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COOKING
           A Kitchen   A Cooking Rack   Iron Spits   A Peasant Roast   Food Storage  

 VESSELS
           Goblets    Cups    Bowls    Horns    Tankards    Glasses    Kantharos    Hydria    Pots   

CONTAINERS
           Botas    Bottles    Jars    Flasks    Pitchers    Kegs   

KITCHEN UTENSILS
           Trays    Pots    Plates    Dishes    Eating Prongs    Spoons    Laddles    Knives   

 COOKING UTENSILS
           Kettles    Pans   

COOKING

A Kitchen

"There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; numerous canisters of flour, sugars, and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs stood in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on one side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there. I could see the bread ovens in one wall; the long fire pit over which could be put cooking racks, the mountings for spits and kettle hooks; the fire pit was mostly black now, but here and there I could see a few broken sticks of glowing charcoal; aside from this, the light in the room came from one small tharlarion oil lamp hanging from the ceiling...."
"Assassin of Gor" pages 271/272

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A Cooking Rack

"She built up the fire. I watched her. She unfolded and adjusted a single-bar cooking rack, placing it over the fire. From this she suspended a kettle of water. The single bar, which may be loosened in its rings, and has a handle, may also function as a spit."
"Renegades of Gor" page 150

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Iron Spits

"Many were the roast tarsk and roast bosk that had roasted over the long fire, on the iron spits. Splendid was the quality of the ale at the tables of the Blue Tooth. Sweet and strong was the mead."
"Marauders of Gor" page 191

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A Peasant Roast

"The suspension of the meat reminded me of the way peasant women sometimes cook roasts, tying them on a cord and dangling them, before a fire, then spinning the meat from time to time. In this way, given the twisting and untwisting of the cord, the meat will cook rather evenly, for the most part untended, and without spit turning."
"Renegades of Gor" page 120

"Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires, kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the islands by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans."
"Raiders of Gor" page 44

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Food Storage

"My house, incidentally, like most Gorean houses, had no ice chest. There is little cold storage on Gor. Generally food is preserved by being dried or salted. Some cold storage, of course, does exist. Ice is cut from ponds in the winter, and then stored in ice houses, under sawdust. One may go to the ice houses for it, or have it delivered in ice wagons. Most Goreans, of course, cannot afford the luxury of ice in the summer."
"Guardsman of Gor" page 295

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VESSELS

Goblets

"Because there are many Goreans who cannot read, many stores , shops, and such, will utilize various signs and devices to identify their place of business. For example, a large, wooden image of a paga goblet may hang outside a tavern."
"Magicians of Gor" page 393

"Many civilians, I believe, do not know why certain warriors, by habit, request their paga in metal goblets when dining in public houses."
"Renegades of Gor" page 77

"Before we set out we broke open the great bottle of paga and Tharnack, Clitus and I clashed goblets and emptied them of their swirling fires."
"Raiders of Gor" page 113

"I rose to my feet and lifted my goblet of paga, acknowledging the cries of my retainers."
"Raiders" page 218

"I thrust out the silver paga goblet, studded with rubies, and Telima, standing beside my thronelike chair, filled it."
"Raiders of Gor" page 223

"I held out the paga goblet, and she refilled it."
"Raiders od Gor page 231

"Your paga," said the nude slave girl, who served me, her wrists chained. "It is warmed as you wished." I took it from her not even glancing upon her, and drained the goblet."
"Raiders of Gor" page 100

"Tamirus lifted his hand good-humoredly, graciously, to Mirus, and then, too, to the others in the tavern, and returned to his table. There, waiting for him, was a goblet of paga, doubtless a gratuity for the loan of his expertise."
"Dancer of Gor" page 187

"I heard the roars of triumph, shouts of pleasure. I was frightened. The men were on their feet. There was a thunder of applause, the striking of the shoulders in the Gorean fashion, and, too, the crashing of goblets on the tables."
"Dancer of Gor" page

"A toast," we called.
Shirley hurried about, making sure there was wine in the goblets. Callimachus drank water, but he permitted a drop of wine to mix in the water, that the ceremony of the toast might be one in which he fully shared. Wine, incidentally, is often mixed with water in Gorean homes. This is primarily because of the potency of many Gorean wines. The wines I was serving, however, were such that, sensibly, they could be served undiluted. An alternative with the potent wines is to serve very small amounts of them. We stood. The musicians stopped playing."
"Guardsman of Gor" page

"She reached to the wine, a sweet Ka-la-na of Ar, and filled the goblet to the third ring. Then, as I sat back against the couch, she knelt before me. She, head down, pressed the heavy metal goblet deep into her lower abdomen, and then she lifted it to her lips and, holding it with both hands, kissed it lingeringly and lovingly. Then, kneeling back on her heels she put down her head and, humbly, her arms extended, her head down between them, proffered me the goblet.
"Wine, Master?" she asked."
"Yes," I said. I then took the goblet from her, and drank. She lifted her head, and watched me.
"I think you know how to serve wine well," I said.
"Master should know," she laughed.
I indicated that she should approach me. "Keep your hands on your thighs," I told her.
"Yes, Master," she said.
I then, crouching beside her, my hand in her hair, controlling her, gave her to drink from the goblet, letting her finish the last ring. I then gave her the goblet, and she put it to the side, with the wine vessel.
I then sat back again, against the foot of the couch. She, kneeling to the side, in the lovely position of the pleasure slave, watched me."
"Guardsman of Gor" page

"Temione had now filled her paga vessel. She picked up a goblet from a rack near the vat. The shelving on the rack was of narrow wooden rods. The goblets are kept upside down on the rods. In this way, washed, they can drain, and dry. This also affords them some protection from dust. I watched her carefully wipe the goblet. Woe to the slave who would dare to serve paga or wine in a dirty goblet!"
"Vagabonds of Gor" page

"But Kamchak said nothing. Then he took his goblet of Paga and drained it, watching the girls swaying to the caress of Turian melodies."
"Nomads of Gor" page 97

"When Kamchak had finished he held out his right hand and a man, not a Tuchuk, who wore the green robes of the Caste of Physicians, thrust in his hand a goblet of bosk horn; it contained some yellow fluid. Angrily, not concealing his distaste, Kutaituchik drained the goblet and then hurled it from him."
"Nomads of Gor" page

"I took the goblet, filled with burning paga. I had not had paga since returning from the northern forests. (...) I threw from me the goblet of gold."
"Marauders of Gor" page 22

"More paga, " I said. Another vessel was brought (...) Then I drained the goblet and flung it from me."
"Marauders of Gor" page 23

"I observed Inge filling the paga goblet of one of the huntsmen. She knelt closer to him than she needed to. Her lips were parted. Her eyes shone. Her hands, slightly, shook on the paga bottle."
"Captive of Gor" page 301

“Paga, Masters?” asked the dark-haired girl, kneeling beside the table. Samos, not looking at her, held forth his goblet. The girl filled the goblet. I held forth my goblet, and she, too, filled mine."
"Hunters of Gor" page 9

"Another man turned away from her, when she approached him, to have his goblet of paga filled by a luscious, half-naked, collared slave."
"Players of Gor" page 20

"Pembe placed a goblet of paga in her hands. He then pointed in my direction."
"Explorers of Gor page 172

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Cups

"I decided I might care to taste the steaming black wine. I lifted my finger. The girl in whose charge was the silver vessel, filled with black wine, knelt beside a tiny brazier, on which it sat, retaining it's warmth. She rose swiftly to her feet. She knelt, head down, before me. She poured carefully, the hot, black beverage into the tiny red cup. I dismissed her."
"Guardsman of Gor" page 244/5

"I lifted the tiny silver cup to my lips and took a drop of the black wine. It's strength and bitterness are such that it is normally drunk in such a manner, usually only a drop or a few drops at a time. Commonly, too, it is mollified with creams and sugars. I drank it without creams and sugars, perhaps, for I had been accustomed, on Earth, to drinking coffee in such a manner, and the black wine of Gor is clearly coffee, or closely akin to coffee. Considering its bitterness, however, if I had not been drinking such a tiny amount, and so slowly, scarcely wetting my lips, I too, would surely have had reacourse to the tasty, gentling additives with which it is almost invariably served."
"Guardsman of Gor" page 247

"Verr milk, Masters!" I heard called. "Verr milk, Masters!" I opened the slats a tiny crack. I wished to see if she were pretty. She was, in her tunic and collar, kneeling on a white blanket, spread on the cement, with the brass container of verr milk, with its strap, near her, and the tiny brass cups. She was extremely lightly complexioned and had very red hair."
"Savages of Gor" page 61

"I ordered another cup of paga."
"Explorers of Gor" page 132

"I opened my eyes. I proffered, tears in my eyes, the cup of paga to my captor."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 68

"My master extended his cup to me, and I, kneeling, filled it with Sul paga."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 82

"Sometimes inert, esteemed Gorean free women cry out in rage, not understanding why their companions have forsaken them for the evening, to go to the paga tavern; there, of course, for the price of a cup of paga, he can get his hands on a silken, belled girl, a slave (...)
"Tribesmen of Gor page 25

"At the end of her dance, she is given a cup of wine, but she may not drink. She approaches the young man and kneels before him, her knees in the dictated position of the Pleasure Slave, and, head down, she proffers the wine to him. He drinks. There is another general shout of commendation and well wishing, and the feast begins, for none before the young man may touch food on such occasions. From that moment on, the young man's sisters never again serve him, for that is the girl's task. She is his slave."
"Outlaw of Gor" page

"On the tray, too, was the metal vessel which had contained the black wine, steaming and bitter, from far Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, the small yellow-enameled cups from which we had drunk the black wine, its spoons and sugars, a tiny bowl of mint sticks, and the softened, dampened cloths on which we had wiped our fingers."
"Explorers of Gor

"Other girls now appeared among the tables, clad only in a camisk and a silver collar, and sullenly, silently, began to serve the Kal-da which Kron had ordered. Each carried a heavy pot of the foul, boiling brew and, cup by cup, replenished the cups of the men."
"Outlaw of Gor" page

"Attached to the vessel, by a light chain, was a golden cup. It had two handles.
From a spout on the vessel, grinning, Gorm filled the golden cup. The liquid swirling in the cup was black."
"Marauders of Gor page 83

I hurried to him, carrying the large bronze vessel of paga, on its strap about my shoulder.
I knelt and filled his cup."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 293

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Bowls

"At a gesture from the proprietor, the grimy man in the tunic of white and gold, one of the serving slaves, with a flash of her ankle bells, hurried to the Assassin and set before Him a bowl, which she trembling filled from the flask held over her right forearm. then, with a furtive glance at the girl chained at the side of the room, the serving slave hurried away. Kuurus took the paga bowl in both hands and put his head down, looking into it. Then somberly, He lifted it to his lips and drank.’
"Assassins of Gor" page 9

‘'I had heard of black wine, but had never had any. It is drunk in Thentis, but I had never heard of it being much drunk in other Gorean cities. (...) Then I picked up one of the thick, heavy clay bowls. It was extremely strong, and bitter, but it was hot, and, unmistakably, it was coffee.’
"Assassins of Gor" page 106

" I then took the wine, with a small copper bowl, and a black, red-rimmed wine crater, to the side of the fire."
"Captive of Gor page 331

"I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer."
"Raiders of Gor" page 44

"The slender blond girl, who had been giving men water from the skin bag, was now given the work of filling small bowls from the large wooden bowl, for the bond-maids. She used a bronze ladle. (...) The girls, including the slender blondish girl, emptied their bowls, even to licking them, that no grain be left."
"Marauders of Gor" Page 64/5

"Seems that slave girls mostly ate their gruel from troughs or from bowls, using their fingers. "I shared breakfast with Elizabeth who informed me that it was better than the porridge below in the trough in the feeding room for female staff slaves, (...)"
"Assassin of Gor" Page 106/7

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Horns

‘I held up the large drinking horn of the north. 'There is no way for this to stand upright' I said to him, puzzled. He threw back his head again and roared once more with laughter.
'If you cannot drain it' he said, 'give it to another!' I threw back my head and drained the horn. 'Splendid!' cried the Forkbeard.’"
"Marauders of Gor" page 89

"Pretty Ankles hurried past, carrying a great trencher of roast meat on her small shoulder.
“Mead!” called Ivar Forkbeard, from across from me.
“Mead!” He held out the great, curved horn, with its rim fillgreed gold."
"Marauders of Gor" page

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Tankards

"Assassins of Gor" page

"The Forkbeard himself now, from a wooden keg, poured a great tankard of ale, which must have been of the measure of five gallons. Over this he then closed his fist. It was the sign of the hammer, the sign of Thor. The tankard then, with two great bronze handles, was passed from hands to hands among the rowers. The men threw back their heads and, the liquid spilling down their bodies, drank ale. It was the victory ale."
"Maraurders of Gor" page 82

‘I turned and, among the furnishings of the tent, found a bottle of Ka-la-na, of good vintage, from the vineyards of Ar, the loot of a caravan raid. I then took the wine, with a small copper bowl, and a black, red-rimmed wine crater, to the side of the fire. I poured some of the wine into the small copper bowl, and set it on the tripod over the tiny fire in the fire bowl. After a time I took the copper bowl from the fire and held it against my cheek. I returned it again to the tripod, and again we waited. Again I took the bowl from the fire. It was now not comfortable to hold the bowl, but it was not painful to do so. I poured the wine from the small copper bowl into the black, red-trimmed wine crater, placing the small bowl in a rack to one side of the fire. I swirled, slowly, the wine in the wine crater. I saw my reflection in the redness, the blondness of my hair, dark in the wine, and the collar, with its bells, about my throat... I did not know how he cared for his wine, for some men of Treve wish it warm, almost hot.’
"Captive of Gor" page

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Glasses

"Explorers of Gor"

"The beast returned from the cabinet with two glasses and a bottle."
"Beasts of Gor" page 371

"Is it ready? I asked. I looked at the tiny copper kettle on the small stand. A tiny kaiila dung fire burned under it. A small, heavy, curved glass was nearby, on a flat box, which would hold some two ounces of the tea. Bazi tea is drunk in tiny glasses, usually three at a time, carefully measured. She did not make herself tea, of course."
"Tribesmen of Gor" page 139

"First from the kitchen, bearing her tray, came the voluptuous slave of Aemilianuus. Behind her, too with her tray, came the little dark-haired slave. In a moment both were deferentially serving. The collared softness of the dark-haired girl well set off the the metal of the tray, and the small multicolored glasses and bottles upon it."
"Guardsman of Gor" page 254

"I had been considering a glass of paga, perhaps, if it were available in a place such as this, of the brewery of Temus."
"Mercenaries of Gor" page 342

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Kantharos

"She knelt near the table. (...) and put the paga, in a small kantharos."
"Renegades of Gor" page 71

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Hydria

"The girls filled their vessels, which, like the hydria, or water vessel, are high-handled, for dipping, in a large kettle hung simmering over a fire near the entrance to the enclosure."
"Vagabonds of Gor" page 16

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Pots

"I decided, if worse came to worst, that I could always go to a simple Paga Tavern where, if those of Tharna resembled those of Ko-ro-ba and Ar, one might, curled in a rug behind the low tables, unobtrusively spend the night for the price of a pot of Paga."
"Outlaw of Gor" page 74

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CONTAINERS

Botas

The word "bota" appears in rare occasions in the books. One never sees botas being used in Paga taverns, and even among the Tuchuks, when buying paga, it comes in a bottle. As you will note, botas were used in camps around the fire, on Tarn back, when travelling, as personnal containers, in the street, in Port Kar by sailors, and in Ar by male slaves.

"'May your tarn lose its feathers,' he roared, slapping his thigh, bringing his tarn to rest on the perch. He leaned over and tossed me a skin bag of Paga, from which I took a long swig, then hurled it contemptuously back into his arms. In a moment he had taken flight again, bawling out some semblance of a song about the woes of a camp girl, the bag of Paga flying behind him, dangling from its long straps."
"Tarnsman of Gor" page 78

"About the fire, were the stranger, still masked, and, unarmed, Callisthenes and Sempronius. Their blades were hung on the side of the closed slave wagon. They were talking, and passing a bota about, which probably contained paga."
"Dancers of Gor" page 428

"The stranger had now screwed shut the lid on the bota."
"Dancers of Gor" page 429

"'Drink', he said. He thrust the horn nozzle of a leather bota of water between my teeth. I almost choked."
"Captive of Gor" page 256

"In a moment, he lifted me to a sitting position and, his left hand behind my back, supporting me, thrust the spike of the bota in my mouth. Eagerly then did I drink."
"Slave Girl of Gor" page 32

"“Paga, mate?” inquired a mariner. I took a swig of paga from his bota and he one from mine."
"Players of Gor" page 39

"We exchanged swigs, I from his bota, he from mine. Then he turned aside, to offer paga to another. I stepped back, while one of the gigantic fellows, on stilts, stalked by. I was jostled. I checked my wallet. It was intact."
"Players of Gor" page 39

"Three male house slaves stumbled by, crowned with odorous garlands woven of the Brak Bush. They were passing about a bota of paga and, between dancing and trying to hold one another up, managed to weave unsteadily by. One of them looked at me and from his eyes I judged he may have seen at least three of me and offered me a swig of the bota, which I took.
"Kajuralia," said he, nearly falling over backwards, being rescued by one of his fellows, who seemed fortunately to be falling in the opposite direction at the same time. I gave him a silver coin for more paga.
"Kajuralia," I said, and turned about, leaving, while they collapsed on one another."
"Assassin of Gor" page 223

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Bottles

"Aphris got up and fetched not a skin, but a bottle, of wine, Ka-la-na wine, from the Ka-la-na orchards of great Ar itself.

"Nomads of Gor" page 146

"The public slave wagons, incidentally, also provide Paga. They are a kind of combination Paga tavern and slave market. I know of nothing else precisely like them on Gor. Kamchak and I had visited one last night where I had ended up spending four copper tarn disks for one bottle of Paga."
"Nomads of Gor" page 118

"As I may have mentioned the Turians, on the whole, favor thick, sweet wines. I had taken, as a share of battle loot, a hundred and ten bottles of Paga and forty bottles of Ka-la-na wine from Tyros, Cos and Ar, but these I had distributed to my crossbowmen, with the exception of one bottle of Paga which Harold and I had split some two nights ago."
"Nomads of Gor" page 275

"When I returned with the bottle I had to step through, over, and once or twice on, Tuchuks. (...) I bit out the cork in the Paga and passed it past Elizabeth to Kamchak, as courtesy demanded."
"Nomads of Gor" page 153

"In most taverns no bottle is brought to the table but the paga is brought to the table, by the paga slave, a cup at a time, the cups normally being filled from a vat behind the counter."
"Explorers of Gor" page 158

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Jars

"Fetch your wine and return," said Ute. I dipped the wine vessel into the great stone jar, again filling it."
"Captive of Gor" page 326

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Flasks

"There were flasks of wine there, and bottles of the brew called paga; stores of salt, grains, dried meats and vegetables; tunics, cloths and blankets; too, there were tools and utensils, and threads and needles; I found some perfumes and jewelries."
"Slave Girl" page 50

"At a gesture from the proprietor, the grimy man in the tunic of white and god, one of the serving slaves, with a flash of her ankle bells, hurried to the Assassin and set before him a bowl, which she trembling filled from the flask held over her right forearm."
"Assassin of Gor" page 9

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Pitchers

"Tribesman of Gor" page

"One of them carried a large pitcher of the diluted Ka-la-na wine and stepped behind us, climbing the two steps to the broad wooden dais on which our tables were set."
"Assassin of Gor" page 88

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Kegs

"The Forkbeard himself now, from a wooden keg, poured a great tankard of ale, which must have been of the measure of five gallons."
"Marauders of Gor" page 82

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KITCHEN UTENSILS

Trays

On the tray, too, was the metal vessel which had contained the black wine, steaming and bitter, from far Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, the small yellow-enameled cups from which we had drunk the black wine, its spoons and sugars, a tiny bowl of mint sticks, and the softened, dampened cloths on which we had wiped our fingers."
"Explorers of Gor"

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Pots

""Master," said Peggy, approaching the table, kneeling beside it, bearing a tray. She placed the tray on the table and removed three plates of bread and meat from it, a dish of assorted cheeses, a bowl of dates, a pitcher of water, a pot of black wine, steaming, and tiny vessels of sugars and creams, and three goblets."
"Rogue of Gor" page 121 ?

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Plates

"I listened again to the murmur of the men outside, the small sounds of their goblets and plates."
"Dancer of Gor" page

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Dishes

"Before them had been placed large golden dishes heaped with delicacies prepared by the kitchens of the Ubar, tall precious goblets filled with Turian wines, the small bowls of spices and sugars with their stirring spoons at hand. The tables were served by naked Turian girls, from the highest families of the city."
"Nomads of Gor" page

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Eating Prongs

"I shot the spiced vulo brain into my mouth on the end of a golden eating prong, a utensil, as far as I knew, unique to Turia."
"Nomads of Gor" page 84 "On the table too, she placed small spoons of silver from Tharna for use with the black wine, and at each place, a kailiauk-horn-handled eating prong from distant Tura. Finger towels then and a silver fingerbowl too, she placed on the table."
"Rogue of Gor" page 121 ?

"With a serving prong she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul in my plate."
"Guardman of Gor" page 234

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Spoons

"The horn spoon snapped in his hands, and he angrily threw the pieces into his bowl."
"Assassin of Gor" page 120

"In a few Ehn Lola returned with the tray, with the vessel of steaming liquid, the creams and sugars, the tiny cups and the small spoons for mixing and measuring."
"Rogue of Gor" page 132 ?

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Laddles

"The slender blond girl, who had been giving men water from the skin bag, was now given the work of filling small bowls from the large wooden bowl, for the bond-maids. She used a bronze ladle...The girls, including the slender blondish girl, emptied their bowls, even to licking them, that no grain be left..."
"Marauders of Gor" page 64/5

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Kitchen Knives

"The ulo, or woman's knife, with its semicircular blade, customarily fixed to a wooden handle, is not well suited to carving. It is better at cutting meat and slicing sinew."
"Beasts of Gor" page 262

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COOKING UTENSILS

Kettles

"Is it ready? I asked. I looked at the tiny copper kettle on the small stand. A tiny kaiila dung fire burned under it. A small, heavy, curved glass was nearby, on a flat box, which would hold some two ounces of the tea."
"Tribesmen of Gor" page 139

"The girls filled their vessels, which, like the hydria, or water vessel, are high-handled, for dipping, in a large kettle hung simmering over a fire near the entrance to the enclosure. Warm paga makes one drunk quicker, it is thought."
"Vagabonds of Gor" page 16

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