to understand. Though there are doubtless difficulties involved with caste structure the caste situation lends an individual identity and pride, allies him with thousands of caste brothers, and provides him with various opportunities and services. Recreation on Gor is often associated with caste, and tournaments and entertainments. Similarly, most public charity on Gor is administered through caste structure."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 213

"Whereas caste membership is commonly connected with the practice of an occupation, such as agriculture, or commerce, or war, there can be, of course, caste members who are not engaged in caste work and individuals who do certain forms of work who are not members of that caste commonly associated with such work. Caste, commonly, though not invariably, is a matter of birth."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 212/3

"Though one is commonly born into a caste one is often not permitted to practice the caste craft until a suitable apprenticeship has been served. This guarantees the quality of the caste product. It is possible, though it is seldom the case, that members of a caste are not permitted to practice specific caste skills, though they may be permitted to practice subsidiary skills. For example, one who is of the Metalworkers might not be permitted to work iron, but might be permitted to do such things as paint iron, and transport and market it. Caste rights, of course, such as the right to caste support in time of need and caste sanctuary, when in flight, remain theirs."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 209/210

"Even men of a caste as low as that of the Tarn-Keepers were intolerably proud of their calling, for who else could raise and train those monstrous birds of prey? I supposed Zosk the Woodsman was proud in the knowledge that he with his great broad-headed ax could fell a tree in one blow, and that perhaps not even a Ubar could do as much. Even the Caste of Peasants regarded itself as the "Ox on which the Home Stone Rests" and could seldom be encouraged to leave their narrow strips of land, which they and their fathers before them had owned and made fruitful."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 66

"Few Gorean garments are deformed by pockets. An exception is the working aprons of artisans."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 184

"The next item on the agenda dealt with the demand of the pulley-makers to receive the same wage per Ahn as the oar-makers. I voted for this measure, but it did not pass. A Captain next to me snorted, "Give the pulley-makers the wage of oar-makers, and sawyers will want the wages of carpenters, and carpenters of shipwrights!" All who do skilled work in the arsenal, incidentally, are free men. The men of Port Kar may permit slaves to build their house and their walls, but they do not permit them to build their ships. The wages of a sail-maker, incidentally, are four copper tarn disks per day, those of a fine shipwright, hired by the Council of Captains, as much as a golden tarn disk her day. The average working day is ten Ahn, or about twelve Earth hours. The amount of time spent in actual work, however, is far less. The work day of a free man in the arsenal is likely to be, on the whole, a rather leisurely one. Free Goreans do not like to be pressed in their tasks. Two Ahn for lunch and stopping an Ahn early for paga and a talk in the late afternoon are not uncommon. Layoffs occur, but , because of the amount of work, not frequently. The organizations, such as the sail-makers, almost guildlike, not castes, have due, and these dues tend to be applied to a number of purposes, such as support of those injured or their families, loans, payments when men are out of work, and pensions. The organizations have also, upon occasion, functioned as collective bargaining agencies."
"Raiders of Gor" page 133

"Tor was, as Gorean cities went, rich, trading city. It was headquarters for thousands of caravan merchants. In it, too, were housed many craftsmen, practicing their industries, carvers, varnishers, table makers, gem cutters, jewelers, carders, dyers of cloth, weavers of rugs, tanners, makers of slippers, toolers of leather, potters, glaziers, makers of cups and kettles, weapon smiths, and many others. Much of the city, of course, was organized to support the caravan trade."
"Tribesmen of Gor" page 39

Merchants (Gold & White)

"It might be mentioned, for those unaware of the fact, that the Caste of Merchants is not considered one of the traditional five High Castes of Gor-the Initiates, Scribes, Physicians, Builders and Warriors. Most commonly, and doubtless unfortunately, it is only the members of the five high casts who occupy positions on the High Councils of the cities. Nonetheless, as might be expected, the gold of merchants, in most cities, exercises its not imponderable influence, not always in so vulgar a form as bribery and gratuities, but more often in the delicate matters of extending or refusing to extend credit in connection with the projects, desires or needs of the High Councils. There is a saying on Gor, "Gold has no caste." It is a saying of which the merchants are fond. Indeed, secretly among themselves, I have heard, they regard themselves as the highest caste on Gor, though they would not say so for fear of rousing the indignation of other castes . There would be something, of course, to be said for such a claim, for the merchants are often indeed in their way, brave, shrewd, skilled men, making long journeys, venturing their goods, risking caravans, negotiating commercial agreements, among themselves developing and enforcing a body of Merchant Law, the only common legal arrangements existing among the Gorean cities. Merchants also, in effect, arrange and administer the four great fairs that take place each year near the Sardar Mountains. I say "in effect" because the fairs are nominally under the direction of a committee of the Caste of Initiates, which, however, largely contents itself with its ceremonies and sacrifices, and is only too happy to delegate the complex management of those vast, commercial phenomena, the Sardar Fairs, to members of the lowly, much-despised Caste of Merchants, without which, incidentally, the fairs most likely could not exist, certainly not at any rate in their current form."
"Nomads of Gor" page 84

"“There is a saying on Gor, “Gold has no caste.” It is a saying of which the merchants are fond. Indeed, secretly among themselves, I have heard, they regard themselves as the highest caste on Gor, though they would not say so for fear of rousing the indignation of other castes . There would be something, of course, to be said for such a claim, for the merchants are often indeed in their way, brave, shrewd, skilled men, making long journeys, venturing their goods, risking caravans, negotiating commercial agreements, among themselves developing and enforcing a body of Merchant Law, the only common legal arrangements existing among the Gorean cities. Merchants also, in effect, arrange and administer the four great fairs that take place each year near the Sardar Mountains. I say “in effect” because the fairs are nominally under the direction of a committee of the Caste of Initiates, which, however, largely contents itself with its ceremonies and sacrifices, and is only too happy to delegate the complex management of those vast, commercial phenomena, the Sardar Fairs, to members of the lowly, much-despised Caste of Merchants, without which, incidentally, the fairs most likely could not exist, certainly not at any rate in their current form."
"Nomads of Gor" Page 84

"I am a merchant," said Mintar, "and it is in my code to see that I am paid."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 121

"One hires a warrior for one thing, one hires a scribe for another. One does not expect a scribe to know the sword. Why, then, should one expect the warrior to know the pen? An excellent example of this sort of thing is the caste of musicians which has, as a whole, resisted many attempts to develop and standardize a musical notation. Songs and melodies tend to be handed down within the caste, from one generation to another. If something is worth playing, it is worth remembering, they say. On the other hand, I suspect that they fear too broad a dissemination of the caste knowledge. Physicians, interestingly, perhaps for a similar reason, tend to keep records in archaic Gorean, which is incomprehensible to most Goreans. Many craftsmen, incidentally, keep such things as formulas for certain kinds of glass and alloys, and manufacturing processes, generally, in cipher. Merchant law has been unsuccessful, as yet, in introducing such things as patents and copyrights on Gor. Such things do exist in municipal law on Gor but the jurisdictions involved are, of course, local."
"Magicians of Gor" page 394 The Merchants have, in the last few years, on certain trade routes, between Ar and Ko-ro-ba, and between Tor and Ar, established palisaded compounds, defensible stockades. These, where they exist, tend to be placed approximately a day’s caravan march apart.(...) Various cities, through their own Merchant Castes , lease land for these stockades and, for their fees, keep their garrisons, usually men of their own cities, supplied. The stockades are governed under Merchant Law, legislated and revised, and upheld, at the Sardar Fairs.”
"Captive of Gor" Page 219

"Normally, the merchant camp, like the better-organized military camps, not the melange that constituted the camp of Pa-Kur is laid out geometrically, and, night after night, one puts up one's tent in the same relative position. Whereas the military camp is usually laid out in a set of concentric squares, reflecting the fourfold principle of military organization customary on Gor, the merchant camp is laid out in concentric circles, the guards' tents occupying the outermost ring, the craftsmen's, strap-masters', attendants and slaves' quarters occupying inner rings, and the center being reserved for the merchant, his goods, and his body-guard."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 166

"Merchants must keep their friends on both sides of the fence, for who knows if Marlenus may not once more sit upon the throne of Ar?"
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 159

"The representative of the Merchants, to whom I reported my business, and to whom I paid for wharfage, asked no questions. He did not even demand the proof of registration of the Tesephone in Tabor. The Merchants, who control Lydius, under merchant law, for it is a free port, like Helmutsport, and Schendi and Bazi, are more interested in having their port heavily trafficked than strictly policed."
"Hunters of Gor" Page 43

"Down the stairway, slowly, in trailing white silk bordered with gold, the colors of the Merchants, there regally descended the girl who as Aphris of Turia. Her sandles were of gold and she wore matching gloves of gold. Her face could not be seen, for it was veiled, a white silken veil trimmed with gold, nor even her hair, for it was hidden in the folds of the free woman's Robes of Concealment, in her case, of course, done in the colors of the merchants. Aphris of Turia, then, was of the caste of merchants."
"Nomads of Gor" page 91

"Many of the daughters of merchants are proud sorts, for the merchants themselves, by virtue of their power, tend to vanity and pride, and agitate, justifiably or not, for the inclusion of their caste among the high castes of Gor. Their pampered daughters, protected from work and responsibility, ostentatiously garbed and elaborately educated in caste trivia, tend to be spoiled and soft."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 113

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Merchant Codes

"“Ulafi should have been recruited,” said the dark-haired girl. “He will do anything for gold.”
“Except betray his merchant codes,” said he who was called Kunguni.
I was pleased to hear this, for I was rather fond of the tall, regal Ulafi. Apparently they did not regard him as a likely fellow to be used in the purchase of stolen notes on speculation, to be resold later to their rightful owner. Many merchants, I was sure, would not have been so squeamish. Such dealings, of course, would encourage the theft of notes. It was for this reason that they were forbidden by the codes. Such notes, their loss reported, are to be canceled, and replaced with alternative notes."
"Explorers of Gor" page 148

"I am a merchant," said Mintar, "and it is in my code to see that I am paid."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 121

"Free Kal-da for all!" cried Kron, and when the proprietor, who knew the codes of his caste, tried to object, Kron flung a golden tarn disk at him. Delightedly the man ducked and scrambled to pick it up from the floor.
"Outlaw of Gor" page 224

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Slavers (Blue & Yellow)

"The Slavers, incidentally, are of the Merchant Caste, though, in virtue of their merchandise and practices, their robes are different. Yet, if one of them were to seek Caste Sanctuary, he would surely seek it from Slavers, and not from common Merchants. Many Slavers think of themselves as an independent caste. Gorean law, however, does not so regard them. The average Gorean thinks of them simply as Slavers, but, if questioned, would unhesitantly rank them with the Merchants. Many castes , incidentally, have branches and divisions. Lawyers and Scholars, for example, and Record Keepers, Teachers, Clerks, Historians and Accountants are all Scribes."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 208

"The distinction, of course, is between belonging to the caste of slavers and being a slaver. Whereas members of the caste of slavers are slavers, not all slavers are members of the caste of slavers. For example, I am not of the slavers, but in Port Kar I am knows as Bosk, and he knows as many thigs, among them pirate and slaver. Too, both Marcus and myself were of the warriors, the scarlet caste, and as such were not above taking slaves. Such is not only permitted in the codes, but encourage by them. “The slave is a joy and a convenience to the warrior.” Neither of us, of course, was a member of the caste of slavers. It, incidentally, is sometimes regarded as a subcaste of the merchants, and sometimes as an independent caste. It does have its own colors, blue and yellow, whereas those of the merchants are yellow and white, or gold and white.”
"Magicians of Gor" page 315

"The Slavers, incidentally, are of the Merchant Caste, though, in virtue of their merchandise and practices, their robes are different. Yet, if one of them were to seek Caste Sanctuary, he would surely seek it from Slavers, and not from common Merchants. Many Slavers think of themselves as an independent caste. Gorean law, however, does not so regard them. The average Gorean thinks of them simply as Slavers, but, if questioned, would unhesitantly rank them with the Merchants. Many castes , incidentally, have branches and divisions. Lawyers and Scholars, for example, and Record Keepers, Teachers, Clerks, Historians and Accountants are all Scribes."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 208

"From among the domed tents, wearing a swirling robe of broadly striped blue and yellow silk, with a headband of the same material, there approached a short, fat man, Targo the Slaver, he who was master of this small caravan. Targo wore purple sandals, the straps of which were set with pearls."
"Outlaw of Gor", page 191

"Samos wore the blue and yellow robes of the Slaver."
"Hunters of Gor" page 7

"We began to walk down a long, slowly bending passageway. I had seen the Curulean from the outside before, but I had never been inside. From the outside it resembles several tiers of disks, surrounded by a circling portico with lofty, fluted columns; the predominant colors are blue and yellow, the traditional colors of the Gorean slaver; around the outside there are large numbers of well-wrought mosaics set in the walls, and on the floor of the circling portico; various scenes, stories and events are depicted, primarily having to do with, as would be expected, the trade of the Slaver and his merchandise; there are hunting scenes, for example, and those of capture, enslavement, training, the sale, the dance, submission, and so on. One striking set of mosaics details a slave raid from its initial planning phases through the successful return of the Slavers, on tarnback, to Ar with their stunning victims; another picks up this story from the registration and training of prizes to the block of the Curulean itself; another records the theoretical history of certain of these prizes, fortunate enough to be sold to men of Ar, who find eventual rapture in the arms of their masters, of Ar naturally. There is another set of interesting mosaics, each portraying a chained beauty, identified as being of a given city, kneeling before a Warrior, identified as being of Ar."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 285/6

"At that moment a bar, struck in a certain pattern by an iron hammer somewhere in the house, rang out, the sound taken up by other bars, also struck, on various floors of the House of Cernus. The day, I had discovered, was divided by such signals. There is method in the house of a slaver."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 85

"To a slaver, certain girls can be recognized at a glance, as being of certain varieties developed by certain houses."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 110

"When an individual captures a girl for his own uses, does not always mark her, though it is commonly done. On the other hand, the professional slaver, as a business practice, almost always brands his chattels, and it is seldom that an unbranded girl ascends the block."
"Outlaw of Gor" Page 186/7

"Then, before I could realize what he intended, he had subjected Miss Cardwell to what, among slavers, is known as the Whip Caress. Ideally it is done, as Kamchak had, unexpectedly, taking the girl unawares. Elizabeth suddenly cried out throwing her head to one side. I observed to my amazement the sudden, involuntary, uncontrollable response to the touch. The Whip Caress is commonly used among Slavers to force a girl to betray herself."
"Nomads of Gor page 168

"“You were beaten,” I said, “because you ran away. Normally a girl who does what you did is maimed or thrown to sleen or kaiila, and that he touched you with the whip, the Slaver’s Caress, that was only to show me, and perhaps you, that you were female.”"
"Nomads of Gor" Page 281

"Similarly, slave girls, attempting to escape, can be separated out from free women, even when all are veiled and wear the robes of concealment. Again, the tests may be simple. Once, in Ko-ro-ba, I saw a slaver, before a magistrate, distinguish such a girl, not even one of his own, from eleven free women. Each, in turn, was asked to pour him a cup of wine, and then withdraw, nothing more. At the end, the slaver rose to his feet and pointed to one of the women."
"Hunters of Gor2 Page 156

"Even a slaver who has captured a free woman often treats her with great solicitude until she is branded."
"Hunters of Gor" Page 311

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Assassins (Black)

"The sword of the warrior, commonly, is pledged to a Home Stone, that of the assassin to gold and the knife."
"Beasts of Gor" page 136

"Assasins, as I recall," I said, "have no Home Stones. I suppose it is a drawback to your caste membership, but if you did have Home Stones it might be difficult to take fees on one whos Home Stone you shared."
"Beasts of Gor" page 358

"There are few men who have done great wrong or who have powerful rich enemies who do not tremble upon learning that one has been brought to their city who wears the dagger."
"Assassin of Gor" page 7

"Kuurus, of the Caste of Assassins, entered the great gate of Ar. Guardsmen did not detain him, for he wore on his forehead the mark of the black dagger."
"Assassin of Gor" page 6

"Yet none would stand in the way of Kuurus for he wore on his forehead, small and fine, the sign of the black dagger. When he of the Caste of Assassins has been paid his gold and has received his charge he affixes on his forehead that sign, that he may enter whatever city he pleases, that none may interfere with his work."
"Assassin of Gor" page 6/7

"Kuurus stepped between the great gates and looked about himself. A woman carrying a market basket moved to one side, watching him, that she might not touch him, holding a child to her. A peasant moved away that the shadow of the Assassin might not fall across his own. Kuurus pointed to a fruit on a flat-topped wagon with wooden wheels, drawn by a small four-legged, horned tharlarion. The peddler pressed the fruit into his hands and hurried on, not meeting his eyes. Her back against the bricks of a tower near the gate, a slender, slim-ankled slave girl stood, watching him. Her eyes were frightened. Kuurus was apparently the first of the Caste of Assassins she had seen."
"Assassin of Gor" page 7

"She saw Kuurus go to the tables and sit cross-legged behind one, a table against the wall on her left, that there might be no tables behind him, but only the wall. The men who had been at that table, or near it, silently rose and left the area."
"Assassin of Gor" page 9

"The older Tarl, taking the knife by the hand guard, withdrew it. It was a throwing knife, of a sort used in Ar, much smaller than the southern quiva, and tapered on only one side. It was a knife designed for killing. Mixed with the blood and fluids of the body there was a smear of white at the end of the steel, the softened residue of a glaze of kanda paste, now melted by body heat, which had coated the tip of the blade. On the hilt of the dagger, curling about it, was the legend "I have sought him. I have found him." It was a killing knife.
"The Caste of Assassins?" I had asked.
"Unlikely," had said the Older Tarl, "for Assassins are commonly too proud for poison."
"Assassin of Gor" page 42

"Little love is lost between the castes of warriors and assassins. Each deems himself the superior of, and the natural foe, of the other. The sword of the warrior, commonly, is pledged to a Home Stone, that of the assassin to gold and the knife."
"Beasts of Gor" page 136

"Once again the thousands in that place began to sing. I dismounted and went to the body of Menicius, pierced by four bolts. I took his killing knife from my belt and threw it, blade down, into the sand beside the body. The scroll on the knife read, "I have sought him. I have found him."
"Assassin of Gor" page 377/8

Assassins Codes

"I see you are not of the assassins," I said. It is a matter of pride for members of that caste to avoid the use of poisoned steel. Too, their codes forbid it."
"Beast of Gor" page 141

"Aside from these common uses, sleen are put to other uses, too. In Thentis, for example, sleen are used to smell out contraband, in the form of the unauthorized egress of the beans for black wine from the Thentian territories. They are sometimes, too, used by assassins, though the caste of assassins itself, by their caste codes, precludes their usage; the member of the caste of assassins must make his own kill; it is in their codes."
"Slave girl of Gor" page 186/7

"He seemed slow. But I knew he did not come to his somber garb by any tardiness of action or hesitancy in deed. The training of the assassin is thorough and cruel. He who wears the black of that caste has not won it easily. Candidates for the caste are chosen with great care, and only one in ten, it is said, completes the course of instruction to the satisfaction of the caste masters. It is assumed that failed candidates are slain, if not in the training, for secrets they may have learned. Withdrawal from the caste is not permitted. Training proceeds in pairs, each pair against others. Friendship is encouraged. Then, in the final training, each member of the pair must hunt the other. When one has killed one’s friend one is then likely to better understand the meaning of the black. When one has killed one’s friend one is then unlikely to find mercy in his heart for another. One is then alone, with gold and steel. I looked at Drusus.
The assassins take in lads who are perhaps characterized by little but unusual swiftness, and cunning, and strength and skill, and perhaps a selfishness and greed, and, in time, transform this raw material into efficient, proud, merciless men, practitioners of a dark trade, men loyal to secret codes the content of which is something at which most men dare not guess. Drusus was looking at me.
I kept in mind he had survived the training of the assassin."
"Beasts of Gor" page 358

“But you are of the Assassins,” I said.
“We are tenacious fellows,” he smiled.
“I have heard that,” I said.
“Do you think that only Warriors are men?” he asked.
“No,” I said. “I have never been of that opinion.”
“Let us proceed,” he said.
“I thought you were too weak to be an Assassin,” I said.
“I was once strong enough to defy the dictates of my caste,” he said. “I was once strong enough to spare my friend, though I feared that in doing this I would myself be killed.”
“Perhaps you are the strongest of the dark-caste,” I said. He shrugged.
“Let us see who can fight better,” I said.
“Our training is superior to yours,” he said.
“I doubt that,” I said. “But we do not get much training dropping poison into people’s drinks.”
“Assassins are not permitted poison,” he said proudly.
“I know,” I said.
“The Assassin,” he said, “is like a musician, a surgeon. The Warrior is like a butcher. He is a ravaging, bloodthirsty lout.”
“There is much to what you say,” I granted him. “But Assassins are such arid fellows. Warriors are more genial, more enthusiastic.”
“An Assassin goes in and does his job, and comes out quietly,” he said. “Warriors storm buildings and burn towers.”
“It is true that I would rather clean up after an Assassin than a Warrior,” I said."
"Beasts of Gor" Page 412/3

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Bakers (Yellow & Brown)

"I stayed for four days in the rooms above the shop of Dina of Turia, there I dyed my hair black and exchanged the robes of the merchant for the yellow and brown tunic of the Bakers; to which caste her father and two brothers had belonged."
"Nomads of Gor" page 237

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Bankers

"Every year at the Sardar Fair there is a motion before the bankers, literally, the coin merchants, to introduce a standardization of coinage among the major cities. To date, however, this has not been accomplished. I did not feel it was really fair of Boots to call attention to my possible lack of expertise in these matters. I was not, after all, of the merchants, nor, among them, of the coin merchants."
"Magicians of Gor" page 411

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Bargemen

"I crossed the Cartius on a barge, one of several hired by the merchant of the caravan with which I was then serving. These barges, constructed of layered timbers of Ka-la-na wood, are towed by teams of river tharlarion, domesticated, vast, herbivorous, web-footed lizards raised and driven by the Cartius bargemen, fathers and sons, interrelated clans, claiming the status of a caste for themselves."
"Nomads of Gor" footnote page 3/4

"Too, are the bargemen of the Southern Cartius a caste or not? They think of themselves as such, but many do not see the matter in the same light."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 209

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Bleachers

"Less impressive perhaps but even more essential to the operation of the House were its kitchens, its laundries, com-missaries and storerooms; its medical facilities, in which dental care is also provided; its corridors of rooms for staff members, all of whom live in the House; its library, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers and Leather Workers."
"Assassin of Gor" page 111

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Brewers

"The beast returned from the cabinet with two glasses and a bottle. Is that not the paga of Ar? I asked. Is it not one of your favorites? he asked, See, he said, It has the seal of the brewer, Temus. That is remarkable, I said. You are very thoughtful. I have been saving it, he told me."
"Beasts of Gor" page 32

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Butchers

"In moments a sack was brought and the fellow, his eyes wild, was thrust, bound and gagged, into it. I then saw it tied shut over his head, and saw it being dragged behind two peasants toward the far side of the market, to the area where the butchers and meat dressers have their stalls."
"Magicians of Gor" page 251

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Cosmeticians

"...its libraries, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers, and Leather Workers..."
"Assassin of Gor" page 111

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Charcoal Makers (Black & Gray)

"His stature and burden proclaimed him a member of the Caste of Carriers of Wood, or Woodsmen, that Gorean caste which, with the caste of Charcoal Makers, provides most of the common fuel for the Gorean cities."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 27

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Cloth Workers

"The Carders and Dyers, incidentally, are subcastes separate from the Weavers. All are subcastes of the Rug Makers, which itself, interestingly, perhaps surprisingly, is accounted generally as a subcaste of the Cloth Workers. Rug Makers themselves, however usually regard themselves in their various subcastes, as being independent of the Cloth Workers. A rug maker would not care to be confused with a maker of kaftans, turbans, or djellabas."
"Tribesmen of Gor" pages 49/50

"“I am a rich woman,” she said, angrily. “I have status and position. In Brundisium I hold high station, being a member of the household of Belnar, her Ubar. I am highly intelligent. I am educated and refined. I have exquisite taste. I am accustomed to the finest silks, the most expensive materials. I have my gowns, my robes, even my veils, especially made for me by high cloth workers!”"
"Players of Gor" page 215

"I was the daughter of a Cloth Worker..."
"Assassin of Gor" page 317

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Dyers

"...its libraries, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers, and Leather Workers..."
"Assassin of Gor" page 111

Goat Keepers

"I was pleased to see that the men of other castes....and even castes as low as the Peasants, Saddle-Makers, the Weavers, the Goat-Keepers, the Poets, and the Merchants...."
"Priest-Kings of Gor" page 294/5

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Lamp Lighters (Striped Green White & Red)

"Outside on the bridges I hear the cry of the Lighter of Laterns. "Light your lamps," he calls. "Light the lamps of love." Outlaw of Gor, pg. 252

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Leather Workers

"I knelt on the low wooden platform, while one of the leather workers, with a long needle, approached my face.
"See," said Targo, to the other girls, "El-in-or is brave."
Many of them were whimpering.
I closed my eyes. No anesthetic was used, for I was a slave, but it was not particularly painful.
It was said to be a Turian custom, from the far south, which was spreading north.
The leather worker then went to the other side of the platform.
There were tears in my eyes, for my eyes smarted.
I felt the second pain, sharp, followed by an unpleasant burning sensation. The leather worker stood up.
My ears had been pierced.
The girls, in line, kneeling, cried out, whimpering and shuddering. Guards stood on either side of the line.
"See how brave El-in-or is," said Targo.
The leather worker wiped away the bit of blood with a cloth.
He then fixed two tiny steel rods, with threaded ends, through the wounds. To each end of each of the rods he threaded a tiny steel disk, that the tiny rods might be held in the wounds. The disks and rods would be removed in four days."
"Captive of Gor" page 157

"It was there that she had been purchased by Barus, of the Leather Workers."
"Captive of Gor" page 234

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Magicians

"The magicians of Anango are famed on Gor. If you wish to have someone turned into a turtle or something, those are the fellows to see."
"Magicians of Gor" page 259

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Metal Workers (Steel Gray)

"“I am of humble caste,” I said. It made me nervous, of course, to say such things. For a slave to claim caste is a serious matter. Similarly, it would not be wise for her to be caught in the garments of a free woman. That, too, is a terribly serious offense. “What is your caste?” he asked.
His caste, as I could see from his garments, was that of the metal workers. “Yours,” I said. “That of the metal workers.”
“We share caste,” he said. “Too,” he laughed, “I may remind you that that is no humble caste. Where would the dwellers of cities be without us?” This was a way of saying, in the parlance of the caste, that the utilities and workings of metal were essential for a high civilization."
"Dancer of Gor" Page 292/3

"Her name, it is said, is Lara. Also, paradoxically, Tharna’s first minister, who stands second only to the Tatrix, is not of high caste but of lowly origin, only of the metal workers."
"Dancer of Gor" Page 385

"My opponent was not Andreas, but a squat, powerful man with short-clipped yellow hair, Kron of Tharna, of the Caste of Metal Workers."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 113

"“Remove the collar immediately,” commanded Kamras, plenipotentiary of Phanius Turmus, Administrator of Turia.
Kamchak smiled. “It seems,” he said, “that I have forgotten the key.”
“Send for one of the Caste of Metal Workers!” cried Saphrar."
"Nomads of Gor" Page 101

"Lastly it might be mentioned that it is a capital offense for a locksmith, normally a member of the Metal Workers, to make an unauthorized copy of a key, either to keep for himself or for another."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 52

"Many Gorean men apparently find pierced ears in a girl extremely provocative. Craftsmen of the metal workers, men specializing in the working of gold and silver, were concerned to work out new forms of jewelry for slave females."
"Captive of Gor" Page 167

"I visited one of the metal workers, to purchase a collar for my prize."
"Tribesmen of Gor" Page 41

"These were fine quarrels, crafted by metal workers, not sharpened rods, not blunt sticks, fit for stunning birds."
"Renegades of Gor" Page 314

"Usually girls, if not marked by a slaver, are marked in the shop of a metal worker."
"Explorers of Gor" Page 38

“I have five brands,” said the metal worker, “the common Kajira brand, the Dina, the Palm, the mark of Treve, the mark of Port Kar.”
"Explorers of Gor" Page 70

"My ears had been pierced. It had been done yesterday morning. The metal worker had put tiny, circular training pins in them, to keep the wounds from closing."
"Dancer of Gor" Page 258

"The women of a given caste, it should be noted, often do not engage in caste work. For example, a woman in the Metalworkers does not, commonly, work at the forge, nor is a woman of the Builders likely to be found supervising the construction of fortifications."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" Page 209/210

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Musicians

"To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with a kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free."
"Nomads of Gor" page 154

"A similar decree, in most cities, stands against the enslavement of one who is in the Caste of Musicians."
"Beasts of Gor" page 44

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Peasants (Brown)

"Economically, the base of the Gorean life was the free peasant, which was perhaps the lowest but undoubtedly the most fundamental caste..."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 43

"Even the Caste of Peasants regarded itself as the "Ox on which the Home Stone Rests" and could seldom be encouraged to leave their narrow strips of land, which they and their fathers before them had owned and made fruitful.
"Outlaw of Gor" page 66

Codes

"We took her without your permission," said Bran Loort.
"In this," said Thurnus, "you have committed a breach of code."
"It does not matter to me," said Bran Loort.
"Neither a plow, nor a bosk, nor a girl may one man take from another, saving with the owner's saying of it," quoted Thurnus.
"I do not care," said Bran Loort.
"What is it, Bran Loort, that separates men from sleen and larls?" asked Thurnus.
"I do not know," said Bran Loort.
"It is the codes," said Thurnus.
"The codes are meaningless noises, taught to boys," said Bran Loort.
"The codes are the wall," said Thurnus.
"I do not understand," said Bran Loort.
"It is the codes which separate men from sleen and larls," said Thurnus. "They are the difference. They are the wall."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 226/7

I sensed that the codes were to be invoked. What Bran Loort and his fellows had done exceeded the normal rights of custom, the leniencies and tacit permissions of a peasant community; commonly the codes are invisible; they exist not to control human life, but to make it possible. The rapes of Verr Tail and Radish, interestingly, had not counted as code breaches, though in neither case had explicit permission for their conquest been granted by Thurnus; such permission, in such cases, was implicit in the customs of the community; it did not constitute a "taking from" but a brief use of, an "enjoyment of," without the intent to do injury to the honor of the master; "taking from," in the sense of the code is not, strictly, theft, though theft would be "taking from." "Taking from," in the sense of the codes, implies the feature of being done against the presumed will of the master, of infringing his rights, more significantly, of offending his honor. In what Bran Loort had done, insult had been intended. The Gorean peasant, like Goreans in general, has a fierce sense of honor. Bran Loort had known exactly what he had been doing."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 228

"I am caste leader," said Bran Loort.
"In what village is that?" asked Thurnus.
"In Tabuk's Ford," said Bran Loort, angrily.
"Have you conveyed this intelligence to Thurnus of Tabuk's Ford?" inquired Thurnus.
"I do so now," said Bran Loort. "I am first in Tabuk's Ford."
"I speak for Thurnus, caste leader in the village of Tabuk's Ford," said Thurnus. "He speaks it not so."
"I am first here," said Bran Loort.
"In the name of Thurnus, he of the peasants, caste leader of the village of Tabuk's Ford," said Thurnus, "I speak. He, Thurnus, is first."
"I am first!" cried Bran Loort. "No," said Thurnus.
Bran Loort turned white.
"Will it be the test of five arrows?" asked Thurnus.
In this the villagers, with the exception of the two contestants, leave the village and the gate is closed. Each contestant carries in the village his bow, the great bow, the peasant bow, and five arrows. He who opens the gate to readmit the villagers is caste leader.
"No," said Bran Loort, uneasily. He did not care to face the bow of Thurnus. The skill of Thurnus with the great bow was legendary, even among peasants. "Then," asked Thurnus, "it will be the test of knives?"
In this the two men leave the village and enter, from opposite sides, a darkened wood. He who returns to the village is caste leader.
"No," said Bran Loort. Few men, I thought, would care to meet Thurnus in the darkness of the woods armed with steel. The peasant is a part of the land. He can be like a rock or a tree. Or the lightning that can strike without warning from the dark sky.
Bran Loort lifted his staff. "I am of the peasants," he said.
"Very well," said Thurnus. "We shall subject this matter to grim adjudication. The staff will speak. The wood of our land will decide."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 229

"The caste leader must know many things," said Thurnus. "It takes many years to learn them, the weather, the crops, animals, men. It is not easy to be caste leader."
Thurnus turned away, his head down, to tie his sandal. Bran Loort hesitated only an instant, and then he struck down, the staff stopped, striking across Thurnus's turned shoulder. It had been like striking a rock. Bran Loort stepped back.
"Too, to earn the respect of peasants," said Thurnus, straightening up, retrieving his staff, his sandal tied, "the caste leader should be strong." Bran Loort was white-faced.
"Now let us fight," said Thurnus.
Swiftly did the two men engage with their quick staves. There was a fierce ringing of wood. Dust flew about their ankles. Blows, numerous and fierce, were struck and parried. Bran Loort was not unskilled, and he was young and strong, but no match was he for the grim and mighty Thurnus, caste leader of Tabuk's Ford, my master. As well might a young larl with spotted coat be matched against a giant, tawny claw Ubar of the Voltai. At last, bloodied and beaten, Bran Loort lay helpless at the feet of Thurnus, caste leader of the village of Tabuk's Ford. He looked up, glazed-eyed. Some five of his cohorts, two of whom had recovered consciousness, seizing their staves, edged nearer.
"Beat him!" cried Bran Loort, pointing out Thurnus.
There was a cry of anger from the onlookers.
The young men raised their staves, together, to charge upon Thurnus, who turned, to accept their challenge.
"Stop!" cried a voice. There were the shrill squeals of sleen. Sandal Thong stood at the edge of the circle, in each fist the leash, a short leash, of a sleen. The animals strained against the leashed collars, trying to creep forward, their eyes blazing, saliva loose and dripping from their jaws, the wet fangs shining in the firelight. "On the first man who moves," cried Sandal Thong, "I shall set a sleen!"
The young men drew back.
Melina cried out with fury.
"Throw down your staves," ordered Thurnus. They, looking at the sleen, threw down their staves.
"She is only a slave!" cried Melina. "How dare you interfere?" she cried to Sandal Thong.
"I freed her this afternoon," laughed Thurnus. I saw no rope collar on her throat. She had removed it when she had stolen away from the circle of the fire. She stood there, holding the sleen leashes, a proud free woman, in the firelight, though she wore still the rag of a slave.
"On your feet, Bran Loort," said Thurnus.
The young man, unsteadily, stood up. Thurnus, swiftly, tore away the tunic about his waist, and, taking him by the arm, rudely thrust him to the heavy rack, where I lay helplessly secured. "Here is the little slave you find so lovely, Bran Loort," said Thurnus. "She lies before you, helpless." Bran Loort looked at me, miserable. "She is a juicy little beauty, is she not?" asked Thurnus. I recoiled on the beams, so spoken of. "Is she not a pretty little cake?" asked Thurnus. "Yes," whispered Bran Loort. "Take her," said Thurnus. "I give you my permission." Bran Loort looked down. "Go ahead," urged Thurnus. "Take her!" "I cannot," whispered Bran Loort. He was a defeated man. Bran Loort turned away from the rack and bent down to pick up his tunic. He went to the gate and it was opened for him. He left the village of Tabuk's Ford. "Follow him, who will," said Thurnus to the young men who had been his cohorts. But none made to follow their former leader.
"Of what village are you?" asked Thurnus.
"Tabuk's Ford," they said, sullenly.
"And who is caste leader in Tabuk's Ford?" asked Thurnus, sweating, grinning.
"Thurnus," they said.
"Go to your huts," he said. "You are under caste discipline." They withdrew from the circle of the fire. I expected that they would tend his fields for a season."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 233/4

"Usually, as it is their caste policy, the farmers or villagers seek new land, usually farther away, to start again. They seldom attempt to enter the cities, where they might eventually contribute to the formation of a discontented urban proletariat. Their caste codes discourage it."
"Dancer of Gor" page 303

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Perfumers

"Signature recipes are unique, and secret. They are the result of a perfumer's consultations, and experiments, the outcome of an effort to devise the perfect perfume for a given woman, though perhaps relativised to a time of day and mood. A wealthy woman may have as many as ten or fifteen signature recipes, each different. They are called signature recipes not only because they are individualized to a given woman but because the recipe bears the perfumer's signature, indicating that he accepts it as a perfume worthy of his house. These recipes, interestingly, are kept on file in the perfumer's strong boxes. The ingredients and processing remain the secrets of the perfumers. These are also of course, perfumes associated with a given house, which may be purchased by more than one woman. These recipes are sometimes, by an extension of usage, also called signature recipes. They are at any rate supposedly unique to given houses. Also of course there are hundreds of more standard perfumes, the preparation of which is widely understood by the perfumers of many cities. Slave perfumes of course are an entirely different area. These are usually heavier scents, and more sensual, than those used by free women, scents more fitting to a woman who must obey, and perfectly. There are hundreds of slave perfumes as there are hundreds of perfumes for free women. The perfumes of Gor, as those of Earth have not, have given special attention to the development of perfumes for slaves. There is thus on Gor, a subtle and complex variety of slave perfumes available, exciting, provocative, sensuous and unmistakable. There are perfumes for the salve in many women, on Gor. Somethimes though this is more expensive, a girl is brought in to the perfumers by her Master for consultation, the perfumer then questions the girl, orders her about, and may even caress her, then in the light of her background and history, and intellectual and physiological nature, he recommends a perfume, or blend of perfumes for her, this perfume or blend of perfume, is thus, in its way, matched to her unique beauty and bondage, Most slave girls, however feel that an individualized perfume is not necessary. Too, they often wish to use a variety of perfumes, depending on the various factors, such as the time of day and the their own moods, and those of the Master. Too, many girls are stimulate by wearing a perfume that they know, lie the collar and the brand, is common to many salves."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 214

"My assistant, a large fellow, but obviously stupid, smoothshaven as are the perfurners, in white and yellow silk, and golden sandals, bent over, hurried forward. He carried a tray of vials."
"Marauders of Gor" page 114

"We have here," said I, "a scent that might be worthy of a Ubara of Ar."
I uncorked it and she held it, delicately, to her nostrils.
"Barely adequate," she said.
I restrained my fury. That scent, I knew, a distillation of a hundred flowers, nurtured like a priceless wine, was a secret guarded by the perfumers of Ar. It contained as well the separated oil of the Thentis needle tree; an extract from the glands of the Cartius river urt; and a preparation formed from a disease calculus scraped from the intestines of the rare Hunjer Long Whale, the result of the inadequate digestion of cuttlefish. Fortunately, too, this calculus is sometimes found free in the sea, expelled with feces. It took more than a year to distile, age, blend and bond the ingredients.
"Barely adequate," she said. But I could tell she was pleased.
"It is only eight stone of gold," said I, obsequiously, "for the vial."
"I shall accept it," said she, coldly, "as a gift."
"Marauders of Gor" page 114

Turbus Veminius looked at me.
"Approach, Slave" lie snapped, 'land lower your head.'
I hurried to him, and put my head down. He took the loop of leather, with its tiny sack, from my head.
"You are Jason," he asked, "the slave of the Lady Florence of Vonda?" He was looking at the note, extracted from the sack.
"Yes, Master," I said.
"Her perfume was ready yesterday, he said. He went to one of the cabinets. From the sack he took the coins. They were five silver tarsks. He put them in a drawer. He wrote something on the note, and then he-put the note and the vial of perfume in the sack .I again put down my head and he put the sack, on its leather string, about my neck.
"Be careful with that perfume," he said. "It is expensive. It is a signature perfume?'
"Yes, Master," I said.
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 211

"Turbus Veminius looked after her. He, like many perfumers, and hairdressers and cosmeticians, treated his female clientele almost as though they were slave girls. Indeed he was famous for once having said, "They are all slave girls" Yet, in spite of the gruff, authoritarian way in which they might be handled, and the rude, peremptory fashion in which they might be addressed, women and high caste women, for no reason that was clear to me, flocked to his shop. He was, of course, one of the foremost perfumers, of Gor.. His prices it might be mentioned were beyond the reach of all but the very wealthy. It might also be mentioned that he did not deal at all in slave perfumes.
"Will the perfume of the Lady Kita be ready at the fifteenth Ahn?" Turbus called back to someone in the shop.
"I do not know," said the voice.
"Do not hurry it, " he said. "If it is not ready, I will order her to wait, or to return tomorrow. It must be perfect."
Yes, Turbus," I heard.
I smiled at the thought of ordering a free woman to wait, or to come back tomorrow, and knowing that she would obey you. " They are all salve girls, " Turbus Veminius was once reputed to have said.
He turned His attention to a new customer. She hurried deferentially forward. I knelt on the tiles. It was warm outside, but cool inside in the shade, I smelled the perfumes of the shop, many of which were being blended by hand from signature recipes in the back of the shop."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 213

'Ah " said Turbus Veminius, as the Lady Kita, with her two guards, entered the shop.
"Is the perfume ready?" she asked.
Turbus Veminius banded her the vial. She removed the tiny cap and lifted it to her face, which was veiled. She inhaled delicately through her nose. I saw the veil draw inward.
"What is the meaning of this?" she asked, horrified.
"Surely this is slave perfume" "No," said Turbus Veminius, "but it, by design, resembles it."
"Surely you do not expect me to pay for this?" she asked. "Only if you wish to, Lady Kita," he said.
Her eyes, over her veil, were angry.
"You wished a perfume, did you not," asked Turbus Veminius, "to distract your companion from his slave sluts, did you not?"
"Yes," she said.
"This perfume," said Turbus Veminius, will remind him of what he has forgotten, that you are a woman."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 218

'My price is high," he said, "a golden tam disk."
'I will pay it," she said, giving him the coin from a small, beaded purse she held in her hand.
She turned to leave, but then, again turned to face him. 'Yes' he asked. "Do you sell slave perfume true slave perfume?" she asked.
"We do not sell perfume for slave sluts in the shop of Veminius", he said sternly.
"Forgive me, Turbus," she said.
"Try the shop of the Steel Bracelets," It is near the house the house of Hassan, on the Street of Brands."
'Thank you, Turbus.' she said. She turned again, to leave. "And do not let them overcharge you," he called after her.
'Five two-hort vials should cost you no more than a copper tarsk,"
"Yes, Turbus," she said. "Thank you. Turbus" She stopped in the doorway, but did not turn to face him. "I wish you well, Turbus,' she said.
"Fighting Slave of Gor" page 219

"The petals of veminium, the "Desert Veminium," purplish, as opposed to the "Thentis Veminium," bluish, which flower grows at the edge of the Tahari, gathered in shallow baskets and carried to a still, are boiled in water. The vapor, which boils off, is condensed into oil. This oil is used to perfume water. This water is not drunk but is used in middle and upper-class homes to rinse the eating hand, before and after the evening meal."
"Tribesmen of Gor"

"I could smell perfumes and their mixings in the longshop behind the counter. There, at various benches, attending to their work, measuring and stirring, were apprentice, perfumers."
"Fighting Slave of Gor" Page 209

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Players (Red & Yellow)

"The Players are not a Caste, nor a clan, but they tend to be a group apart, living their own lives. They are made up of men from various castes who often have little in common but the game, but that is more than enough. They are men who commonly have an extraordinary aptitude for the game but beyond this men who have become drunk on it, men lost in the subtle, abstract liquors of variation, pattern and victory, men who live for the game, who want it and need it as other men might want gold, or others power and women, or others the rolled, narcotic strings of toxic kanda."
"Assassin of Gor" page 27

"Players, incidentally, are free to travel where they wish on the surface of Gor, no matter what might be their city. By custom, they, like musicians, are held free of the threat of enslavement. Like musicians, and like singers, there are few courts at which they are not welcome."
"Hunters of Gor" Page 148

"In most cities it is regarded, incidentally, as a criminal offense to enslave one of the Caste of Players."
"Beasts of Gor" page 44

"...he wore the garb of the Player, but his garb was rich and the squares of the finest red and yellow silk..."
"Assassin of Gor" page 322

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Poets (Aqua & Red)

"On Gor, the singer, or poet, is regarded as a craftsman who makes strong sayings, much like a potmaker makes a good pot or a saddle-maker makes a worthy saddle. He has his role to play in the social structure, celebrating battles and histories, singing of heroes and cities, but also he is expected to sing of living, and of love and joy, not merely of arms and glory; and, too, it is his function to remind the Goreans from time to time of loneliness and death, lest they should forget that they are men."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 103/4

"In spite of some reservations the Poet, or Singer, was loved on Gor. It had not occurred to him that he owed misery and torment to his profession, and on the whole, the Caste of Poets was thought to be a most happy band of men. "A handful of bread for a song," was a common Gorean invitation extended to members of the caste, and it might occur on the lips of a peasant or a Ubar, and the poet took great pride that he would sing the same song in both the hut of the peasant and the halls of the Ubar, though it won for him only a crust of bread in one place and a cap of gold in the other, gold often squandered on a beautiful woman who might leave him nothing but his songs. Poets, on the whole, did not live well on Gor, but they never starved, were never forced to burn the robes of their caste. Some had even sung their way from city to city, their poverty protecting them from outlaws, and their luck from the predatory beasts of Gor. Nine cities, long after his death, claimed the man who, centuries ago, had called Ko-ro-ba the Towers of the Morning."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 104

"It could have been worse, I thought. After all, though the Caste of Singers, or Poets, was not a high caste, it had more prestige than, for example, the Caste of Pot-Makers or Saddle-Makers, with which it was sometimes compared."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 103

"The man had been blinded, it was said, by Sullius Maximus, who believed that blinding improved the quality of a singer’s songs. Sullius Maximus, who himself dabbled in poetry, and poisons, was a man of high culture, and his opinions in such matters were greatly respected.
At any rate, whatever be the truth in these matters, the singer, in his darkness, was now alone with his songs. He had only them.
I looked upon him.
He wore the robes of his caste, the singers, and it was not known what city was his own. Many of the singers wander from place to place, selling their songs for bread and love. I had known, long ago, a singer, whose name was Andreas of Tor."
"Raiders of Gor 6" Page 223/4

"Players, incidentally, are free to travel where they wish on the surface of Gor, no matter what might be their city. By custom, they, like musicians, are held free of the threat of enslavement. Like musicians, and like singers, there are few courts at which they are not welcome."
"Hunters of Gor" Page 148

"Most of those of the Wagon Peoples have excellent memories, trained from birth. Few can read, though some can, perhaps having acquired the skill far from the wagons, perhaps from merchants or tradesmen. The Wagon Peoples, as might be expected, have a large and complex oral literature. This is kept by and occasionally, in parts, recited by the Camp Singers. They do not have castes, as Goreans tend to think of them. For example, every male of the Wagon Peoples is expected to be a warrior, to be able to ride, to be able to hunt, to care for the bosk, and so on. When I speak of Year Keepers and Singers it must be understood that these are not, for the Wagon Peoples, castes, but more like roles, subsidiary to their main functions, which are those of the war, herding and the hunt. They do have, however, certain clans, not castes, which specialize in certain matters, for example, the clan of healers, leather workers, salt hunters, and so on. I have already mentioned the clan of torturers. The members of these clans, however, like the Year Keepers and Singers, are all expected, first and foremost, to be, as it is said, of the wagons namely to follow, tend and protect the bosk, to be superb in the saddle, and to be skilled with the weapons of both the hunt and war."
"Nomads of Gor" Page 12

"The street was lined by throngs of Tuchuks and slaves. Among them, too, were soothsayers and haruspexes, and singers and musicians, and, here and there, small peddlers and merchants, of various cities, for such are occasionally permitted by the Tuchuks, who crave their wares, to approach the wagons. Each of these, I was later to learn, wore on his forearm a tiny brand, in the form of spreading bosk horns, which guaranteed his passage, at certain seasons, across the plains of the Wagon Peoples. The difficulty, of course is in first obtaining the brand. If, in the case of a singer, the song is rejected, or in the case of a merchant, his merchandise is rejected, he is slain out of hand."

"Nomads of Gor" Page 34

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Pot-Makers

"Hup's rag might once have been of the Caste of Potters."
"Assassin of Gor" page 10

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Rencers (see Peoples of Gor)

"The Rencers are often thought to be a higher caste than the Peasants."
"Raiders of Gor" page 94

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Rope-Makers

"These organizations, such as the sail-makers, almost guildlike, not castes, have dues"
"Raiders of Gor" page 134

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Rug Makers

"The Carders and Dyers, incidentally, are subcastes separate from the Weavers. All are subcastes of the Rug Makers, which itself, interestingly, perhaps surprisingly, is accounted generally as a subcaste of the Cloth Workers. Rug Makers themselves, however usually regard themselves in their various subcastes, as being independent of the Cloth Workers. A rug maker would not care to be confused with a maker of kaftans, turbans, or djellabas."
"Tribesmen of Gor" pages 49/50

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Saddle-Makers

"It could have been worse, I thought. After all, though the Caste of Singers, or Poets, was not a high caste, it had more prestige than, for example, the Caste of Pot-Makers or Saddle-Makers, with which it was sometimes compared."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 103

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Sail-Makers

"These organizations, such as the sail-makers, almost guildlike, not castes, have dues"
"Raiders of Gor" page 134

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Sailors

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Sleen Trainers

"He now no longer wore the brown and black common to professional sleen trainers..."
"Beasts of Gor" page 78

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Smiths

"...its libraries, its records and files; its cubicles for Smiths, Bakers, Cosmeticians, Bleachers, Dyers, Weavers, and Leather Workers..." Assassin of Gor, page 111

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Table Makers

"Tor was, as Gorean cities went, rich, trading city. It was headquarters for thousands of caravan merchants. In it, too, were housed many craftsmen, practicing their industries, carvers, varnishers, table makers, gem cutters, jewelers, carders, dyers of cloth, weavers of rugs, tanners, makers of slippers, toolers of leather, potters, glaziers, makers of cups and kettles, weapon smiths, and many others. Much of the city, of course, was organized to support the caravan trade ." Tribesmen of Gor, pg. 39

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Tarn Keepers

"Tarns, who are vicious things, are seldom more than half tamed and, like their diminutive earthly counter parts, the hawks are carnivorous. It is not unknown for a tarn to attack and devour his rider. They fear nothing but a tarn goad. They are trained by men of the Caste of Tarn Keepers to respond to it while still young, when wires can fasten them to the training perches. Whenever a young bird soars away or refuses obedience in some fashion, he is dragged back to the perch and beaten with the tarn-goad. Rings, comparable to those, which are fastened on the legs of the young birds, are worn by the adult birds to reinforce the memory of the hobbling wire and the tarn goad. Later, of course, the adult birds are not fastened, but the conditioning given them in their youth usually holds, except when they become abnormally disturbed or have not been able to obtain food. The tarn is one of the two most common mounts of a Gorean warrior;"
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 52

"The tarn whistle, as one might expect, is used to summon the bird. Usually, the most highly trained tarns will respond to only one note, which sounded by the whistle of their master. There is nothing surprising in this inasmuch as each bird is trained, by the Caste of Tarn Keepers, to respond to a different note. When the tarn is presented to a warrior, or sol to one, the whistle accompanies the bird. Needless to say, the whistle is important and carefully guarded, for, should it be lost or fall into the hands of an enemy, the warrior has, for all practical purposes, lost his mount.
"Outlaw of Gor" page 24

"The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese. I bought the Paga, and several times we refilled our cups. Mip was a chipper fellow, and a bit dapper considering his caste and his close-cropped hair, for his brown leather was shot with green streaks, and he wore a Tarn Keeper’s cap with a greenish tassel; most Tarn Keepers, incidentally, crop their hair short, as do most Metal Workers; work in the tarncots and in training tarns is often hard, sweaty work."
"Assassin of Gor" Page 168

"In Mip’s hand I saw a small dagger, a throwing knife, of a sort manufactured in Ar; it was smaller than the southern quiva; it was tapered on only one side. “It is an interesting knife,” I said. “All Tarn Keepers carry a knife,” said Mip, playing with the blade.(...) “Are you skilled with such a knife?” I asked. “Yes,” said Mip. “I think so. I could hit the eye of a tarn at thirty paces.”
"Assassin of Gor" Page 174/5

"There, at the edge of the straw, standing, was a large, uncouth fellow, in the garments of the Tarn Keepers."
"Rouge of Gor" Page 35

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Thieves

""There is even, in Port Kar, a recognized Caste of Thieves, the only such I know of on Gor.(...) They are recognized by the Thiefs Scar, which they wear as a caste mark, a tiny, three-pronged brand burned into the face, in back of and below the eye, over the right cheekbone."
"Raiders of Gor" page 104

"On his right cheek, over the cheekbone was the Thief brand of the Caste of Thieves of Port Kar, who use the small brand to identify their members."
"Assassin of Gor" page 96

"There are various perquisites connected with membership in this caste, among them, if one is a professional thief, protection from being hunted done and killed by caste members, who tend to be quite jealous of their various territories and prerogatives. Because the caste of thieves there is probably much less thievery in Port Kar than in most cities of comparable size. They regulate their numbers and craft in much the same way that, in many cities, the various castes, such as those of the metal workers or cloth workers, do theirs."
"Mercenaries of Gor" page 239

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Vintners

" 'Game!' I heard, an answering cry, and a fat fellow, of the Caste of Vintners, puffing and bright eyed, wearing a white tunic with a representation in green cloth of leaves about the collar and down the sleeves of the garment, stepped forth from a doorway.
Without speaking the Player sat down cross-legged at one side of the street, and placed the board in front of him. Opposite him sat the Vintner."
"Assassin of Gor" page 29

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Weavers

"I was pleased to see that the men of other castes....and even castes as low as the Peasants, Saddle-Makers, the Weavers, the Goat-Keepers, the Poets, and the Merchants...."
"Priest-Kings of Gor" page 294/5

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Wood Carriers (Brown & Black)

"I had scarcely stepped from the stones of the road when, coming down the road, each step carefully measured and solid, I saw a wide, hunched figure, bending under a gigantic bundle of sticks, strapped to his back by two cords which he held twisted in his fists in front of his body. His stature and burden proclaimed him a member of the Caste of Carriers of Wood, or Woodsmen, that Gorean caste which, with the Caste of Charcoal Makers, provides most of the common fuel for the Gorean cities.
The weight the man was carrying was prodigious, and would have staggered men of most castes, even that of the Warriors. The bundle reared itself at least a man’s height above his bent back, and extended perhaps some four feet in width. I knew the support of that weight depended partly on the skillful use of the cords and back, but sheer strength was only too obviously necessary, and this man, and his caste brothers, over the generations, had been shaped to their task. Lesser men had turned outlaw or died. In rare cases, one might have been permitted by the Council of High Castes to raise caste. None of course would accept a lower caste, and there were lower castes, the Caste of Peasants, for example, the most basic caste of all Gor.”
"Outlaw of Gor" page 27

"The whiskers had been scraped from his face, probably by the blade of the broad, double-headed wood ax bound on top of the bundle. He wore the short, tattered sleeveless robe of his trade, with its leather back and shoulders."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 27

"The Gorean woodsman, it might be mentioned, before he will strike a tree with his axe, speaks to the tree, begs its forgiveness and explains the use to which the wood will be put."
"Captive of Gor" page 238

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